Oops? A group of teenagers who recently broke into a neighborhood house to throw a party got busted -- but it wasn't by the cops. The high school students unintentionally turned themselves in by posting photos of the party on Facebook, which the homeowner later found, according to the Today Show .

When a South Carolina father was away on vacation with his family, his son's classmates broke into his home through an unlocked window and threw a wild party. The partiers cleaned up after themselves and left the house in perfect condition -- with only a small broken screen as evidence -- but it was their Facebook party photos gave them away. The owner of the house recognized the rooms in which the teens were drinking and partying in the pictures.

"One of them was dancing around with a funnel in his hand. Another one was throwing up in the sink," the homeowner, who wishes to remain anonymous, told the Today Show. "A bunch of kids were laying all over the floor."

Months later, the police are now using tagged photos as evidence in their investigation of the break-in.

"If the kids weren't bragging about it or showing it off via Facebook, nothing would have come about from it," the homeowner said. "They would have gotten completely away with it."

And it's certainly not the first time that Facebook has led police to the scene of a party involving underage drinking. Last month, a series of out-of-control teen parties inspired by the film "Project X" were broken up by the police after public invites were sent out across social media platforms. A birthday party that attracted 4,000 teens in a small town in the Netherlands was busted when police caught wind of the Facebook invitation. And in Michigan, an invitation to a teen's party -- dubbed "Project M" -- went viral on Twitter, leading cops to raid the empty house where the party was just getting started at 11 a.m.