House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi had a sharp exchange with NBC reporter Luke Russert on Wednesday.

Pelosi was announcing her intent to remain in post as the leader of the minority caucus in the House. Russert asked whether this choice was blocking younger members who wanted to move up in the party.

"Some of your colleagues privately say that your decision to stay on prohibits the party from having a younger leadership and hurts the party in the long term," he said. "What's your response?"

"Age discrimination!" some of Pelosi's colleagues shouted. "Boo!"

"Next!" Pelosi cried, adding, "Oh, you've always asked that question, except to Mitch McConnell!" The women behind her applauded.

Russert pressed on. "No, excuse me," he said. "You, Mr. Hoyer, Mr. Clyburn, you're all over 70. Is your decision to stay on prohibiting younger members from moving forward?"

"Let's for a moment honor it as a legitimate question, although it's quite offensive," Pelosi responded. "You don't realize that, I guess." She went on to say that she had no concerns about the question Russert raised, adding flatly, "the answer is no."

Later, Russert defended himself:


Luke Russert
While Pelosi laughed off my Q as age-ist, many House Ds will privately gripe it hurts caucus that all 3 leaders are 70+.

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