LONDON — Classified documents being made public Friday detail how now-disgraced BBC entertainer Jimmy Savile was comfortable at the heart of the British government during his heyday in the 1980s, lunching with Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher at her country home, sending her jokey thank-you notes and lobbying for tax breaks and contributions for his charitable works.

The papers include an unnerving handwritten note from Savile to Thatcher in which he claims that his "girl patients" are pretending to be jealous because of the time he spent dining with the prime minister.

Only with hindsight does the note seem in dubious taste. In recent months Savile – who died last year at age 84 – has been accused of being a serial abuser of hundreds of underage girls. Investigators have called him one of the worst sex offenders in British history and said he used his TV stardom and charity commitments to help him gain access to vulnerable teens.

The platinum-haired, garishly-dressed Savile received a knighthood from Thatcher's government and other honors. He was rumored to be involved with child sex abuse, but was never charged with any crimes.

The National Archives file detailing some of Savile's dealings with the Thatcher government show not only his extraordinary access to the highest levels of government but also that Cabinet ministers took his role as a charity advocate seriously and discussed how best to deal with his requests. The file includes an April 14, 1980 letter from Thatcher to Savile that begins with the greeting, "Dear Jimmy." In it she discusses plans to change tax rules in a way that will give "considerable encouragement" to charities.

The Savile letter to Thatcher is fawning: "I waited a week before writing to thank you for my lunch invitation because I had such a superb time I didn't want to be too effusive," he begins.

Mark Dunton, contemporary history specialist at the National Archives, said the file shows Savile enjoyed an open line of communication, and seemingly friendly relations, with Thatcher and other top officials who seem "obviously oblivious" to any issues surrounding Savile's personal behavior.

"It's common knowledge that Jimmy Savile with his fundraising had this sort of status as a hero, albeit an eccentric hero, for quite a long time," Dunton said.

Savile's goals were serious. He was trying to persuade the prime minister to lessen the amount of time required before a charity could receive tax exempt status, and also lobbying Thatcher to make a governmental contribution to one of his favorite projects – the rebuilding of a spinal injuries unit at the Stoke Mandeville Hospital.

A 1981 Department of Health and Social Security memo suggests that a governmental contribution to the enterprise might be a good idea because the Savile money-raising appeal "has attracted the enthusiasm of people from all walks of life."

In notes to Thatcher, her staff asks the prime minister to clarify any personal commitments she might have made to Savile when he visited her country residence.

The staff also asks if Thatcher had agreed to appear on Savile's show, "Jim'll Fix It." She answers with a handwritten "No."

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • George Entwistle resignation

    BBC director general George Entwistle stands outside BBC Broadcasting House, London, after he announced his resignation over the "unacceptable" Newsnight broadcast which wrongly implicated a senior former Conservative in a child abuse scandal.

  • BBC crisis

    File photo dated 05/10/2010 of Culture Secretary Maria Miller, who today said the £450,000 severance pay for outgoing BBC director-general George Entwistle is "tough to justify considering the circumstances of Mr Entwistle's departure and his contractual arrangements".

  • BBC crisis

    Acting director general of the BBC Tim Davie arrives at New Broadcasting house in central London.

  • BBC crisis

    Acting director general of the BBC Tim Davie arrives at New Broadcasting house in central London.

  • BRITAIN-MEDIA-BBC-CHILD-SEX-POLITICS

    BBC employees arrive for work at the organisation's New Broadcasting House in central London, on November 12, 2012. The BBC's director of news, Helen Boaden, and her deputy, Stephen Mitchell, have stepped aside amid the crisis over late television star Jimmy Savile and a report wrongly accusing a politician of child abuse, the BBC said Monday. The announcement follows the resignation on Saturday of BBC director-general George Entwistle over another Newsnight report last week that wrongly implicated a senior political figure in abuse at a Welsh children's home in the 1970s. AFP PHOTO / WILL OLIVER (Photo credit should read WILL OLIVER/AFP/Getty Images)

  • BRITAIN-MEDIA-BBC-CHILD-SEX-POLITICS

    The BBC's offices at New Broadcasting House are pictured in central London, on November 12, 2012. The BBC's director of news, Helen Boaden, and her deputy, Stephen Mitchell, have stepped aside amid the crisis over late television star Jimmy Savile and a report wrongly accusing a politician of child abuse, the BBC said Monday. The announcement follows the resignation on Saturday of BBC director-general George Entwistle over another Newsnight report last week that wrongly implicated a senior political figure in abuse at a Welsh children's home in the 1970s. AFP PHOTO / WILL OLIVER (Photo credit should read WILL OLIVER/AFP/Getty Images)

  • BRITAIN-MEDIA-BBC-CHILD-SEX-POLITICS

    CROPPED VERSION The shadow of chairman of the BBC Trust Lord Chris Patten is reflected on a wall outside the BBC's offices in central London on November 11, 2012. Patten called for a radical overhaul of the world's largest broadcaster after it was plunged into crisis following the resignation of the director-general amid a sex abuse scandal. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • George Entwistle resignation

    BBC director general George Entwistle (left) looks on as Chairman of the BBC Trust Lord Patten speaks to the media outside BBC Broadcasting House, London, after Mr Entwistle announced his resignation over the "unacceptable" Newsnight broadcast which wrongly implicated a senior former Conservative in a child abuse scandal.

  • George Entwistle resignation

    BBC director general George Entwistle (left) looks on as Chairman of the BBC Trust Lord Patten speaks to the media outside BBC Broadcasting House, London, after Mr Entwistle announced his resignation over the "unacceptable" Newsnight broadcast which wrongly implicated a senior former Conservative in a child abuse scandal.

  • George Entwistle resignation

    BBC director general George Entwistle speaks to the media outside BBC Broadcasting House, London, as he announced his resignation over the "unacceptable" Newsnight broadcast which wrongly implicated a senior former Conservative in a child abuse scandal.

  • Savile sex abuse investigation

    File photo dated 23/10/2012 of BBC Television Centre, Wood Lane, London, as the BBC revealed it is investigating nine allegations of "sexual harassment, assault or inappropriate conduct" among current staff and contributors as the fallout from the Jimmy Savile scandal continues.

  • Savile sex abuse investigation

    File photo dated 03/02/1999 of Sir Jimmy Savile, as the BBC revealed it is investigating nine allegations of "sexual harassment, assault or inappropriate conduct" among current staff and contributors as the fallout from the Jimmy Savile scandal continues.

  • Savile sex abuse investigation

    File photo dated 25/01/12 of Chairman of the BBC Trust, Lord Patten, who has said he is dedicated to getting to the bottom of the Jimmy Savile scandal that has engulfed the corporation, vowing there would be "no covering our backs".

  • Savile sex abuse investigation

    File photo dated 01/01/72 of DJ Jimmy Savile visiting the patients and staff of Leeds General Infirmary at the start of the new year. tHE Chairman of the BBC Trust, Lord Patten, has said he is dedicated to getting to the bottom of the Jimmy Savile scandal that has engulfed the corporation, vowing there would be "no covering our backs".

  • Savile sex abuse investigation

    File photo dated 27/10/2005 of Dame Janet Smith. An inquiry into the BBC's "culture and practices" during the era of star presenter Jimmy Savile's campaign of sexual abuse is to begin today.

  • Winterbourne View court case

    Bev Dawkins (third right) of Mencap reads a statement on behalf of the families who suffered abuse by 11 members of staff from the Winterbourne View care home who were caught on camera abusing severely disabled patients during an undercover BBC Panorama investigation at the South Gloucestershire private hospital.

  • Gary Glitter Arrested By Officers From 'Operation Yewtree'

    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 28: Police officers leave the apartment of Paul Gadd, otherwise known as 'Gary Glitter' on October 28, 2012 in London, England. Police have arrested the former pop star and convicted sex offender as part of their investigation into allegations of sexual abuse by Jimmy Savile. (Photo by Warrick Page/Getty Images)

  • Culture, Media and Sport select committee

    BBC Director-General George Entwistle leaves Portcullis House in Westminster, London, after being quizzed about the corporation's handling of the Jimmy Savile sex abuse scandal by a committee of MPs.

  • Culture, Media and Sport select committee

    BBC Director-General George Entwistle (front left) and Head of BBC Editorial Policy David Jordan (front right) give evidence to the Culture, Media and Sport select committee in the House of Commons, London, on the corporation's handling of the Jimmy Savile sex abuse scandal.

  • Culture, Media and Sport select committee

    Head of BBC Editorial Policy David Jordan gives evidence to the Culture, Media and Sport select committee in the House of Commons, London, on the corporation's handling of the Jimmy Savile sex abuse scandal.

  • Culture, Media and Sport select committee

    BBC Director-General George Entwistle gives evidence to the Culture, Media and Sport select committee in the House of Commons, London, on the corporation's handling of the Jimmy Savile sex abuse scandal.