ISTANBUL — Turkish artillery fired on Syrian targets after deadly shelling from Syria hit a Turkish border town on Wednesday, sharply raising tensions on a volatile border that has been crossed by tens of thousands of Syrian refugees fleeing violence in their country.

In a terse statement, the office of Turkey's prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, condemned shelling that hit the Turkish town of Akcakale, killing five local residents and wounding a dozen others. The shelling appeared to come from Syrian government forces who were fighting Syrian rebels backed by Turkey, which has called for the ouster of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Turkey's Anadolu agency said the dead included a woman, her three children and her friend.

"Our armed forces at the border region responded to this atrocious attack with artillery fire on points in Syria that were detected with radar, in line with the rules of engagement," the Turkish statement said.

"Turkey, acting within the rules of engagement and international laws, will never leave unreciprocated such provocations by the Syrian regime against our national security," it said.

Turkey's NTV television said Turkish radar pinpointed the positions from where the shells were fired on Akcakale, and that those positions were hit.

"Turkey is a sovereign country. There was an attack on its territory. There must certainly be a response in international law. ... I hope this is Syria's last craziness. Syria will be called into account," said Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc.

In Belgium, NATO's National Atlantic Council, which is composed of the national ambassadors, held an emergency meeting in Brussels on Wednesday night at Turkey's request to discuss the cross-border incident. The meeting ended with a statement strongly condemning the attack and saying: "the alliance continues to stand by Turkey and demands the immediate cessation of such aggressive acts against an ally." It also urged " the Syrian regime to put an end to flagrant violations of international law."

NATO also held an emergency meeting when a Turkish jet was shot down by Syria in June.

Turkey, a NATO ally, is anxious to avoid going into Syria on its own. It has been pushing for international intervention in the form of a safe zone, which would likely entail foreign security forces on the ground and a partial no-fly zone. However, the allies fear military intervention in Syria could ignite a wider conflict, and few observers expect robust action from the United States, which Turkey views as vital to any operation in Syria, ahead of the presidential election in November.

Turkey hosts more than 90,000 Syrian refugees in camps along its border, and also hosts Syrian opposition groups. There is concern in Turkey that the Syrian chaos could have a destabilizing effect on Turkey's own communities; some observers have attributed a sharp rise in violence by Kurdish rebels in Turkey to militant efforts to take advantage of the regional uncertainty.

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Don Melvin in Brussels contributed.

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  • In this Friday, Sept. 21, 2012, photo, a Syrian man looks at his mobile phone in the Bustan al-Qasr neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Friday that nearly 30,000 Syrians have been killed during the 18-month uprising against the Assad regime. (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo)

  • In this Saturday Sept. 22, 2012, photo, a Free Syrian Army soldier stands next to a dead body in front of Dar el-Shifa hospital in Aleppo, Syria. Partial translation in Arabic reads, "Free Syrian Army." (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo)

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  • In this Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012, file photo, a wounded woman, still in shock, leaves Dar El Shifa hospital in Aleppo, Syria. Two months into the battle for Syria's largest city, civilians are still bearing the brunt of the daily assaults of helicopter gunships, roaring jets and troops fighting in the streets. (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo, File)

  • Free Syrian Army fighter takes a rest in a hole on a building during an attack on Syrian Army positions in Aleppo, Syria, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)

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