WOMEN
12/28/2012 10:05 am ET

What Django Unchained And Lincoln Have In Common: A Woman Problem

The release of Quentin Tarantino's spaghetti Western slavery revenge drama Django Unchained on the heels of Steven Spielberg's rather more sober biopic Lincoln has given moviegoers a holiday season full of questions about one of the darkest periods in American history. Are we capable of reckoning with the racism of one of our most beloved presidents? Was vengefulness or reconciliation the more useful emotion in governing the reintegration of the seceded states—and individual slaveholders—into the Union? Did slaveholders really pit slaves against each other in fights to the death?

But one question raised unintentionally by both movies is why they ignore so much of the work that black women did to fight for their own freedom. In Lincoln, which portrays the machinations of an all-male legislature and Cabinet, with interjections by the president's wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, that makes at least some historical sense. But both Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), the enslaved wife of Django (Jamie Foxx) in Tarantino's movie, and Elizabeth Keckley (Gloria Reuben), the free black woman who is presented in Lincoln as Mary Todd Lincoln's maid, are curiously blank, important only in how they motivate the black and white men around them.

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