MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- The National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis plans to open the balcony where Martin Luther King Jr. was shot to the public.

The museum was built around and includes the old Lorraine Motel, where King was staying when he was assassinated in 1968. Visitors had been able to see the balcony where King was shot but couldn't stand on it.

The museum's main building will close at the end of the day Monday for renovations. Officials hope to open the balcony to the public on Nov. 19, and they're installing a lift for disabled visitors.

A museum annex that includes the boardinghouse from which James Earl Ray shot at King also will be open during the renovation.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Quotes: Famous Quotations From MLK's Speeches, Letters And Sermons (VIDEO)
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  • I Have A Dream (1963)

    "I Have a Dream" is a 17-minute public speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered on August 28, 1963, in which he called for racial equality and an end to discrimination.

  • I've Been To The Mountaintop (1968)

    "I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the popular name of the last speech delivered by Martin Luther King, Jr. The speech primarily concerns the Memphis Sanitation Strike. King calls for unity, economic actions, boycotts, and nonviolent protest, and challenges the United States to live up to its ideals. At the end of the speech, he discusses the possibility of an untimely death.

  • Beyond Vietnam: A Time To Break Silence (1967)

    By 1967, King had become the country's most prominent opponent of the Vietnam War, and a staunch critic of overall U.S. foreign policy, which he deemed militaristic. In his "Beyond Vietnam" speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 -- a year to the day before he was murdered -- King called the United States "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today."

  • We Shall Overcome (1966)

  • How Long? Not Long! (1965)

    "How Long, Not Long" is the popular name given to the public speech delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on the steps of the State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama, after the successful completion of the Selma to Montgomery March on March 25, 1965. The speech is also sometimes referred to as "Our God Is Marching On!"

  • Drum Major Instinct Pt. 1 (1967)

    In his last sermon -- "The Drum Major Instinct," Dr. King encouraged his congregation to seek greatness, but to do so through service and love.

  • Drum Major Instinct Pt. 2 (1967)