A nor'easter bound for New England may be brewing, and it could hit as early as Election Day, according to a preliminary forecast from the National Weather Service.

The preliminary extended forecast issued by the agency's Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) Thursday morning noted that the possible nor'easter will likely be "much less extreme" than Hurricane Sandy, and it would produce effects away from the regions hardest hit by the superstorm.

"At this time it looks as though coastal impacts would be farther north along the New England coast than we saw with Sandy. Snowfall would be confined to northern New England," the Weather Channel noted.

AccuWeather meteorologists said the nor'easter might inconvenience voters -- particularly in areas most affected by Sandy -- if it hits on Election Day. Days after the storm, crews are still working to restore power to more than 6 million people who lost it. Tens of thousands of residents also have been displaced from their homes.

In a poll conducted by Ipsos for the Weather Channel in late August, a third of undecided voters said bad weather on Election Day would prevent them from voting.

However, the impact of weather might be offset by early voting in some states. Up to 40 percent of people are expected to vote early this year, CBS News reported.