True to form, Dan Savage is mincing few words when it comes to Mitt Romney.

The outspoken lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights advocate and syndicated columnist told John Fugelsang (sitting in for Joy Behar) that he didn't distinguish "between an honest bigot and a dishonest bigot" and that the Republican presidential candidate was "100 percent anti-gay."

Savage also noted, "Whether someone punches you in the nose because they really hate you, or they punch you in the nose because they want to impress people who hate you, you still have a broken goddamn nose...What I care about is policy, and his policies are homophobic, and by my estimation, that man is a homophobe."

In other Dan Savage news, Viacom officials announced this week that a second, hour-long installment of the award-winning "It Gets Better" TV special will air on MTV and Logo two days ahead of National Coming Out Day, with Savage once again serving as anchor.

H/T Towleroad.

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  • One out of five LGBT voters say would consider voting for Mitt Romney if he held the same position on gay rights as President Obama.

  • One out of every four LGBT voters (26 percent) said they'd be more likely to vote Republican if the GOP held the same positions on LGBT rights as the Democratic party.

  • The survey finds that both general population voters (48 percent) and LGBT voters (67 percent) are currently leaning toward re-electing President Obama over Mitt Romney.

  • Support for same-sex marriage went from 31 percent in 2007 among all adults to 52 percent in 2012 among likely voters.

  • Forty-nine percent of the population says they'd be more likely to vote for a political candidate who supports legislation to define and prevent bullying of LGBT youth.

  • The economy was named as the most important issue in deciding the 2012 presidential election vote by both LGBT people (18 percent) and the general population voters (24 percent) surveyed.

  • Forty-eight percent of general population voters said they out be more likely to vote for a political candidate who supported laws prohibiting workplace discrimination of LGBT people, compared with just 14 percent who said they would be less likely.

  • Thirty-eight percent of general population voters said they'd be more likely to vote for the candidate who supports legal recognition of same-sex marriage.

  • Of the general population voters polled, 41 percent said they'd be more likely to vote for the political candidate who would continue to allow LGBT people to serve openly in the military.

  • Thirty-six percent of general population voters polled said they'd vote for the candidate who'd support adoptions by same-sex couples.

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