Miami-Dade County may have added 809 polling places to its 20 highly congested early voting locations, but it didn't solve the hours-long lines that made headlines over the weekend.

As polls began closing Tuesday night, several were facing the prospect of serving lines of voters into what could be the wee hours of Wednesday. Precincts in Hialeah and Kendall ballooned with waits of 5 hours or more, and in Brickell polls at the UTD Towers were bogged down with nearly 7-hour lines -- with hundreds of voters still waiting to cast votes hours after cutoff.

Get live updates from Election Day in Miami-Dade below:

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  • Voters line up in the dark to cast their ballots at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Miami. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

  • Voters line up in the dark to beat the 7:00 p.m. deadline to cast their ballots at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Miami. Florida voters queued up before dawn Tuesday to cast their ballots as long lines began forming at some precincts across the state. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

  • Marta Nieto

    Marta Nieto, right, of Miami, makes a phone call after learning that she missed the deadline to cast her ballot at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Miami. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

  • A worker prepares boxes of absentee ballots to be scanned at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Doral, Fla. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

  • Workers prepare to scan in boxloads of absentee ballots at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Doral, Fla. Florida voters queued up before dawn Tuesday to cast their ballots as long lines began forming at some precincts across the state. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

  • Workers scan in absentee ballots at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Doral, Fla. Florida voters queued up before dawn Tuesday to cast their ballots as long lines began forming at some precincts across the state. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

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  • Voters wait in line in front of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Lauderhill, Fla. on Tuesday, Nov. 6th, 2012. (AP Photo/The Miami Herald, Joe Rimkus Jr.)

  • A woman casts her vote at Hialeah Fire Station #5 in Hialeah, Fla. on Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/El Nuevo Herald, David Santiago) MAGS OUT

  • Ana Ortiz, 67, waits in line to cast her vote Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Hialeah, Fla. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • A voter marks her ballot in Hialeah, Fla., on Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Voters line up to cast their ballots at the Southwest Regional Library, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Pembroke Pines, Fla. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/The Miami Herald,Joe Rimkus Jr. ) MAGS OUT

  • Voters cast their ballots at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Miami. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/The Miami Herald, Tim Chapman) MAGS OUT

  • Angel Cambara, left, and Clara Alonso, second from left, wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Miami. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/The Miami Herald, Tim Chapman) MAGS OUT

  • Voters wait in line tocast their ballots at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Miami. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/The Miami Herald, Tim Chapman) MAGS OUT

  • Souls to the Polls Early Voting

  • Voters read the a sample ballot as they wait in line to cast their vote in Hialeah, Fla., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Americans are heading into polling places across the country Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Ana Ortiz, 67-years-old, waits in line as she prepares to cast her vote in Hialeah, Fla., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Americans are heading into polling places across the country Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • FILE - This Oct. 29, 2012 file photo shows people standing in line to vote in the presidential election, in Miami. There’s always grousing about people who don’t bother to vote. But look at it another way: An estimated 133 million Americans will cast ballots in Tuesday’s election. That’s about 6 in 10 eligible adults. Some will persevere despite long lines, pressing personal burdens or the devastation left by Superstorm Sandy. Why do they do it? It’s not because any one voter will decide the contest between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Depending on which state they live in, the odds of casting a deciding vote for president are somewhere between 1 in a million and essentially zero. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

  • Voters stand in line to pick up their absentee ballots in Doral, Fla., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Christina White, deputy supervisor with Miami-Dade County, said the county also decided to accept absentee ballots for four hours on Sunday at its main office. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Diana Camacho, left, chants “we want to vote,” after the elections office in Miami-Dade County closed its doors to voters who waited in long lines for an absentee ballot in Doral, Fla., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. The doors were reopened after the voters in line demanded to vote. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Myrna Peralta, left, and other voters react after the elections office in Miami-Dade County reopened its doors to voters who waited in long lines for an absentee ballot in Doral, Fla., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. The doors were closed after election officials were overwhelmed by the size of the crowd Sunday. With limited staff and one printer, election officials decided to shut down the main office, doors were reopened after voters protested and demanded to exercise their right to vote. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Jorge Estomba, district director of Move On, talks to reporetrs after the elections office in Miami-Dade County closed its doors to voters who waited in long lines for an absentee ballot in Doral, Fla., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. The doors were reopened after the voters in line demanded to vote. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • South Floridians stand in line during the last day of early voting in Miami, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012. Despite record turnout in many parts of the state, Florida Gov. Rick Scott rejected calls to extend early voting through Sunday to help alleviate long lines at the polls. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • South Floridians stand in line during the last day of early voting in Miami, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012. Despite record turnout in many parts of the state, Florida Gov. Rick Scott rejected calls to extend early voting through Sunday to help alleviate long lines at the polls. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Voters stand in line during the fourth day of early voting in North Miami, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, as Floridians cast their ballot seven days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at a polling station setup at the City of Miami City Hall on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Voters stand in line during the fourth day of early voting in Miami, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, as Floridians cast their ballot seven days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Edriss Montrose

    People wait to in line to vote early on Sunday, Oct. 28,2012 in Miami. Organizers say at least 135 Florida churches participated Sunday in "souls to the polls" bus and car caravans aimed at getting mostly Latino and African-American congregations to cast ballots early. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

  • FILE - This Oct. 29, 2012 file photo shows people standing in line to vote during early voting for the presidential election, in Miami. One week before a close election, superstorm Sandy has confounded the presidential race, halting early voting in many areas, forcing both candidates to suspend campaigning and leading many to ponder whether the election might be postponed. It could take days to restore electricity to all of the more than 8 million homes and businesses that lost power when the storm pummeled the East Coast. That means it’s possible that power could still be out in some states on Election Day _ a major problem for areas that rely on electronic voting machines. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

  • People stand in line to vote early Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Pembroke Pines, Fla. On the only Sunday that Florida polls will be open for early voting this election cycle, faith leaders from 44 congregations in six Florida cities will lead their congregations to early voting locations in a massive "Souls to the Polls" effort to mobilize faith voters. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

  • Betty Gray

    Betty Gray stands in line to vote early, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 in Miami at a "Souls to the Polls" rally. Organizers say at least 135 Florida churches on Sunday participated in "souls to the polls", a program of bus and car caravans aimed at getting mostly Latino and African-American congregations to cast ballots early. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at a polling station setup in the Miami-Dade County elections departmnet building on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in Florida, one of the important swing states, is held for eight straight 12-hour days leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at a polling station setup at the City of Miami City Hall on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election.. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • South Florida voters line up to vote at the John F. Kennedy Library in Hialeah, Fla., Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012. Special polling places opened throughout the state Saturday and will be open daily for the next week. Poll times vary by county. This year's early voting period is shorter than in previous elections. Voting rights groups concerned about problems with access unsuccessfully challenged the reduced time frame in the courts. Officials say more than 1.1 million Floridians have already cast ballots through mail-in absentee voting. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at a polling station setup at the City of Miami City Hall on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • South Florida voters line up to vote in Miami, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012. Special polling places opened throughout the state Saturday and will be open daily for the next week. Poll times vary by county. This year's early voting period is shorter than in previous elections. Voting rights groups concerned about problems with access unsuccessfully challenged the reduced time frame in the courts. Officials say more than 1.1 million Floridians have already cast ballots through mail-in absentee voting. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters fill out their ballots as they cast their vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting, at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Early Voting Starts In Florida

    MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 27: Early voters wait in line to vote in the presidential election on the first day of early voting at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center on October 27, 2012 in Miami, Florida. Early voting in one of the important swing states is held for eight straight 12-hour days, leading up to the November 6 general election. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Voters receive ballots after election inspectors check their identification during the fourth day of early voting in Miami on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, one week before Election Day. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • A unidentified voter checks her ballot as she prepares to cast her vote during the fourth day of early voting in Miami on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, one week before Election Day. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • Keith Porro, Austin

    Keith Porro and his son, Austin, stand beside their campaign trailer, filled with signs and poster, outside an early voting site in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as he campaigns for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. On the only Sunday that Florida polls will be open for early voting this election cycle, faith leaders from 44 congregations in six Florida cities will lead their congregations to early voting locations in a massive “Souls to the Polls” effort to mobilize faith voters. Organizers of the event estimate more than 2,000 faith voters, mostly African-American and Latino, will vote early as a result of the coordinated, state-wide event. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

  • Betty James

    Betty James holds a sign outside the Faith Community Baptist Church in Miami, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 as she tries to rally churchgoers to board a bus that would take them to vote early. On the only Sunday that Florida polls will be open for early voting this election cycle, faith leaders from 44 congregations in six Florida cities will lead their congregations to early voting locations in a massive “Souls to the Polls” effort to mobilize faith voters. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

  • A man votes during early voting for the presidential election, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Miami. About 1.9 million Floridians have already cast ballots eight days before Election Day, Nov 6. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

  • Victoria Pendleton, Cara Porter

    Victoria Pendleton, left, stands next to Cara Porter as they ride a bus to vote early Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 in the "Souls to Polls" rally in Miami. Organizers of the event say at least 135 Florida churches participated in the programs of bus and car caravans aimed at getting mostly Latino and African-American congregations to cast ballots early. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

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Technically this liveblog ended yesterday, but we think it deserves one last item: this tweet, from Florida Secretary of State spokesman Chris Cate, which should indicate just how heroic Miamians were last night in their determination to be counted. Incredible challenge, incredible response.

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Ohio toppled America for Barack Obama -- even as Miami-Dade residents were still voting. Thanks for following our liveblog, Miami! We'll have more from local races Wednesday morning.

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@ doug_hanks : Right now official Fla. margin of about 36,000 votes would be enough for an automatic recount (half a percentage point margin), lawyers say

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Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections Penelope Townsley has said there will not be a final tally for the county until Wednesday, with approximately 300 people still in line to vote at 11 p.m. Tuesday night.

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Katherine Culliton-González, senior attorney and director of voter protection for the Advancement Project, a civil rights group, reported to HuffPost problems in two precincts. She said that she had to return to one North Miami precinct three times to assist poll workers.

In one instance, elderly residents and residents with literacy issues had sought out help from Advancement Project staff. Poll watchers intervened and tried to prevent them from assisting these voters, Culliton-González said.

The same precinct also did not have a bilingual poll worker. An election protection worker was asked to help translate. That worker was promptly kicked out of the precinct. After much back and forth, she was allowed back in," she said. But then was evicted a second time. The polling staff eventually allowed her back in.

The protection worker, Betsy Aguirre, said that she had tried to help a Spanish-speaking voter and another who had trouble reading the ballot before getting evicted. She said that in the morning, the precinct claimed they did not have any sample ballots that could have assisted voters. Hours later, the samples were discovered.

In another precinct, Culliton-González said a GOP lawyer managed to get inside the voting area. "The voters and the poll workers were all people of color," she explained. "She bullied her way in." The lawyer was eventually kicked out.

All the voters stuck it out and voted, she believes. "Luckily the voters were not intimidated," she said. "We didn't have anyone leave. Election protections were there."

--Jason Cherkis

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miami after dark

Voters line up in the dark to beat the 7:00 p.m. deadline to cast their ballots at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Miami. Florida voters queued up before dawn Tuesday to cast their ballots as long lines began forming at some precincts across the state. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

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A ballot measure in Florida that would have erased women's right to reproductive "privacy" from the state constitution was defeated on Tuesday by a margin of 56 to 44 percent, according to CNN. The measure, put on the ballot by Republican state legislators, would have empowered the state to enforce abortion restrictions, such as mandatory ultrasound laws, and would have enabled state lawmakers to ban abortion altogether if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

“We commend the voters of Florida for joining what has become a national movement to wholly reject these attacks on reproductive freedom and to demand stronger protections for reproductive rights,” Nancy Northup, president and CEO at the Center for Reproductive Rights, said in a statement. “By preserving women’s reproductive rights under the Florida state constitution, women and families will continue to have all options available to them so they can make the best health care decisions for their circumstances."

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A glimpse of today's latest Debacle in Dade: lines of 5 and 6-hour waits. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of voters still remain in line to cast ballots -- hours after polls began closing.

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meanwhile the u on abc

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Miamians may be forced to wait in hours-long lines all the time, but they won't ever go without Cuban coffee. Service continued late Tuesday evening as 200 people still in line in Sweetwater were served a pizza dinner with cafecitos.

photo2photo3

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@ RoblesHerald : Elections department reported 800 people in line in South Kendall #HeraldVote

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@ PatriciaMazzei : At least 300 people in line at Goulds Church of Christ in South Miami-Dade. People bringing coffee, water to voters waiting. #heraldvote

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With more results flooding in, it isn't looking good for embattle U.S. Rep. David Rivera (R), who's losing now to Democratic challenger Joe Garcia 43-53 percent.

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With less than 1 percent reporting, Barack Obama leads in Florida 50.2 percent - 49.1 percent. Keep an eye on things with our fabulous map!

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Ready for the first numbers of the night in Miami-Dade? Here they come! A count of only previously-received absentee ballots shows Barack Obama with a 382 vote advantage over Mitt Romney:

Romney 96,910 (49.66%)

Obama 97,292 (49.86%)

Mack 85,368 (45.85%)

Nelson 98,183 (52.73%)

Interestingly, results also show embattled U.S. Rep. David Rivera (R) with a 52-44 lead over challenger Joe Garcia (D). Get full early absentee results here: http://huff.to/TtAeNG

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@ WPTV : CNN reports, FL early exit polls show Latino voters make up 16% of electorate, up from 14% in 2008.

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miami votes

Matt Novick, of Southwest Ranches, comes prepared to wait in line with his own chair because of severe back problems, Tuesday, November 6, 2012, at the Southwest Regional Library in Pembroke Pines, Florida. (Joe Rimkus Jr./Miami Herald/MCT via Getty Images)

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@ terrymurphy06 : @DeFede young couple with two kids just walked away from Miami Lakes precinct upon hearing 2.5 hours to vote.

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@ DeFede : Just interviewed President Obama. He wouldn't predict a Florida win but said: "I think it is going to be incredibly close." #cbs4votes

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voting line south miami

"Voting at my old high school..." South Miami Senior High, South Miami

Photo credit: Ana Rusch

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Voting in Florida hasn't been easy -- again -- but there'll be no mascara'd face behind a podium if things go south. Florida's current Secretary of State is former beer lobbyist Ken Detzner, whom the Miami Herald reports has a more "muted" demeanor:

“We’re not going to have a Katherine Harris problem,” says Guy Spearman, a lobbyist and longtime friend of Detzner.

“Unlike Katherine, who was arrogant, he’s exceedingly politically astute from having worked in Tallahassee so long,” Spearman said. “We’re hearing all the time that it’s us and Ohio who will decide this, us and Ohio, so there’s no doubt, Ken’s got a tough job ahead of him. But he’s up to it.”

But voter rights groups have already clashed with Detzner, who was appointed to his $140,000-a-year post by Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) -- a man who knows a little about trying to pare down votes in the Sunshine State. Read more at the Herald.

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@ MarcACaputo : UTD Towers on Brickell in downtown Miami: 6.5-hour for some. This was one of the last precincts to close in FL in 08. What did we learn?

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Boca News Now reports:

A woman attempting to vote in West Boca Raton this morning was initially prohibited from entering the polling place because she was wearing a tee shirt with the letters MIT.

BocaNewsNow.com has heard from multiple sources that an election supervisor at the polling place ultimately realized that MIT stands for “Massachusetts Institute of Technology” — a school where students tend to know how to spell — and was not a campaign shirt for the Republican candidate, who spells his name MITT.

[...]

The woman was ultimately allowed to vote.

Read more here.

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