HEALTH NEWS

BPA Research In Mice Fails To Replicate Health Risks

01/04/2013 01:41 pm ET | Updated Mar 06, 2013

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By Brett Spiegel

From antibacterial soap breeding stronger bacteria to the latest fad diet causing more harm than good, there are plenty of examples of scientific claims that turn out, with further research, to be less true than we thought they were.

But there are always different ways to look at things. Researchers at the University of Missouri (MU) in Columbia have done just that with bisphenol A (BPA), the plastics chemical widely thought to be a potential health threat, especially to fetuses and infants.

A 2004 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study that found BPA present in the urine from 93 percent of test subjects prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to eventually ban the chemical from baby bottles, in 2012.

From antibacterial soap breeding stronger bacteria to the latest fad diet causing more harm than good, there are plenty of examples of scientific claims that turn out, with further research, to be less true than we thought they were.

But there are always different ways to look at things. Researchers at the University of Missouri (MU) in Columbia have done just that with bisphenol A (BPA), the plastics chemical widely thought to be a potential health threat, especially to fetuses and infants.

A 2004 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study that found BPA present in the urine from 93 percent of test subjects prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to eventually ban the chemical from baby bottles, in 2012.

"BPA: Dangerous or Just Misunderstood?" originally appeared on Everyday Health.

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