Police in Japan said Monday that a U.S. sailor was found dead at a train station in Nagasaki Prefecture over the weekend.

The sailor, identified as Petty Officer 2nd Class Samuel Lewis Stiles, was found on a train platform at Haiki Station at 5 a.m. Sunday.

Stiles, 25, reportedly had no personal belongings on him and was dressed in civilian clothes. However, CNN reports that the sailor was discovered "surrounded by [several] alcoholic drink cans."

The news agency continues:

The death, which police say they are investigating as either an accident or a crime, comes at a delicate time for the U.S. military in Japan after two U.S. sailors were arrested earlier this month on accusations they raped a local woman.

That case provoked an angry reaction from Japanese officials, and the U.S. military responded by imposing a curfew on its troops in Japan. The curfew restricted military personnel to bases, personal homes or hotels between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m.

It is thought that Stiles may have been out in breach of this curfew the night he died.

According to Chinese news agency Xinhua, Stiles may have died after climbing on top of a "stationary train." The young man may have fallen off the train after getting electrocuted by an overhead power line.

“There will be an investigation obviously,” Commander Naval Forces Japan spokesman Jon Nylander said, according to news website Stars and Stripes.

The website adds that when Stiles was found, his forehead was discovered to have been "bleeding and part of his windbreaker was burnt." There were, however, no signs of violence.

For more, watch this Japanese news report (unsubtitled):

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • In this, Sunday, Oct. 21, 2012, photo, an Indian performer disguised as Hindu Goddess Kali performs with fire during Navratri festival in Allahabad, India. Navratri or the festival of nine nights is an annual Hindu festival of worship and dance. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • A driver maneuvers his classic American car along a wet road as a wave crashes against the Malecon in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

  • Helmut Kirchmeier, who plays Hannibal, from the controversial Circus of Horrors rehearses ahead of their Halloween weekend performances at Wookey Hole on October 24, 2012 in Wells, England. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • Two women kiss in front of people taking part in a demonstration called by the 'Alliance VITA' association against gay marriage and adoption by same-sex couples on October 23, 2012, in Marseille, southeastern France. (GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Tourists Alexandre Casias, center back, and Emilie Vachon, not in photo, from Montreal in Canada, have their car raided by Baboons, at Millers Point on the outskirts of Cape Town, South Africa, Wednesday, Oct 24, 2012. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

  • Clowns pose for the official photo as part of the XVII th Clown Convention in Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

  • Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy of Germany skate in the pairs short program at the 2012 Skate Canada International ISU Grand Prix event in Windsor, Canada, on October 26, 2012. (GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Dancers perform at a Democrat campaign rally, Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012, in San Antonio. Former President Bill Clinton spoke on behalf of fellow democrats at the event. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • Kirtsy Nicholstan, from the controversial Circus of Horrors, rehearses in her role as a pickled person in a jar ahead, of their Halloween weekend performances at Wookey Hole on October 24, 2012, in Wells, England. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • In this Oct. 23, 2012 photo provided by the United Nations, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, laughing with Korean rapper PSY during a photo opportunity at the U.N. headquarters in New York. (AP Photo/United Nations, Eskinder Debebe)