HELSINKI (Reuters) - A senior Nokia executive in charge of product marketing has left the company, after a launch event last month for the company's new Lumia smartphones disappointed investors.

Ilari Nurmi, who was vice president of product marketing and responsible for the company's smartphone strategy, confirmed to Reuters in an email that he recently left the Finnish phone company.

He did not make clear whether he left of his own accord, and the company declined to comment on the circumstances of his departure.

He spoke to media last month when Nokia unveiled the Lumia 920, a top-of-the-range smartphone using Windows software. At the time, investors said they were disappointed by a lack of details such as launch dates and prices.

The success of Lumia phones is widely seen crucial for Nokia as it struggles to compete with rivals Apple and Samsung.

Once the world's biggest mobile phone maker, Nokia fell behind rivals in smartphones and racked up more than 3 billion euros in operating losses in the past 18 months.

It is pinning its hopes on a partnership with Microsoft Corp and its Windows Phone software, which powers around 3 percent of the global smartphone market while Google Inc's Android platform controls two-thirds of sales. Apple has under a quarter.

Nokia's new Lumia smartphones will go on sale in November, taking on the iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S III ahead of the Christmas season, but some analysts said the prices for the colourful handsets looked high.

The Lumia's launch was also marred by news that one of the ads misled viewers. TheVerge.com first reported that a video ad coinciding with the Lumia announcement was in fact not shot with the 920, and the company subsequently apologized.

(Reporting by Tarmo Virki and Ritsuko Ando; Editing by Hans-Juergen Peters)

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  • Contact Your Phone

    <a href="http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2363526,00.asp"target="_blank">PCMag</a> recommends using another phone to text your lost phone with a message offering a reward for the device, and you can always try calling it as well. If you don't have a phone handy, you can use a service like Skype, Google Voice or <a href="http://www.fonefindr.com/"target="_blank">fonefindr.com</a> to ping your phone. It can't hurt -- someone may have found your phone or maybe you'll find hear it ringing between the couch cushions.

  • Call Your Carrier

    After you've called or texted your phone, retraced your steps, and shed a few tears in frustration over losing your precious device, you'll want to call your cellphone carrier immediately and tell them your phone has been lost or stolen. Ask them to suspend service (i.e. disable messaging and calls) on the device, because thieves could rack up thousands of dollars in international calls or app purchases. AT&T will even let you do this from your <a href="http://www.wireless.att.com/answer-center/main.jsp?t=solutionTab&solutionId=KB63935"target="_blank">account on the Web</a>.

  • Password Protect Your Phone

    With all the messages, years of email, contacts, social networking accounts and other personal data stored on today's smartphones, we can't recommend password protecting your phone enough. Yes, it's a momentary frustration that requires you tap a few numbers every time you check your phone, but the extra security and peace of mind is worth the effort. While a thief could still wipe a password-protected device and there's always the possibility you just lost the phone for good, the alternative (going password-free) leaves not only your cellphone account but your bank, social networking, and e-mail accounts completely open. If your phone <em>was</em> stolen and you haven't locked it down, immediately change the passwords to your online accounts and alert any banks or services that you enabled on the phone.

  • Use Remote Protection Apps

    Many remote security apps are now available for modern smartphones, and they offer everything from near real-time location tracking (often showing your phone's location on a map via a Web interface) and the ability to remote wipe your phone in case of theft to remote photo and data backup. There are many free options, and they take just a few minutes to install and set up. Your corporate BlackBerry can probably be wiped and tracked by your company's IT admins, and consumers can grab the free BlackBerry Protect from <a href="http://us.blackberry.com/apps-software/protect/"target="_blank">BlackBerry App World</a> for remote tracking and wiping. iPhone users should download the free '<a href="http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/find-my-iphone/id376101648?mt=8"target="_blank">Find My iPhone</a>' app Android users can grab the free <a href="http://preyproject.com/"target="_blank">Prey</a> app. Similarly, other third party solutions like <a href="http://www.mobiledefense.com/"target="_blank">Mobile Defense</a>, <a href="https://www.mylookout.com/"target="_blank">Lookout</a> can help secure your device.

  • Save Your Phone's Unique ID

    Take a note of your phone's ESN, IMEI or MEID number (often found behind the battery or on the back of the iPhone near the FCC ID). This number will come in handy when reporting a lost or stolen phone to the police or to your cellphone provider.

  • Schedule Regular Backups

    It sounds obvious, but regularly back up your device to your computer to ensure that you don't lose essentials documents, purchases, apps and photos that are stored only on your phone. Even if you're forced to wipe your cellphone or if it's lost for good, you can often restore a factory fresh replacement to the last backup you've got, complete with apps, settings and documents. Depending on how much you use your phone, we recommend backing up between once a month and once a week.