One small jump for Red Bull, one giant leap for business marketing: Red Bull Stratos may be the most successful marketing campaign of all time.

More than 8 million people worldwide watched YouTube's live stream on Sunday as Felix Baumgartner became the first person to break the sound barrier, starting in a freefall 128,000 feet above the Earth that reached a high speed of 833.9 miles per hour.

Meanwhile, Red Bull broke the traditional barriers of marketing, sponsorship and social media, skyrocketing from an energy drink known for providing a quick buzz to a big-time generator of international buzz that makes the endeavors of other marketing innovators like Apple look small by comparison.

The beauty of Red Bull Stratos is that it's not just a sensational stunt, but a business move that could translate into estimated sales of tens of millions of dollars, according to Ben Sturner, founder and CEO of Leverage Agency, a New York City-based sports, entertainment and media marketing company.

While a Red Bull spokesperson said the company doesn't release financials or marketing information, Sturner told The Huffington Post, "I wouldn't be surprised if they have a record month of sales. It was the lead story in newscasts, not just sportscasts, and they couldn't have the story without mentioning Red Bull. And with the buzz afterward and the engagement online, some of the top people on Twitter with millions of followers spreading the word about Red Bull -- that's [value] that can't be quantified."

The mass exposure, said Sturner, could translate to a change in customer behavior, "from buying a Rockstar or Monster to buying a Red Bull. At the end of the day, this brings in new customers, which brings in new money." The Austria-based company, founded by Dietrich Mateschitz in 1984, sold more than 4.6 billion cans of Red Bull worldwide in 2011.

According to ABC News, besides YouTube, the jump was shown by more than 40 TV stations and 130 digital outlets. Red Bull's Facebook post-jump photo of Baumgartner gained almost 216,000 likes, 10,000 comments and over 29,000 shares within 40 minutes, and half the worldwide trending topics on Twitter were related to Red Bull Stratos.

Sturner said the power of this marketing event lies in the synergy between the extreme event and the company's existing marketing message. The jump "hits the brand message spot on, which is that Red Bull gives you wings," he said.

It also helped that brand placement was ubiquitous. "You can't get a photo of Felix without the Red Bull logo and you can't talk about him without talking about Red Bull Stratos," Sturner said.

By creating an event that was so singular and creative, Red Bull tapped the potential to bypass the other gold standards of traditional marketing dominated by large corporations. "When you're in the Super Bowl, you're one of 70 ads or so. When you go around the NASCAR track, you're one of 44 teams," Sturner said. "This is about owning something that will leave an impression."

The project, which Baumgartner has been working on since 2005 with Red Bull on board as a sponsor, isn't the first time Red Bull has pushed the limits of marketing. The company is known for its buzz-oriented marketing geared toward youth, including extreme sports events such as the Red Bull Air Race, sports team ownerships including international Red Bull soccer teams and a Red Bull Records label.

But by nailing this attempt to redefine extreme, Red Bull Stratos gives small business marketers "something to consider," Sturner said. "How do you cut through the clutter and do something unique? See your brand as a story. Go big, take risks. Your brand could be on the front page of global media if you do something unusual."

In fact, Sturner thinks any small business could benefit by injecting more of the Red Bull mindset into its marketing. "Every brand has an attribute that could potentially be larger than life," he said. "You need something that will transcend. In this day and age, it's about engagement and amplification of the message, and Red Bull accomplished that in both ways."

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  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Baumgartner

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner is scheduled to attempt the highest parachute jump of all time on Oct. 9, 2012. Here, Baumgartner performs during the first high altitude test jump from an airplane in Taft, California on February 20, 2012.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Baumgartner during the high altitude test jump.

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    Baumgartner during a test jump from a helicopter, April 13, 2009.

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    Baumgartner leaps off the 508-meter high Taipei 101 Tower in Taiwan on December 11, 2008.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Baumgartner at the top of the Christ the Redeemer Statue near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on December 3, 2001. Before Stratos, Baumgartner was best known as a skydiver and BASE jumper.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Baumgartner during the first manned test flight of the capsule, February 23, 2012.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    The mission control during the first manned test flight.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    The Roswell, New Mexico launch location of the first test flight.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Baumgartner during the first test flight.

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    The capsule just before the second manned test flight, July 25, 2012.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    The capsule in the pressure chamber at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    The interior of the capsule in Lancaster, California on February 1, 2012.

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    Baumgartner during wind tunnel test on February 26, 2010.

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Retired Air Force Colonel Joe Kittinger with Baumgartner during a press conference in Salzburg, Austria on April 23, 2012. Kittinger holds the record for the highest-altitude jump, which he set in 1960. He is an advisor for the Stratos project and will relay messages to and from Baumgartner during the October jump attempt.

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    Kittinger just prior to his record setting jump from 102.800 feet in 1960. (U.S. Air Force Photo)

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    Kittinger

  • Felix Baumgartner's Supersonic Skydive Attempt

    Baumgartner undergoes scientific tests in Los Angeles, USA on June 11, 2012.

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    Screen shows brain waves of Baumgartner during scientific test session.

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    Baumgartner during the first manned test flight.

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    Baumgartner inside the capsule prior to the second manned test flight.

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    Baumgartner during training session in Lancaster, California, on February 22, 2012.

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    Crew members prepare the capsule for the second manned test flight.

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    Crew members fill the balloon with helium before the second manned test flight.

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    Baumgartner steps out of the capsule during the second manned test flight.

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    Mission Coordinator Mike Jacobs (L) and Kittinger (R) work during the second manned test flight.