Huffpost Politics

Mitt Romney's Campaign Begins To Pull Resources Out Of North Carolina

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MITT ROMNEY NORTH CAROLINA
Republican presidential candidate, former Gov. Mitt Romney greets supporters during a rally at Tidewater Community college in Chesapeake, Va., Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) | AP

Mitt Romney's campaign feels strongly enough about a win in North Carolina on Nov. 6 that it has begun transferring staff to other battleground states.

The Raleigh News & Observer reports:

Among those are who are being posted elsewhere in the final weeks of the campaign is Robert Reid, the chief Romney spokesman in North Carolina. "With the increasingly widening polls in North Carolina, we will continue to allocate resources, including key senior staff, to other states," said Michael Levoff, a Romney campaign spokesman.

"Our victory centers throughout the state will remain open and we expect our supporters and volunteers to remain engaged in our unprecedented get out the vote efforts through the election."

President Barack Obama won North Carolina by 14,000 votes in the 2008 presidential election, making him the first Democrat to take the state since 1976.

His reelection campaign said it remained confident about the president's chances of another victory in the Tar Heel State.

"We feel confident in our operation there and we're continuing to compete for every single vote," Jen Psaki, the campaign's traveling press secretary, told CNN.

Obama campaign national press secretary Ben LaBolt also reacted to the news, tweeting, "Interesting that the GOP is pulling out of NC the day early vote begins and Obama supporters are lined up around the block at the polls."

Currently, The Huffington Post's Election Dashboard estimates Romney leading Obama 49 to 46 percent in North Carolina. The number takes into account all publicly available polling on the race.

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