Huffpost Politics

Mitt Romney Favorability Lower Than George W. Bush, Poll Finds

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U.S. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks at 'Veterans for Romney' campaign event in Springfield, Va., on Sept. 27. (JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GettyImages)
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks at 'Veterans for Romney' campaign event in Springfield, Va., on Sept. 27. (JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GettyImages)

If Mitt Romney was hoping to distance himself from former President George W. Bush, a new poll has some news that might trouble the Republican presidential nominee: Bush posted higher favorability ratings than Romney.

The national survey, conducted by Bloomberg News and released Wednesday, found that Bush received a favorable rating of 46 percent, while Romney's favorable rating was 43 percent. Forty-nine percent of respondents gave Bush an unfavorable rating, compared to 50 percent of respondents who gave Romney an unfavorable rating.

Bush's favorability ratings also bested those of the Republican Party at large (41 percent favorable, 46 percent unfavorable) and Vice President Joe Biden (42 percent favorable, 45 percent unfavorable).

A wave of recent polls has shown Romney struggling to keep up with President Barack Obama. A lower favorability rating than Bush, who was recently named the most unpopular living U.S. president, shows how difficult it has been for the GOP nominee to resonate with voters during his current presidential bid.

Romney has avoided mentioning Bush's name while campaigning across the country, often referring to the former president only as Obama's "predecessor." Bush was also noticeably absent from the Republican National Convention in Tampa in August, but has stated his support of Romney.

"I'm interested in politics. I'm a supporter of Mitt Romney," he said in an interview in July. "I hope he does well. But you know, he can do well without me."

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