One year ago, on this very day, Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died after a battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 56.

Jobs has been praised as a breathtaking genius and vilified as a morally bankrupt megalomaniac. He's been hailed a modern-day Nikola Tesla, and he's been slammed for being a "world-class jerk."

Hate him or love him, one thing is undeniable: Steve Jobs' far-reaching legacy is one that has changed the world we live in.

On Friday, as Apple marked the anniversary of Jobs' death with a moving video tribute, many others -- including tech writers, industry pundits, celebrities and Apple fans -- have spoken up in remembering the man and the legend, the hero and the scoundrel.

R.I.P Steve Jobs.

Click through this slideshow to read how others are remembering the tech mastermind on this day:

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  • Tim Cook, CEO of Apple

    "<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/05/steve-jobs-death-apple-tim-cook_n_1942311.html?1349445921&utm_hp_ref=technology">One of the greatest gifts Steve gave to the world is Apple</a>. No company has ever inspired such creativity or set such high standards for itself. Our values originated from Steve and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple. We share the same privilege and responsibility of carrying his legacy into the future." -- <em>on Steve Jobs' impact</em>

  • Hip Hop artist Tomm Dogg

  • Om Malik of Gigaom

    "[Steve] Jobs showed us that <a href="http://gigaom.com/apple/for-silicon-valley-a-reason-to-remember-steve-jobs/">conviction of a single person</a> can transform the world of even inanimate objects such as computers by focusing on simplicity and happiness." -- <em>on the genius of Steve Jobs</em>

  • Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post

  • Harry McCracken of Time Magazine

    "This hair-trigger tendency to see everything as a sign that the post-Jobs Apple is doomed, doomed, doomed gives lots of potentially reasonable Apple criticism an absurdist quality. I mean, anybody who contends that Tim Cook is doing a catastrophically crummy job as Apple CEO — maybe so badly that he should be fired, or even has Jobs riled up in Heaven — <a href="http://techland.time.com/2012/10/05/apple-without-steve-jobs-the-first-year-only-tells-us-so-much/">really ought to name at least one person who’d be better-suited to the gig</a>. Nobody ever does." -- <em>on Apple's future without Steve Jobs</em>

  • Monologist Mike Daisey

    "It feels hard to say it even now, but I can’t stop turning it over in my mind. <a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/10/05/mike-daisey-remembers-steve-jobs-a-year-after-his-death.html">I find myself thinking that Jobs’s death may the best thing that could’ve happened to Apple</a>." -- <em>on Steve Jobs and Apple</em>

  • Mat Honan of Wired

    "<a href="http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/10/what-we-talk-about-when-we-talk-about-steve-jobs/">[Steve] Jobs has joined the pantheon of greats who advanced science and industry and society itself</a> — a modern-day Tesla but appreciated in his own lifetime. He’s our Thomas Edison or Henry Ford, one of those rarefied individuals who had not only a vision but the will and force of personality to execute it through America’s greatest cultural triumph: the public corporation" -- <em>on the power of Steve Jobs' personality</em>

  • The Huffington Post

  • Pete Cashmore, Mashable

  • John Biggs of TechCrunch

    "<a href="http://techcrunch.com/2012/10/05/steve-jobs-a-year-later/">One year later we can’t forget him</a>. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. He made computers and phones and MP3 players. He wasn’t a political figure, a missionary, a healer. He was a guy who knew how to put software into hardware and make the whole as desirable to many as air." -- <em>on Steve Jobs' influence</em>


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