U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-Ill.) has had a rough week -- and the negative attention is apparently causing his doctors to recommend the congressman's return to the Mayo Clinic.

According to the Chicago Sun-Times' Michael Sneed, Jackson may be heading back to Mayo. Jackson, according to Sneed's source, "is finding it difficult to continue his treatment because the press is staking out his home and making access to his doctor, who is within a short walking distance from his home, incredibly hard."

The Chicago Democrat disappeared from the public eye over four months ago before going on an extended medical leave to receive treatment for bipolar disorder and related depression and gastrointestinal issues. Jackson returned to his D.C. home from the clinic early last month and, according to a Gawker report, was recently spotted drinking at a bar near his home on two separate occasions.

Aside from telling a reporter with The Daily last week that he is "not well" and continues to see his doctor twice daily, Jackson has not spoken publicly about his condition or when he plans to return to work in Washington.

Jackson remains on the Nov. 6 ballot and appears to be a shoo-in for re-election, even though he has not campaigned publicly. Nevertheless, according to an NBC Chicago report, his campaign has spent $1 million since 2011, nearly the same amount as U.S. Rep. Judy Biggert, who is in the midst of a heated race. CBS Chicago reports that $110,099 has been spent by Jackson's campaign since the congressman's leave began on June 10.

Among the Jackson campaign's expenditures, according to NBC, are fees paid to a political consulting firm owned by his wife, Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson. Though the payments are legal, they "raise ethical questions," the Better Government Association's Andy Shaw told the station.

Jackson's silence has continued in the face of a new federal investigation into "suspicious activity" concerning the congressman's campaign finances. According to the Chicago Tribune, the Federal Bureau of Investigation is looking into $8,000 Jackson's campaign spent on office furniture from a suburban furniture company in September 2010.

The new federal probe, which began shortly before the congressman went on leave, is unrelated to an ongoing "pay-to-play" ethics investigation concerning whether Jackson was aware of efforts to raise money for imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich in exchange for his appointment to the Senate in 2008.

Earlier on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Jesse Jackson Jr.

    FILE - In this March 21, 2010 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., uses his PDA to photograph demonstrators outside on the U.S. Capitol as the House prepares to vote on health care reform in Washington. When Jackson disappeared on a mysterious medical leave in June 2012, it took weeks for anyone in Washington to notice. Jackson has never lived up to the high expectations on the national stage.

  • Jesse Jackson, Jr.

    FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2011 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is pictured before a ceremonial swearing in of the Congressional Black Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington.

  • Jesse Jackson Jr.

    FILE - In this May 16, 2011 file photo, U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. attends ceremonies for Chicago Mayor-elect Rahm Emanuel in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

  • Jesse Jackson Jr.

    FILE - In this Tuesday, March 20, 2012 file photo, U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., thanks supporters at his election night party in Chicago. Jackson's office announced Monday, June 25, 2012 in a news release that the congressman has been on a medical leave of absence since June 10 and is being treated for exhaustion. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

  • Jesse Jackson Jr., Sandi Jackson

    U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., and his wife Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson, thank family members at his election night party Tuesday, March 20, 2012, in Chicago after his Democratic primary win over challenger, former Rep. Debbie Halvorson, in the Illinois' 2nd District. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

  • Jesse Jackson Jr., Sandi Jackson

    U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., and his wife Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson, embrace at his election night party Tuesday, March 20, 2012, in Chicago after his Democratic primary win over challenger, former Rep. Debbie Halvorson, in the Illinois' 2nd District. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

  • Timothy Geithner, Jesse Jackson Jr.

    Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, right, declines an offer by U.S. Rep Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., to talk to reporters during a tour of the Ford Motor Company Stamping Plant in Chicago Heights, Ill., Wednesday, April 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., Sandi Jackson

    U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. and his wife, Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson, ask each other for their support and votes as they arrive at a polling station for early voting, Friday, March 9, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)