Are you waiting with bated breath for iTunes 11? If so, you'll have to wait a bit longer.

In September, Apple told the world that the newest version of its music-playing software was coming in late October. But on Tuesday, with only a single day left in the month, Apple announced that the upgrade would have to wait another month.

"The new iTunes is taking longer than expected and we wanted to take a little extra time to get it right," Apple spokesman Tom Neumayr told tech blog AllThingsD. "We look forward to releasing this new version of iTunes with its dramatically simpler and cleaner interface, and seamless integration with iCloud before the end of November."

The redesign was expected to be the biggest overhaul to iTunes since its launch in 2003, according to sources that spoke with Bloomberg News. During a September event, Apple's Eddy Cue promised a "dramatically simpler" iTunes, with improved performance and a long-awaited "Up Next" feature that lets users cue up songs.

Even up to the tech giant's third-quarter earnings call last week, Apple bragged about the revamp without mentioning a potential delay.

"We look forward to looking to launching a redesigned iTunes," Apple CFO Peter Oppenheimer told investors during the call. "The new iTunes has a dramatically simpler and cleaner interface."

Some have speculated that a reason for the delay was the recent announcement that iOS Senior Vice President Steve Forstall is stepping down from his role and will eventually leave Apple. But AllThingsD's Peter Kafka threw cold water on that theory.

"[I]t’s worth pointing out that Forstall wasn’t in charge of iTunes — it falls under media boss Eddy Cue," Kafka wrote.

Another theory goes that Apple needs time to wrap into iTunes an Internet radio service, similar to Pandora, that the company is rumored to be developing.

In 2010, Apple introduced iTunes 10, a version that included music-sharing feature Ping, which proved unpopular and was discontinued this year.

Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • Smuggle Truck: Operation Immigrant

    Boston-based developer Owlchemy Labs irked immigrant advocate groups with this iPhone game that allows users to drive a <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/28/smuggle-truck-operation-immigration-rejected-by-apple_n_854899.html" target="_hplink">truck full of immigrants</a> through the desert. According to the AP, "[Developer Alex] Schwartz said he wanted to bring attention to immigration issues." But Apple banned the app from the App Store.

  • Phantom Alert

    U.S. Senators Chuck Schumer, Frank Lautenberg, Tom Udall and Harry Reid pressured Apple, Google and RIM earlier this spring to remove smartphone apps that notify users of nearby police <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/23/senators-ask-apple-to-ban-dui-checkpoint-alert-apps_n_839300.html" target="_hplink">DUI checkpoints</a>. Apple and RIM have since <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/06/09/apple-dui-checkpoint-apps-ban_n_874532.html" target="_hplink">complied</a> with the Seantors' demands and cracked on so-called "DUI checkpoint" apps, but Google has yet to take action.

  • Exodus International

    Despite initially passing Apple's standards, the allegedly anti-gay messages promoted by the app "<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/23/apple-exodus-international-app_n_839448.html" target="_hplink">Exodus International</a>" outraged thousands of customers. The Exodus International ministry, from which the app takes its name, <a href="http://blog.exodusinternational.org/about/http://blog.exodusinternational.org/about/" target="_hplink">promotes</a> "freedom from homosexuality through the power of Jesus Christ." After more than 150,000 signatures were gathered for an online petition, Apple removed the app from the App Store entirely.

  • Playboy

    Hugh Hefner claimed in January that "Playboy" would soon come <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/21/playboy-ipad-app-blocked-_n_812489.html" target="_hplink">uncensored on the iPad</a>. Apple, however, remains firm on its nudity-free policy within the App Store and forced "Playboy" to resort to a low resolution web app instead.

  • Wikileaks

    The <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2010/12/20/apple-removes-wikileaks-app-from-app-store/" target="_hplink">unofficial WikiLeaks application</a> lasted only three days in the App Store before being banned by Apple.

  • 'The Importance Of Being Earnest'

    Apparently Apple's censors worried that Tom Bouden's graphic novel version of Oscar Wilde's <em><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/06/14/apple-censors-gay-kiss-in_n_611553.html" target="_hplink">The Importance of Being Earnest</a></em>, which portrays illustrations of nude or partially nude men embracing, would be too objectionable for too many users. Apple approved the app, but only with black boxes covering controversial frames. However, the App Store later reversed its decision and passed the app without the censor bars.

  • Big Brother Camera Security

    In 2010, Apple approved the <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/06/15/apple-bans-big-brother-camera-security-iphone-passcodes_n_877481.html" target="_hplink">Big Brother Camera Security app</a>, which lets users remotely photograph someone who is improperly trying to access their stolen or lost iPhone. In June 2010, however, the app was removed from the App Store following accusations that the developer was "surreptitiously harvesting user passwords."

  • ThirdIntifada

    Apple removed the app called "<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/06/23/apple-removes-anti-israel-thirdintifada-app_n_882857.html" target="_hplink">ThirdIntifada</a>" from the App Store, following complaints made by Israel's information minister, Yuli Edelstein and Jewish human rights group Simon Wiesenthal Center. The app was said to promote violence against Israel, according to claims.

  • Manhattan Declaration

    Apple initially approved so-called "anti-gay" app <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/11/24/apple-manhattan-declaration-app_n_788075.html" target="_hplink">Manhattan Declaration</a>, but the App Store later removed the program following a wave of complaints--and a petition--from outraged customers. The app asked users to sign a "declaration," which according to the app "speaks in defense of the sanctity of life, traditional marriage, and religious liberty."