Joe Scarborough and Nate Silver finally faced each other on Tuesday's "Morning Joe," two weeks after Scarborough lost their election bet.

Silver drew a fair amount of scorn from Scarborough and other pundits who doubted his polling predictions for the election. The New York Times blogger was so confident in his forecast, however, that he bet Scarborough $2000 to be donated to the Red Cross. Silver, of course, came out on top.

There were no fireworks between the two when Silver finally appeared on "Morning Joe" on Tuesday. Scarborough briefly addressed his lost bet, saying that a donation was made to Hurricane Sandy relief in Silver's name, before getting into the nitty gritty of Silver's work.

"Let's talk about the best polls, first of all, and secondly, talk about why some of these automated polls... actually turned in great results," Scarborough said.

Silver explained why some pollsters got it wrong. Later, he weighed in on criticism of "horse race coverage" in politics.

When asked to respond to those who say that the focus should be on "underlying issues" instead, Silver said, "I'm more interested in diagnosing 2016 than Benghazi. That's where my bread is buttered... But if you're going to do a horse race, then do it the right way."

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  • A burnt out vehicle sits smoldering in flames after it was set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A broken window after an attack on the U.S. Consulate by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • The U.S. Consulate after an attack by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A burnt car is seen after an attack on the U.S. Consulate by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Soot and debris spills out of the U.S. Consulate after an attack by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. The graffiti reads, "no God but God," " God is great," and "Muhammad is the Prophet." (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A man walks on the grounds of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Glass, debris and overturned furniture are strewn inside a room in the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A man walks through a room in the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Libyans walk on the grounds of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A vehicle and the surrounding area are engulfed in flames after it was set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • An armed man waves his rifle as buildings and cars are engulfed in flames after being set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A vehicle burns after it was set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A vehicle sits smoldering in flames after being set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A vehicle and surrounding buildings smolder after they were set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • LIBYA CONSULATE

    Map locates Benghazi, Libya, where the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed in an attack