BUSTO ARSIZIO, Italy — AC Milan players walked off the field because of racist chants, abandoning an exhibition match in the first half with lower division club Pro Patria on Thursday.

The game was interrupted and later ended because of chants directed at several black Milan players, despite appeals to stop from the public address announcer.

After repeated chants directed his way, Ghana midfielder Kevin-Prince Boateng picked up the ball and kicked it at a section of the crowd in the 26th minute of the first half.

Boateng took off his shirt and walked off the field with his Milan teammates. Urby Emanuelson, Sulley Muntari and M'Baye Niang also were targeted by the chants.

"Walking off was the right choice when faced with something like this," Milan coach Massimiliano Allegri said. "We need to stop these uncivil gestures. Italy needs to improve and become better educated and more intelligent."

The Italian soccer federation (FIGC) announced an inquiry, but said "no sanction or penalty can erase the disdain for an unjustifiable and intolerable episode."

"We need to react with strength and without silence to isolate the few delinquents that transformed a friendly match into a mess that offends all of Italian football," FIGC said in a statement.

The match, which was scoreless at the time, was not resumed. The game was played in Busto Arsizio, a town located north of Milan. Pro Patria plays in Italy's fourth-tier division.

"Shame that these things still happen... (hashtag )StopRacismforever," Boateng said on Twitter.

Pro Patria defender Devis Nossa said about a dozen fans were involved in the chanting.

"When we tried to reason with them and went under the stands, they didn't even consider it," he said. "They certainly weren't our usual fans."

Milan said on its website that the insults came from a small group of Pro Patria fans, adding other supporters disassociated themselves from the chants.

Italian players' association president Damiano Tommasi applauded Milan's decision to walk off.

"It was a nice signal, even if a sporting event should never be placed in doubt by acts like these," Tommasi said.

In England, there have been several arrests among fans for at Premier League matches, and Liverpool striker Luis Suarez and Chelsea captain John Terry served bans for racially abusing opponents.

In October, Serbian fans directed monkey chants at black England players in a European under-21 match that ended in a brawl between players and coaches from both teams.

Last month, fans of Russian champion Zenit St. Petersburg issued a petition calling for non-white and gay players to be excluded from the team.

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Cleveland Browns vs. Jacksonville Jaguars

    In this Dec. 16, 2001, file photo, officials cover their heads as they leave the field amid debris thrown by fans after an NFL football game between the Cleveland Browns and the Jacksonville Jaguars was stopped with 48 seconds left on the clock in Cleveland. The game was stopped for about a half-hour because of the violence.

  • Olympic Stadium

    Riot police move on to confront fans who have just thrown a smoke bomb during a Greek Super League soccer game at the Olympic stadium in Athens on Sunday March 18, 2012. The Greek league game between leader Olympiakos and Panathinaikos has been abandoned with eight minutes to go because of escalating clashes between fans and the police.

  • Europa League Soccer

    Soccer supporters on the pitch as Greek riot police fire tear gas at PAOK and Rapid Vienna fans clashing in the stands shortly before the teams' Europa League match, in Thessaloniki, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. Police say the violence started when Rapid Vienna fans fired flares at PAOK supporters, who responded in kind. About 700 Rapid Vienna supporters travelled to Thessaloniki for the match.

  • Al-Ahly Soccer

    Team players of the Egyptian Al-Ahly club run for safety during clashes following their soccer match against Al-Masry club at the soccer stadium in Port Said, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. Dozens of Egyptians were killed Wednesday in violence following a soccer match in Port Said, when fans flooded the field seconds after a match against a rival team was over, Egypt's Health ministry said.

  • San Francisco 49ers vs. Oakland Raiders

    In this Aug. 20, 2011 photo, football fans fight in the stands during a preseason NFL football game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Oakland Raiders in San Francisco. After two men were shot and wounded following the preseason game, the NFL and the mayors of the two cities jointly called for an end to "intimidation" and acts of violence at sporting events.

  • 2011 Stanley Cup Finals

    People take pictures of a burning vehicle on June 15, 2011 in Vancouver, Canada. Vancouver broke out in riots after their hockey team the Vancouver Canucks lost in Game Seven of the Stanley Cup Finals.

  • Europa League Soccer

    Greek riot police fire tear gas at PAOK and Rapid Vienna fans clashing in the stands shortly before the teams' Europa League match, in Thessaloniki, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. No arrests or injuries were reported, and Thursday's game for the first leg of the playoff round started with just a delay of a few minutes. Police say the violence started when Rapid Vienna fans fired flares at PAOK supporters, who responded in kind. About 700 Rapid Vienna supporters travelled to Thessaloniki for the match.

  • Al-Ahly Soccer

    Egyptian fans rush into the field following Al-Ahly club soccer match against Al-Masry club at the soccer stadium in Port Said, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012.

  • Malice In The Palace

    In this Nov. 19, 2004, file photo, Indiana Pacers' Ron Artest, now know as Metta World Peace is restrained by teammate Austin Croshere and Pacers' assistant coach Mike Brown before being escorted off the court following their fight with the Detroit Pistons and fans in Auburn Hills, Mich. NBA commissioner David Stern suspended Artest for the remainder of this season, and disciplined eight other members of the Pacers and Pistons, sending a strong message that the league won't tolerate the type of unprecedented violence displayed that night. The brawl was speculated to stand among the worst in league history.

  • Fenerbahce Soccer

    Riot police try to control Fenerbahce fans after their critical soccer match against Galatasaray in Istanbul, Turkey, Saturday, May 12, 2012. One fan was reportedly stabbed after Galatasaray's Turkish league championship triggered violence at the goalless derby match with Fenerbahce and across the country on Saturday. After the final whistle, hundreds of Fenerbahce fans occupied the pitch at their Sukru Saracoglu Stadium in Istanbul. Others broke off plastic chairs and threw them at police, who tried to use their shields to protect the players. In response, police used pepper spray to disperse angry Fenerbahce fans and evacuated the stadium as the players escaped to changing rooms along with police.

  • Panathinaikos Soccer

    Riot police officers are attacked with fire bombs,thrown by Panathinaikos' fans during a soccer game for the Greek Super League at the Olympic stadium in Athens, Sunday, March 18 2012. The Greek league game between leader Olympiakos and Panathinaikos has been abandoned with eight minutes to go because of escalating clashes between fans and the police.

  • Paulista Championship

    Riot policemen stand next to football fans during the Paulista championship football match Santos vs Sao Paulo, at Morumbi stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil on March 18, 2012.

  • Al Masry Soccer

    Egyptians crowd a train station waiting for their friends and relatives' arrival from Port Said in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012. Witnesses say scores of Egyptian soccer fans were stabbed to death while others suffocated, trapped in a long narrow corridor trying to flee rival fans armed with knives, clubs and stones in the country's worst ever soccer violence. At least 74 people died and hundreds were injured when disgruntled fans of the home team, Al Masry, rushed the pitch, setting off clashes and a stampede as riot police largely failed to intervene.

  • 2011 Stanley Cup Finals

    This June 15, 2011 file photo shows Vancouver Canucks hockey fans rioting in downtown Vancouver, Canada following the Vancouver Canucks 4-0 loss to the Boston Bruins in game 7 of the Stanley Cup hockey final.

  • Fenerbahce Soccer

    Riot police seen trying to control Fenerbahce fans after ther critical soccer match against Galatasaray in Istanbul, Turkey, Saturday, May 12, 2012.

  • African Champions League

    Football fans take to the field after an African Champions League match between Zamalek and Tunisian visitor Club Africain in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, April 2, 2011. Police say an unknown number of fans have been wounded while rushing a field in Cairo to attack a referee during an African Champions League match. Zamalek and Tunisian visitor Club Africain were at 1-1 when the referee waved off a Zamalek goal for offside three minutes into injury time.

  • Futsal World Cup 2012

    Thai riot policemen arrest an Iranian football fan after a fight broke out during the Iran and Panama first round football match of the FIFA Futsal World Cup 2012 in Bangkok on November 8, 2012.

  • Euro 2012 Soccer

    Polish riot polic push a Polish football fan after tension posed the city's 'greatest ever' security challenge on June 12, 2012 in Warsaw, ahead of the Euro 2012 championships football match Poland vs Russia. Police used water cannon and tear gas on unruly Euro 2012 fans in Warsaw today as Poland geared up to play old foe Russia in a must-win Euro 2012 match.

  • Fenerbahce Soccer

    A Fenerbahce's fan argues with a Turkish riot policeman during clashes after the victory of Galatasaray at the end of their Turkish Super League playoff final football match at Sukru Saracoglu Stadium in Istanbul, on May 12, 2012.

  • 2011 Stanley Cup Finals

    Police on horseback move down a street during a riot following the Vancouver Canucks being defeated by the Boston Bruins in the NHL Stanley Cup Final in Vancouver, British Columbia, Wednesday, June 15, 2011. Angry, drunken revelers ran wild Wednesday night after the Vancouver Canucks' 4-0 loss to Boston in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals, setting cars and garbage cans ablaze, smashing windows, showering giant TV screens with beer bottles and dancing atop overturned vehicles.