JERUSALEM — Vandals scribbled anti-Christian graffiti on the outer walls of one of Jerusalem's best-known churches early Tuesday morning, Israeli police said. Extremist Jewish West Bank settlers are suspected.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said the perpetrators defaced a wall leading to the Church of the Dormition. The century-old structure is built on the site where tradition says the Virgin Mary died.

The graffiti, which read "Jesus, son of a whore, price tag," had already been removed by midmorning, said Rosenfeld.

He says police are still searching for the assailants, though suspicion has fallen on a fringe group of pro-settler Jewish extremists who have carried out similar vandalism on churches, mosques and Israeli army property. They say the acts are in response to what they consider pro-Palestinian policies by the Israeli government, a form of retribution they call a "price tag."

Tuesday's graffiti is the latest in a wave of vandalism on Christian holy sites in Israel. Israel has about 155,000 Christian citizens, less than 2 percent of its 7.9 million people, but the repeated defacing of their sacred sites has shocked the country and drawn official condemnation.

"Price tag actions go against the morals and values of Judaism and do great harm to the state of Israel," said President Shimon Peres, speaking at a meeting with one of Israel's chief rabbis during a celebration of the Jewish festival of Sukkoth. "It is forbidden to harm the holy sites of religions and faiths," Peres said.

The Franciscan Custody of the Holy Land condemned the vandalism and called on Israel to act to stop it.

"The Christian community lives in Israel modestly and quietly, out of respect to the Jews and Muslims that reside with them in Israel. It is a shame that there are those who try and harm the relations of trust that were woven over the years between the different faiths," the Franciscan Custody said in a statement.

Earlier it posted a statement about the incident on the website of the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem, saying it was "distressed" with the vandalism.

"This is reminiscent of the graffiti sprayed in the Abbey of Latrun one month ago. Jesus is once again profaned and signed `price tag,' a characteristic mark of Israeli extremists," the statement said.

Shortly after Israel evacuated an illegally built West Bank settler outpost last month, vandals burned a door and spray-painted anti-Christian graffiti on the century-old Trappist Monastery in Latrun outside Jerusalem, with the words "Jesus is a monkey."

No arrests have been made.

Loading Slideshow...
  • Anti-Christian Graffiti

    A catholic priest looks at anti-Christian graffiti written in Hebrew at the Latrun Trappist Monastery where Israeli police say vandals overnight have spray-painted anti-Christian and pro-settler graffiti and set the monastery's door on fire, in Latrun, between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, Israel, Tuesday, Sept 4, 2012. Suspicion fell on Jewish settlers and their supporters who retaliate against anti-settlement measures, generally by attacking Palestinian property, but also by vandalizing Christian sites and Israeli military facilities. Earlier this week, the government ordered settlers out of two unauthorized enclaves in the West Bank. Some of the graffiti referred to unauthorized settler outposts and one read, "Jesus is a monkey." (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

  • Door Set On Fire

    A catholic monk stands in a doorway of the Latrun Trappist Monastery where Israeli police say vandals overnight have spray-painted anti-Christian and pro-settler graffiti and set the monastery's door on fire, in Latrun, between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, Israel, Tuesday, Sept 4, 2012. Suspicion fell on Jewish settlers and their supporters who retaliate against anti-settlement measures, generally by attacking Palestinian property, but also by vandalizing Christian sites and Israeli military facilities. Earlier this week, the government ordered settlers out of two unauthorized enclaves in the West Bank. Some of the graffiti referred to unauthorized settler outposts and one read, "Jesus is a monkey." (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

  • Priest Observes The Vandalism

    A catholic priest stands at a door to the Latrun Trappist Monastery where Israeli police say vandals overnight have spray-painted anti-Christian and pro-settler graffiti and set the monastery's door on fire, in Latrun, between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, Israel, Tuesday, Sept 4, 2012. Suspicion fell on Jewish settlers and their supporters who retaliate against anti-settlement measures, generally by attacking Palestinian property, but also by vandalizing Christian sites and Israeli military facilities. Earlier this week, the government ordered settlers out of two unauthorized enclaves in the West Bank. The Hebrew graffiti reads, "Jesus is a monkey." (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

  • Latrun Trappist Monastery

    A catholic priest walks in the grounds of the Latrun Trappist Monastery where Israeli police say vandals overnight have spray-painted anti-Christian and pro-settler graffiti and set the monastery's door on fire, in Latrun, between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, Israel, Tuesday, Sept 4, 2012. Suspicion fell on Jewish settlers and their supporters who retaliate against anti-settlement measures, generally by attacking Palestinian property, but also by vandalizing Christian sites and Israeli military facilities. Earlier this week, the government ordered settlers out of two unauthorized enclaves in the West Bank. Some of the graffiti referred to unauthorized settler outposts and one read, "Jesus is a monkey." (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)