Mia Love conceded in a hotly contested congressional race against incumbent Rep. Jim Matheson (D) in Utah's 2nd congressional district.

Love, a rising star in the Republican party who had a prominent speaking role during August's party convention, was narrowly defeated, Fox-13 reports. According to The Hill, Love lost by fewer than 3,000 votes.

For up-to-the-minute Election Day news, scroll down to HuffPost's live blog below.

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HuffPost's Andrea Stone reports:

WASHINGTON -- Exit polls indicate that President Barack Obama received 69 percent of the Jewish vote Tuesday. Partisans have just begun to argue whether that was an overwhelming endorsement or the latest evidence that one of the Democratic Party's most reliable constituencies is becoming less so with every presidential election.

Read the full story here.

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HuffPost's Tyler Kingkade reports:

NEW YORK -- Mitt Romney lost the youth vote by a huge margin, and with it, he lost the presidency.

Sixty percent of young voters who cast ballots chose to reelect President Barack Obama, against the 36 percent who voted for Mitt Romney. That's a six point slide in youth support for Obama from 2008, but still nearly triple the margin of victory for the youth vote that John Kerry won over George W. Bush in 2004.

An analysis by the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University found that had the youth vote been split 50-50 for the presidential race in just four states -- Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Virginia -- Romney would have been elected president. In each of those four crucial swing states, exit polling shows young voters made up 16 to 19 percent of the electorate.

According to the National Journal, Republicans had counted on the youth vote to be held to just 15 or 16 percent of the electorate in order to secure a Romney victory.

But CIRCLE estimates 22 to 23 million people between the ages of 18 and 29 nationwide voted this election. Exit polls show voters ages 18 to 29 made up 19 percent of the electorate, a 1-point increase from 2008.

"It is because [Romney] lost the youth vote pretty decisively that he will not be the next president of the United States," said CIRCLE's director, Peter Levine.

Read the full story here.

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Hours after President Barack Obama declared that the nation needs to fix the problem of long lines at the voting booth, a survey by Hart Research, commissioned by the AFL-CIO, found that minorities and Democrats were more likely to experience long wait times than others.

Nearly a quarter of blacks -- 24 percent -- and Hispanics -- 22 percent -- reported waiting in line more than 30 minutes, compared to 9 percent of whites. Obama voters were nearly twice as likely as Romney voters to face long lines, at 16 percent to 9 percent.

-- Dan Froomkin

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@ jonathanweisman : I hear Berg concedes to Heitkamp at 2:45ish CDT. With Angus King, Dems go up 55-45 in Senate. If nothing else, they have a cushion for 2014

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Both members of the only married couple in Congress lost their races last night. Rep. Connie Mack (R-Fla.) was defeated in his U.S. Senate campaign against Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) and Mack's wife, Rep. Mary Bono Mack (R-Calif.) lost her bid for reelection to Democrat Raul Ruiz by 4,500 votes.

Bono Mack was first elected to Congress in a 1998 special election following the death of her first husband, Rep. Sonny Bono (R-Calif.). She was seen as the frontrunner to hold the Palm Springs area seat, having defeated her previous Democratic challengers by large margins. She married Connie Mack, a four-term congressman, in 2007. It is her third marriage and his second.

-- John Celock

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With North Dakota's U.S. Senate race still undecided, Democrat Heidi Heitkamp's narrow lead over Republican Rep. Rick Berg is the best showing by a Democrat statewide in North Dakota this year. Current results show Heitkamp, a former state attorney general, holds a 3,000 vote -- or 1 percentage point -- lead over Berg in the contest to replace retiring Sen. Kent Conrad (D).

The next closest Democratic performances in the state this year occurred in the races for Congress and public service commissioner. In the congressional race, Republican Public Service Commissioner Kevin Cramer defeated Democrat former state Rep. Pam Gulleson 54 percent to 41 percent. In the public service commissioner race, Republican Randy Christmann defeated Democrat Brad Crabtree 54 percent to 41 percent. Crabtree was one of the most outspoken candidates in North Dakota, using the race to campaign for ethics reform and what he believed to be moral lapses at the Public Service Commission. In the governor's race, Gov. Jack Dalrymple (R) easily defeated state Senate Minority Leader Ryan Taylor (D-Towner), 63 percent to 34 percent.

If elected, Heitkamp would be the first woman elected to represent North Dakota in Congress and the second woman to serve the state in Washington, D.C. Former Sen. Jocelyn Burdick (D) represented North Dakota in the Senate for three months in 1992 following the death of her husband, Sen. Quentin Burdick (D). Jocelyn Burdick was appointed to her Senate seat by then Gov. George Sinner (D).

-- John Celock

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@ NBCNews : NBC News declares Steve Bullock as the projected winner in Montana - Governor. #NBCPolitics

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Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.) is expected to lose his reelection bid to Democrat Patrick Murphy, although the race has not yet been fully called. Until it is, West's campaign isn't pleased that people keep saying he's out, according to a statement posted on his Facebook page Wednesday morning:

Our race is far from decided and there is no rush to declare an outcome. Ensuring a fair and accurate counting off all ballots is of the utmost importance. There are still tens of thousands of absentee ballots to be counted in Palm Beach County and potential provisional ballots across the district. Late last night Congressman West maintained a district wide lead of nearly 2000 votes until the St. Lucie County Supervisor of Elections “recounted” thousands of early ballots. Following that "recount" Congressman West trailed by 2,400 votes. In addition, there were numerous other disturbing irregularities reported at polls across St. Lucie County including the doors to polling places being locked when the polls closed in direct violation of Florida law, thereby preventing the public from witnessing the procedures used to tabulate results. The St. Lucie County Supervisor of Elections office clearly ignored proper rules and procedures, and the scene at the Supervisor’s office last night could only be described as complete chaos. Given the hostility and demonstrated incompetence of the St. Lucie County Supervisor of Elections, we believe it is critical that a full hand recount of the ballots take place in St. Lucie County. We will continue to fight to ensure every vote is counted properly and fairly, and accordingly we will pursue all legal means necessary.

Murphy is leading in votes, according to exit polling, with 160,328 to West's 157,872. The district is the only House race in Florida that has yet to be called.

-- Elise Foley

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More than 55 percent of Latino voters thought the Romney campaign was hostile toward them -- a good indication of why he may have lost them so badly -- and 18 percent believed he had no interest in reaching out to them, according to an impreMedia-Latino Decisions poll released in full Wednesday morning.

The "election eve" poll was taken from Nov. 1 to Nov. 5, surveying Latinos who had either already voted or said they were certain they would do so. Results from 11 states were released late Tuesday evening and into early Wednesday.

ImpreMedia-Latino Decisions found that a record proportion of Latinos, 75 percent, supported President Barack Obama, while only 23 percent voted for GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who conceded the election after losing the electoral college by more than 100 votes. National exit polls put Obama at 71 percent support from Latinos and Romney at 27 percent.

Obama likely fared better among Latinos in part because he seemed more interested in reaching out to them: 66 percent of those polled said they felt Obama truly cares about them. Twenty-three percent said Obama was hostile toward Latino voters.

Immigration reform proved pivotal, even though it wasn't the highest-ranking priority, with 57 percent of Latino voters polled saying they were less enthusiastic about Romney based on his positions on the issue.

See the full results here, including state breakdowns in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Massachusetts, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio and Texas.

-- Elise Foley

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@ breakingpol : Montana Sen Jon Tester wins re-election - @AP

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Mitt Romney and California's John Frémont have something in common: both presidential candidates lost their home states by historic margins.

According to Smart Politics, only Frémont -- one of the nation's first Republicans, in 1856 -- suffered a greater defeat from his own constituents in California than Romney did Tuesday in Massachusetts. With more than 95 percent of the vote counted in the state, Romney trailed Obama by a 23.4-point margin, Smart Politics reported.

Read more here.

--Andrea Stone

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The leader of the Republican Party in Manhattan called newly reelected Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) a "lapdog" for Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) in an interview with City & State on Wednesday. The move comes the morning after Gillibrand defeated Republican Wendy Long.

Manhattan Republican Chairman Dan Isaacs told the website of the state political publication that his opinion was formed when the two clerked together for a federal judge.

“It’s an example of why we are where we are as a country that we don’t have people of substance who really can step up. It’s a joke," Isaacs said, according to City & State.

- John Celock

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Minnesota residents voted against an amendment on Nov. 6 that would have defined marriage as being between a man and woman in the state's constitution -- though it isn't likely to end the local debate over which couples should have legal access to marriage rights.

With the rejection, the state became the first in the country to shoot down a constitutional amendment limiting marriage equality, reports the Duluth News Tribune.

Gay marriage remains illegal in the Minnesota. However, without the constitutional amendment, making it legal in the future will be easier for pro-equality advocates.

Read more here.

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Sen.-elect Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) took a victory lap on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" on Wednesday.

"This has just been amazing," she said of her victory. Warren ran against Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) in the state Senate race.

Of her supporters, Warren said, "They saw this race as a race about what kind of people we are and what kind of country we're going to build … I have to say, this is democracy."

Asked about what she would do in Washington, she said, "I come there not just to be a senator."

"This is for all the people who are out there -- we play by the rules, we just want a chance to have a little economic security," she said.

"This isn't about parties, I'll work with anyone," Warren said.

Warren is greeting commuters in South Boston on Wednesday morning.

--Luke Johnson

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"The bond between Europe and North America, based upon the shared values on which our alliance was founded over 60 years ago, remains as strong, and as important to the preservation of Euro-Atlantic peace and security as ever. President Obama has demonstrated outstanding leadership in maintaining this vital bond." --NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen

For more world reaction to the 2012 election, click here.

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@ BreakingNews : Bill Clinton was the first person President Obama called after receiving concession call from Mitt Romney, campaign official says - @NBCNews

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@ breakingpol : Republican Michele Bachmann defeats hotelier Jim Graves to win 4th term in expensive Minnesota House race - @AP

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@ Reuters : FLASH: California Democrats say win supermajority in California State Assembly

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Democrats appear to have retaken control of the Colorado state House of Representatives. Local station 9News reports that Democrats will unseat three Republican legislators to regain control of the chamber they lost in 2010. The Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee has declared victory in the state.

State House Minority Leader Mark Ferrandino (D-Denver) is poised to become the state's first openly gay speaker of the House with the victory. Earlier this year, Ferrandino saw a bill he pushed to allow civil unions in the state blocked by the state House Republican leadership. Ferrandino would be the fourth openly gay individual in American history to preside over a state legislative chamber.

Democrats control the Colorado state Senate and the governor's office.

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The race for the U.S. Senate in North Dakota was deemed too close to call Wednesday morning, but Democrat Heidi Heitkamp declared on Twitter that her 3,000 vote edge would hold.

"I am confident I am going to be the next United States Senator from North Dakota," she tweeted

Heitkamp was leading Rep. Rick Berg (R) 160,752 to 157,758 votes, but the results had not been certified. North Dakota is the only state that does not require voter registration, and anyone who can show they've been living in the state for 30 days is allowed to vote.

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Democrat Brandon Whipple, who was attacked by the Tea Party over the weekend for not having children, has won a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives. Returns published by the secretary of state show Whipple defeating Republican Rick Lindsey 58 percent to 42 percent in the newly created Wichita district.

On Saturday, campaign literature created by Kansans for Liberty, a Tea Party group in Wichita, asked, "Can someone with no children really understand your family's needs?" about the Democrat.

Whipple, 30, noted that he and his wife, Chelsea, have been trying to have children and told HuffPost that the ad, which included other attacks, took the race to "a different level." The literature included other attacks on Whipple, which the Democrat said were false.

Craig Gabel, the head of Kansans for Liberty, told HuffPost that the piece was meant to point out issues about Whipple and ask if he could address children's issues if he wasn't a parent. Whipple's opponent, Lindsey, also didn't have children. Gabel said a similar piece was not created against Lindsey, since Lindsey was in agreement with Tea Party principles.

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Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's (D) landslide victory over Republican Wendy Long also appears to give her claim to the having won the largest percentage of the vote in New York state history. Gillbrand received 72 percent of the vote in unofficial returns, higher than Schumer's 70.6 percent victory in 2004 over Republican Assemblyman Howard Mills.

Gillibrand's victory showed her capturing 60 of the state's 62 counties, losing only Allegany and Wyoming Counties to Long, a judicial activist. Schumer captured 61 counties in his 2004 campaign, landing him in a tie with former Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who won 61 counties in 1988.

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Democratic Rep. Kathy Hochul -- the western New Yorker who galvanized Democrats by winning her 2011 special election on an anti-Paul Ryan platform -- lost her reelection bid to Republican Chris Collins in a heavily gerrymandered district.

Hochul, a former Eric County Clerk, set the tone for Democrats in 2012 by winning her special election, largely on the strength of a save-Medicare message that repudiated Ryan's plans to turn the program into a private, voucher-based system.

She was the first Democrat to win the district in decades, but the new map gave it the largest Republican voter base in the state. Still, Hochul nearly beat Collins, falling less than 6,000 votes short, losing 49.3 to 50.7 percent.

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Republican Mia Love has conceded her house race against Democratic incumbent Rep. Jim Matheson to represent Utah's 2nd congressional district, Fox 13 reports.

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WMC-TV reports:

Reports are coming in that riots are brewing on the Ole Miss campus in Oxford, Mississippi.

[...]

Photos show huge group of people on the campus, some even lighting Obama-Biden signs on fire in response to the presidential election results.

Read the full story here.

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@ RalstonReports : #nvsen is final. Heller wins.

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Republicans know that they lost a major opportunity Tuesday, and Sen. John Cornyn, the Texan who runs the National Republican Senatorial Committee, said it was time for the party to look in the mirror.

"It’s clear that with our losses in the Presidential race, and a number of key Senate races, we have a period of reflection and recalibration ahead for the Republican Party," Cornyn said. "While some will want to blame one wing of the party over the other, the reality is candidates from all corners of our GOP lost tonight. Clearly we have work to do in the weeks and months ahead."

But he also warned Democrats not to get too cocky, and while calling for bipartisanship, got in a dig at President Barack Obama.

"While the Democrats had a good night, they should not over-read their mandate as reflected by the almost evenly divided popular vote," he said. "It’s important to observe that nothing that happened tonight changes the very serious challenges confronting our country –- a $16 trillion debt, year-after-year of massive deficit spending, unsustainable entitlement programs, and a tax code that picks winners and losers while discouraging economic growth and job creation.

“Solving these very serious problems will take real presidential leadership," Cornyn added. "This is something we unfortunately did not see in the president’s first term, but that all of us hope for in his second.”

-- Michael McAuliff

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Final votes from the Kansas City, Mo. area have given state Rep. Jason Kander (D-Kansas City) an apparent victory in the race for Missouri secretary of state. Final returns show Kander leading state Rep. Shane Schoeller (R-Willard) 48.8 percent to 47.5 percent. Kander's lead is just over 33,000 votes, with over 2.5 million cast statewide in the race.

The Kansas City-area votes, the last to be counted in the race, pushed Kander past the seven-point lead that Schoeller had maintained most of the evening. Kander, an Afghanistan War veteran, pushed an ethics reform agenda in the race, calling for caps on campaign contributions in the state. Kander, who has made ethics reform a top issue as a state legislator, also promised to use the office to promote economic development. Kander highlighted his Afghanistan experience in multiple ads in the race.

Schoeller made voter identification a key issue in the race, which saw him receive a last minute infusion of $525,000 from the Republican State Leadership Committee. Schoeller received backing from businessmen Rex Sinquefield and David Humphreys, who provided large campaign contributions, along with free billboards from the state's billboard lobby. A key issue in the race was the writing of the state's ballot initiative language, an issue that Sinquefield has pressed with his interest in pushing statewide referendums on several issues.

Kander and Schoeller were competing to succeed retiring Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D).

-- John Celock

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Republican Mike Coffman has been projected as the winner of his Colorado House race by the AP.

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Democrats Ron Kind and Gwen Moore and Republicans Sean Duffy and Reid Ribble were projected the winners of their respective Wisconsin House races by the AP.

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Republican Steve Scalise and Democrat Cedric Richmond have been projected the winners of their respective Louisiana House races by the AP.

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Republicans John Carter and Randy Weber and Democrat Pete Gallego have been projected the winners of their respective Texas House races by the AP.

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Mitt Romney has been projected the winner of Alaska, according to the AP.

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Republicans Trey Radel, Vern Buchanan and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Democrats Debbie Wasserman-Schultz, Joe Garcia, Ted Deutch and Lois Frankel have been projected the winners of their respective Florida House races by the AP.

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Democrat Nick Rahall is the projected winner of his West Virginia House race by the AP.

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In a major blow to Michigan unions, voters rejected a proposal Tuesday that would have amended the state's constitution to guarantee public and private-sector employees the right to organize and collectively bargain. Proposal 2 failed 58 to 42 percent with 70 percent of precincts reporting, according to the Detroit News and the Detroit Free Press.

The measure was meant to be a preemptive tactic by unions to protect bargaining rights in light of recent legislation in other states limiting such powers.

Read more here.

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Republicans Mike Grimm, Christopher Gibson, Chris Collins, Richard Hanna, Thomas Reed and Peter King and Democrats Steve Israel, Daniel Maffei, Paul Tonko, Brian Higgins, Louise Slaughter, Bill Owens, Nydia Velasquez, Sean Maloney, Nita Lowey, Hakeem Jeffries, Eliot Engel, Joe Crowley, Jose E. Serrano, Charles Rangel, Yvette Clarke, Carolyn Maloney, Jerrold Nadler, Gregory Meeks, Grace Meng, Carolyn McCarthy and Timothy Bishop have been projected the winners of their respective New York House races by the AP.

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Republicans Joe Heck and Mark Amodei and Democrats Dina Titus and Steven Horsford have been projected the winners of their respective Nevada House races by the AP.

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Republican Steve Pearce and Democrats Ben R. Lujan and Michelle Lujan Grisham have been projected the winners of their respective New Mexico House races by the AP.

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Republicans Chris Smith, Scott Garrett, Rodney Frelinghuysen, Leonard Lance and Jon Runyan and Democrats Albio Sires, Rush Holt and Frank Pallone have been projected the winners of their respective New Jersey House races by the AP.

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Kevin Cramer was projected to be the winner of his North Dakota House race by the AP.

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Republicans Jeff Fortenberry and Adrian Smith have been projected the winners of their respective Nebraska House races by the AP.

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Washington looks poised to join Maine and Maryland in allowing same-sex couples to wed via public vote.

Given the state's mail-in voting system, Washington's final tally won't be official for the next few days. But the Seattle Post-Intelligencer found that support for Referendum 74 was leading 51.8 percent to 48.2 percent in the final hours of Nov. 6.

Read more here.

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Republicans Richard Hudson and Robert Pittenger have been projected the winners of their respective North Carolina House races by the AP.

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Republican Kansas state Senate candidate Steve Fitzgerald, who told a Kansas City group last month that Catholics could not be Democrats, appears to have defeated state Sen. Kelly Kultala (D). Returns on the secretary of state's website show Fitzgerald leading Kultala 52 percent to 48 percent.

Fitzgerald had told the Polish American Club that Catholics could not be Democrats, because the party platform did not mesh with Catholic teachings. Fitzgerald later told HuffPost that part of his message was for Catholics to help fix the Democratic Party to make it stronger.

The Kultala-Fitzgerald race was one of several competitive races where Democratic incumbent senators were targeted for defeat by conservatives. Kultala, the unsuccessful Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor in 2010, faced a barrage of mailers tying her to President Barack Obama on such issues as the economy and health care reform.

-- John Celock

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@ edhenryTV : Fox News has learned that immediately after getting the concession call from Romney, President Obama called .... former President BClinton

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@ aterkel : NH is run by ladies now -- all-female congressional delegation, woman in the governor's office.

Carol Shea-Porter has been projected the winner of her House Race in New Hampshire by the AP.

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An Iowa state senator who died last month from breast cancer received the most votes Tuesday to represent Iowa's Senate District 22, The Waukee Patch reports.

Pat Ward, a Republican who was seeking reelection at the time of her death, led Democratic candidate Desmund Adams, according to unofficial results.

The state's Republican Party has until Nov. 13 to submit a candidate to appear on the Dec. 11 special election ballot in the place of Ward.

John Ward, the late state senator's husband, announced last week that he intends to seek the nomination.

Read more here.

-- Ian Gray

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Republicans Blaine Luetkemeyer, Billy Long, Vicky Hartzler and Ann Wagner and Democrats Emanuel Cleaver, Jo Ann Emerson and Lacy Clay have been projected the winners of their respective Missouri House races by the AP.

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Republican John Kline and Democrats Tim Walz and Collin Peterson have been projected the winners of their respective Minnesota House races by the AP.

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  • People cast their ballots at electronic voting booths at a Madison, Miss., precinct, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Local officials expressed their pleasure with the large early turnout of voters. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

  • A voter shows his driver's license at a Madison, Miss., precinct, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Although the state has no Voter ID law, Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant and other Republican officials suggested voters show ID's as a protest to federal rulings against the voter ID legislation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

  • Hundreds of people wait in line to vote at Green Run High School in Virginia Beach, VA., on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Some people had to wait longer than four hours to cast their vote at the school. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Ross Taylor) MAGS OUT

  • Leon Levy

    Poll worker Leon Levy attaches stickers to a tabletop on election day on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Nashville, Tenn. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

  • People cast their votes Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, at polling location inside the Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in Northeast Philadelphia, where a mural of President Barack Obama painted on a wall behind two voting booths was ordered covered up by a Philadelphia court. The mural had been left uncovered when the polling location opened, but was ordered covered after Republicans filed a complaint. (AP Photo/ Joseph Kaczmarek)

  • Election clerk Rita Saia looks over sign in sheets, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, at a 1st Ward polling location in South Philadelphia. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come.(AP Photo/ Joseph Kaczmarek)

  • College student Paige McLoughlin, 19, of Parker, Colo., talks over paperwork with an electoral official before voting in the general election, at a polling station serving the local student population on the campus of the University of Colorado, in Boulder, Colo., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • Politicians out at early voting places

    Election supervisor Eric Salabay, foreground, watches as U.S. Sen Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., applauds as she checks in with election officials before voting at Kirkwood Community Center Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Kirkwood, Mo. McCaskill is running for reelection against Republican challenger Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo. (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, J.B. Forbes) EDWARDSVILLE INTELLIGENCER OUT; THE ALTON TELEGRAPH OUT

  • People wait in a long line at Greenbriar Middle School earl Tuesday afternoon Nov. 6, 2012, In chesapeake, Va. Voters said it took them three hours or longer to cast their ballot. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Brian J. Clark) MAGS OUT

  • Ballots are movedin the King County Elections ballot processing facility in Renton, Wash. as the mail-in ballots continue to come in on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/seattlepi.com, Joshua Trujillo)

  • King County Elections employee Jan Reese looks over a ballot at the King County Elections ballot processing facility in Renton, Wash. as the mail-in ballots continue to come in on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/seattlepi.com, Joshua Trujillo)

  • Mike Weigart

    After voting, Mike Weigart, 30, carries his ballot and his surfboard to the ballot box at the polling place at the Venice Beach lifeguard headquarters in Los Angeles Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Weigart said "It's awesome the polling place is where I surf." (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

  • A voter casts his ballot in the basement of a private residence turned polling stating on Election Day in Chicago, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

  • George Allen, Susan Allen

    Virginia Republican senate candidate George Allen, accompanied by his wife Susan, vote in their home precinct in the Mount Vernon area of Fairfax County, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

  • Richard Carmona

    Former U.S. Surgeon General and Democratic senatorial candidate Richard Carmona greets supporters and volunteers at Arizona Democratic Party headquarters, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Phoenix. Carmona is running against Republican Rep. Jeff Flake for the Senate seat vacated by retiring Republican Jon Kyl.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

  • Sherrod Brown

    Democrat U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown calls volunteers to thank them for their service at a campaign office Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio. Shirley Sherman, right, is a volunteer. Brown is running against Josh Mandel for the Senate. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

  • Deb Fischer

    Nebraska's Republican candidate for US Senate Deb Fischer waves to motorists Tuesday Nov 6, 2012 in Omaha, Neb. Fischer is running against Bob Kerrey for the Senate seat held by Ben Nelson who is retiring.(AP Photo/Dave Weaver)

  • Maize Hirono

    Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Maize Hirono, left, hugs Korean War veteran Tommy Tanaka, 85, at the Like Like Drive Inn restaurant, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Honolulu. Hirono is running for Senate againsta former Hawaii Gov. Linda Lingle. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

  • U.S. Senator Bob Casey, D-Pa. shakes hands with Thomas Ashman, 78, of Scranton, a Korean War Veteran at Chick's Diner in Scranton, Pa. during Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Scranton Times & Tribune, Butch Comegys) WILKES BARRE TIMES-LEADER OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

  • Josh Mandel

    Republican senate candidate Ohio treasurer Josh Mandel, right, arrives to vote in Beachwood, Ohio Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Mandel is challenging incumbent Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

  • United Auto Workers retiree Jackie Smith listens during a rally on Election Day at the UAW Region 1 technical training center in Warren, Mich., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

  • People wait in a long line at Greenbriar Middle School earl Tuesday afternoon Nov. 6, 2012, In chesapeake, Va. Voters said it took them three hours or longer to cast their ballot. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Brian J. Clark) MAGS OUT

  • Sanders 2012

    U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders casts his ballot at the Burlington, Vt., Ward 7 polling place at the Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Sanders, a former Burlington mayor and U.S. House member seeking his second six-year term in the Senate, frequently criticizes an America in which the rich get more while the rest get squeezed. Federal Election Commission reports show Sanders had amassed $6.8 million in campaign funds as of Sept. 30, versus less than $77,000 for Republican challenger John MacGovern. (AP Photo/Andy Duback)

  • Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Puerto Ricans are electing a governor as the U.S. island territory does not get a vote in the U.S. presidential election. But they are also casting ballots in a referendum that asks voters if they want to change the relationship to the United States. A second question gives voters three alternatives: become the 51st U.S. state, independence, or sovereign free association, a designation that would give more autonomy. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

  • President Barack Obama buttons at the Obama field office located on Wyoming Avenue in Scranton, Pa., on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 during Election Day. (AP Photo/Scranton Times & Tribune, Butch Comegys) WILKES BARRE TIMES-LEADER OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama is embraced by a volunteer as he visits a campaign office the morning of the 2012 election, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Mitt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney waves to a crowd gathered at a nearby parking lot after his campaign plane arrived at Moon Township Pittsburgh International Airport in Coraopolis, Pa., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • U.S. Citizens Head To The Polls To Vote In Presidential Election

    PHILADELPHIA, PA - NOVEMEBER 6: Poll workers guide a woman into a voting booth at a polling place located inside a decorator's garage on November 6, 2012 in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. U.S. citizens go to the polls today to vote in the election between Democratic President Barack Obama and Republican nominee former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

  • US-VOTE-2012-ELECTION

    Three Obama supporters walk around the south side of Chicago, Illinois on November 6, 2012 wearing Obama and a Mitt Romney mask holding placards asking people to vote. Citizens around the United States head to the polls to vote on the country's next president including in Ohio, a state with 18 electoral votes, were the race between US President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney is very close. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • U.S. Citizens Head To The Polls To Vote In Presidential Election

    TOLEDO, OH - NOVEMBER 6: James Bolden (L) and Fredric Woodsom, both employees of the Friendly Center, watch voters November 6, 2012 in Toledo, Ohio. Voting is underway in the battleground state of Ohio in the U.S. presidential election between Democratic President Barack Obama and Republican nominee former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (Photo by J.D. Pooley/Getty Images)

  • Romney Makes Two Final Campaigns Stops In Ohio And Pennsylvania On Election Day

    RICHMOND HEIGHTS, OH - NOVEMBER 06: Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney jokes with staff members at a Wendy's restaurant on November 6, 2012 in Richmond Heights, Ohio. The presidential race remains tight as Americans are heading to the polls to cast their ballots. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

  • U.S. Citizens Head To The Polls To Vote In Presidential Election

    PHILADELPHIA, PA - NOVEMEBER 6: A chalk drawing supports President Barack Obama on election day on November 6, 2012 in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Recent polls show that U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney are in a tight race. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

  • U.S. Citizens Head To The Polls To Vote In Presidential Election

    STERLING HEIGHTS, MI, - NOVEMBER 6: U.S. citizens vote in the presidential election at Carleton Middle School November 6, 2012 in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Recent polls show that U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney are in a tight race. (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

  • William Wright, left, and India Johnson, both freshmen at Old Dominion University, wait on line to vote at Larchmont Elementary School in Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Wright and Johnson, both 18 and from Richmond, were excited to cast their first votes in the Presidential election. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Amanda Lucier)

  • VIRGINIA VOTE

    Voters wait on line on Election Day at the Amtrak waiting room at Main St. Station in Richmond, Va Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Bob Brown).

  • Election Day Roanoke

    Officer of Election Gloria Dowe checks an identification at the Highland precinct 1 at the Roanoke Scottish Rite Building in Roanoke, Va. on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/The Roanoke Times, Kyle Green)

  • Addey Munye

    Addey Munye, 67, shows off her "I Voted" sticker after she cast her ballot in her first election at a polling station in the West Acres Mall in Fargo, N.D, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Munye is originally from Somalia. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

  • University of Texas at Austin freshmen Aura Maria Salazar and Nicolas Montoya study inside the Flawn Academic Center, the designated polling location on campus, while the line to vote wraps around the building on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa)

  • Election Day Roanoke

    After casting his vote, 86-year-old World War II Navy Veteran Robert Carper waits for his wife at the Cave Spring precinct at the Church of the Holy Spirit, in Roanoke County, Va. Robert said the first time he voted was in the Franklin D. Roosevelt vs Thomas E. Dewey contest in 1944. (AP Photo/The Roanoke Times, Kyle Green)

  • Mary Lee votes at the Neptune Society Columbarium Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in San Francisco. Built in 1898, the Neo-Classical columbarium is one of the last remaining cemeteries in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

  • Voters wait in line at a polling place located inside a shopping mall on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • MItt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney walks toward members of the press after arriving at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Cleveland, Ohio. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • Voters cast their ballots at a polling station inside the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 .After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

  • Dora A Winter of Nampa, looks up after an "I Voted" sticker was placed on her forehead at Karcher Church of the Nazarene on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Nampa, Idaho. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Idaho Press-Tribune, Adam Eschbach) MANDATORY CREDIT: ADAM ESCHBACH/IDAHO PRESS-TRIBUNE

  • Voters wait in line to cast their ballots under a tent at a consolidated polling station for residents of the Rockaways on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York. Voting in a the U.S. presidential election was the latest challenge for the hundreds of thousands of people in the New York-New Jersey area still affected by Superstorm Sandy, as they struggled to get to non-damaged polling places to cast their ballots in one of the tightest elections in recent history. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • Democrat candidate for U.S. Senate Elizabeth Warren, center right, greets supporters outside the polls after voting in Cambridge, Mass. on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Warren is running against Sen. Scott Brown (R-MA), who was elected in a special election in 2010 after the death of Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA). (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

  • Rick Berg

    Republican U.S. Senate candidate Rick Berg smiles as he heads over to cast his completed ballot while voting at the Fargo Dome in Fargo, N.D, Monday, Nov. 5, 2012. Berg is running against Democrat Heidi Heitkamp for North Dakota's U.S Senate seat. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

  • A man tries to hand his ballot, top right, to an election worker, standing in the doorway, as voters crowd an apartment building hallway, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in the Coney Island section of New York. Voting in the U.S. presidential election was the latest challenge for the hundreds of thousands of people in the New York-New Jersey area still affected by Superstorm Sandy, as they struggled to get to non-damaged polling places to cast their ballots in one of the tightest elections in recent history. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Voters wait in line tocast their ballots at a polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Miami. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/The Miami Herald, Tim Chapman) MAGS OUT

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama speaks to media as he visits a campaign office the morning of the 2012 election, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama waves to people as he leaves a campaign office the morning of the 2012 election, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)