Gov. John Hickenlooper is once again cracking jokes about marijuana policy in Colorado, this time during his State of the State address on Thursday.

Here's how the governor's bit played out:

After 11 failed attempts over 40 years – and with the help of former Govs. Bill Owens and Bill Ritter, the General Assembly and in partnership with state employees – Colorado voters passed Amendment S … finally bringing the state’s outdated personnel system into the 21st century.

Some other amendments passed in November …. one on federal campaign finance reform ……. and another, for the life of me I can’t remember the third one.

Oh yeah, Amendment 64.

The governor may have simply been ironic, joking that he's forgotten about an amendment that has received world-wide attention. Or perhaps the governor was taking a light-weight swipe at cannabis users' supposed forgetfulness. Either way it's Hickenlooper making light of an issue that Colorado voters turned out in large numbers to support -- so large were the numbers that more Coloradans voted for legalizing recreational marijuana than they did for President Barack Obama's reelection.

Hickenlooper, a vocal opponent of Amendment 64, came out against the measure before the November election saying, "Colorado is known for many great things –- marijuana should not be one of them." Then after A64 overwhelmingly passed 55-45, Hickenlooper reacted with a joke about Cheetos and Goldfish, an apparent jab at marijuana users' supposed craving for "munchies:"

The voters have spoken and we have to respect their will. This will be a complicated process, but we intend to follow through. That said, federal law still says marijuana is an illegal drug so don’t break out the Cheetos or Goldfish too quickly.

LEAP's Tom Angell, for one, didn't appreciate the apparent joke the governor was making about marijuana users. "What an insult to the majority of voters who did not follow your recommendation, governor," responded Angell to The Huffington Post last November. "I wouldn't be surprised to see that comment bite him in the ass."

Hickenlooper wasn't all jokes during the State of the State address, he also briefly addressed some of the policy that his marijuana task force is working on.

"We now have a task force hard at work considering the legal and policy implications of Amendment 64," Hickenlooper said. "And we are determined to implement this new law in a way the promotes the health and safety of all Coloradans. We need to expand our DUI law to keep our highways safe from those driving while impaired, and we must put in place consumer and regulatory safeguards and provide law enforcement with effective tools to keep marijuana out of the reach of kids."

The marijuana task force has until the end of February to make policy recommendations to the governor about the implementation of Amendment 64 in Colorado.

Loading Slideshow...
  • $13.7 Billion Saved On Prohibition Enforcement Costs

    The government would save an estimated $13.7 billion on prohibition enforcement costs and tax revenue by legalizing marijuana, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/17/economists-marijuana-legalization_n_1431840.html" target="_hplink">according to a paper endorsed by 300 economists</a>.

  • Marijuana Inmates Cost Prisons $1 Billion A Year

    Inmates incarcerated on marijuana-related charges cost U.S. prisons $1 billion annually, according to a 2007 study, <a href="http://www.alternet.org/rights/47815/" target="_hplink">AlterNet reports</a>.

  • Marijuana Prohibition Costs Taxpayers $41.8 Billion A Year

    Including lost tax revenues, a 2007 study found that enforcing the marijuana prohibition costs tax payers $41.8 billion annually, <a href="http://www.forbes.com/2007/09/29/marijuana-laws-work-biz-cx_qh_1001pot.html" target="_hplink">Forbes</a> reports.

  • California Marijuana Crop Worth $14 Billion A Year

    Marijuana growers account for <a href="http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1884956,00.html" target="_hplink">$14 billion a year in sales in California</a>, making it the state's most valuable cash crop, TIME reports.

  • Illegal Marijuana A $36 Billion A Year Industry

    It's estimated that <a href="http://madamenoire.com/106691/capitalizing-on-the-billion-dollar-marijuana-industry/" target="_hplink">illegal marijuana is a $36 billion industry</a> in the U.S., MadameNoire reports.

  • One-Third Of Americans Think Legalization Would Boost The Economy

    About one-third of Americans say they think <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/20/legalizing-pot-will-not-b_n_544526.html?" target="_hplink">legalizing marijuana would boost the economy</a>, according to a 2010 poll by Associated Press-CNBC.

  • Dispensary Ads Boost Newspapers' Revenue

    The <em>Sacramento News and Review</em> saw a big boost in ad revenue when it offered advertising space for more than 60 medical marijuana dispensaries, enabling the publication to hire three additional employees, <a href="http://www.news10.net/news/local/article/144285/2/Marijuana-ads-mean-big-money-for-weekly-newspaper" target="_hplink">according to News 10</a>.

  • Mendocino Zip Tie Program Raised $600,000

    Mendocino County, California's zip tie program aimed at regulating medical marijuana growing by charging permits for each plant raised <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/09/medical-marijuana-license-mendocino_n_1193198.html" target="_hplink">$600,000 in revenue in for the Sheriff's department</a> in 2011.

  • Oakland Raised More Than $1 Million In Marijuana Tax Revenue

    The city of Oakland, California raised $1.3 million in tax revenue from medical marijuana dispensaries in 2011, 3 percent of the city's total business tax revenue, according to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/us/cities-turn-to-a-crop-for-cash-medical-marijuana.html?_r=1" target="_hplink"><em>The New York Times</em></a>.

  • Colorado Pulls In $5 Million From Pot Sales Tax

    In 2011, Colorado pulled in $5 milllion in sales taxes from medical marijuana businesses, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/us/cities-turn-to-a-crop-for-cash-medical-marijuana.html?_r=1" target="_hplink"><em>The New York Times</em></a> reports.

  • Legal Marijuana Could Be $100 Billion Industry

    Economist Stephen Easton estimated in 2010 that <a href="http://www.businessweek.com/debateroom/archives/2010/03/legalize_mariju.html" target="_hplink">legal marijuana could be a $45 to $100 billion industry</a>, <em>Bloomberg Businessweek</em> reports.

  • Each weGrow Center Creates 75 Jobs

    When hydroponic marijuana growing supply chain weGrow opens a new store it <a href="http://aznow.biz/small-biz/wegrow-phoenix-opens-cultivates-opportunities-arizona)" target="_hplink">creates an estimated 75 jobs</a> indirectly, according to AZBusiness Magazine.

  • Majority Of States Support Taxing Marijuana

    More than <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/20/legalizing-pot-will-not-b_n_544526.html?" target="_hplink">60 percent of states agree with taxing marijuana</a>, according to a poll by Associated Press-CNBC.

  • Marijuana Affects Workplace Motivation

    A Norwegian study 25 years in the making came to the shocking conclusion that <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/24/marijuana-use-has-adverse-affect-workplace-motivation_n_1300278.html?" target="_hplink">frequent marijuana use lowers employees' motivation at work</a>.

  • More Than 1,000 Dispensaries In California

    There could be more than 1,000 medical marijuana dispensaries operating in California, <a href="http://www.pasadenaweekly.com/cms/story/detail/how_does_your_pot_grow/8070/" target="_hplink"><em>Pasadena Weekly</em></a> reported in 2009.

  • Denver Counts More Dispensaries Than Starbucks

    As of July 2011, the city of Denver <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/06/medical-marijuana-denver-starbucks_n_891796.html" target="_hplink">counted more medical marijuana dispensaries than Starbucks franchises</a>.