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Rachel Maddow Calls Out Drudge Report For Attacking Obama On 'Overtly Racial Appeals' (VIDEO)

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Rachel Maddow tore into the conservative media on her Tuesday MSNBC show for attempting to make President Obama's race sound like what she called "shocking new news."

Maddow called out Drudge Report for "pulling out all the stops" for what she mockingly referred to as a "big, bombshell video" of Obama acknowledging his former pastor, Jeremiah Wright.

Drudge posted a five-year-old video of Obama speaking about Wright in 2007. Maddow lampooned the way Drudge teased what it considered to be the scandalous nature of the video.

Referring to the site's headlines surrounding the clip, Maddow said, "See this is supposed to make you believe that in this tape from before he was president, Barack Obama is revealing his secret plan to be way more black than he seems to be now."

Maddow then turned to Newt Gingrich's recent interview on Fox News. "If you want to make a racial reference bingo card here, like from the 1970's, the terms you're waiting for are: basketball, performer, the word rhythm, and you'll want a special bingo box for reference to the president as sleepy or lazy," Maddow said.

During Gingrich's interview with Fox News host Greta Van Susteren, the former Speaker of the House said the president is "not a real president," and for whatever reason, called out his enthusiasm for basketball.

"Back in 2008, the John McCain campaign had a choice about whether or not they should campaign on really overtly racial appeals, things like the Jeremiah Wright attack. And they chose not to in 2008," Maddow said. "If the Romney campaign is going to keep going there, along with the conservative media, which is going there whole-hog right now, can it work this year? Would it have worked in 2008? What does the right think are the lessons of John McCain not going there in 2008?"

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