DAVIS, Calif. (AP) -- A dog that lost its snout while saving two girls in the Philippines has been brought to the University of California, Davis, where veterinarians will try to fix its injuries.

Surgeons at UC Davis' veterinary medical teaching hospital looked over the mixed breed dog named Kabang on Thursday.

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The San Francisco Chronicle reported that Kabang became a star in the Philippines after it got in front of a speeding motorcycle, saving the dog owner's young daughter and niece.

The crash took off the dog's snout and its upper jaw, and veterinarians in the Philippines were unable to treat the injury.

So Karen Kenngott, a critical care nurse from Buffalo, N.Y., spearheaded an online fundraising campaign for the dog's care.

Thursday's hour-long exam at UC Davis included blood and urine tests.

Surgeons determined that the dog will need at least two surgeries over the next six weeks - one procedure to focus on dental work and another to close the gaping wound on her face.

There were no plans to fit Kabang with a "prosthetic snout" or to replace the dog's jaw, the hospital said in a statement.

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  • In this Oct. 11, 2012 photo provided by the University of California - Davis, Dr. Anton Lim plays with Kabang the dog after its intake exam at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at UC Davis in Davis, Calif. Kabang lost her snout and upper jaw when she leapt in front of a motorcycle to save two little girls in the Philippines. UC Davis surgeons say Kabang will need multiple surgeries, but they are confident they can improve its condition. (AP Photo/UC Davis, Gregory Urquiaga)

  • In this August, 12, 2012 photo provided by the University of California - Davis, a Bunggal family member plays with Kabang the dog in the Philippines. The dog that lost its snout while saving two girls in the Philippines has been brought to the University of California, Davis, where veterinarians will try to fix its injuries. UC Davis surgeons say Kabang will need multiple surgeries, but they are confident they can improve its condition.(AP Photo/UC Davis, Anton Lim)

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