As "Fringe" draws to a much-anticipated close, we at HuffPost TV wanted to honor the series by inviting some of those who have covered the show throughout its run to reflect on their favorite "Fringe" memories; highlighting the powerful moments, gripping episodes and beloved characters who have entertained us for the past five seasons.

Those taking part include TV Guide Magazine's Damian Holbrook, Hitfix writer Ryan McGee, Marisa Roffman of Give Me My Remote, TVGuide.com's Natalie Abrams, Matt Mitovich of TVLine and HuffPost TV's Laura Prudom and Mo Ryan.

Check out the slideshow below for our favorite "Fringe" episodes and moments, and read on to find out what we'll miss most about the series.

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  • Favorite Episode

    "Peter" Not only did it provide critical backstory, but grounded the show's fantastical proceedings in something very intimate and extremely resonant. The story of a war between two universes turned into the story of a war between two fathers, both of whom loved their son so much that they would ultimately (and unwittingly) put everyone else at risk to achieve this goal. -- Ryan McGee, Hitfix

  • Favorite Episode

    "Marionette" My favorite episode is probably Season 3's "Marionette," for several reasons. First, I was on set for the filming of Peter and Olivia's first meeting following her escape from the alt-universe, when she confronted him for not knowing he'd been sleeping with Bolivia. It was dynamic, emotional work by Josh and Anna, who killed it in the scenes at her apartment, as Liv realized how deeply her lookalike had taken over her life. It was also one of the rare times Torv, Jackson and John Noble sat down as a group to discuss the show and it was an immense thrill to watch them bounce ideas and opinions off one another. And finally, the episode is "Fringe" at its gruesome best, with the suicide counselor trying to revive his lost obsession with harvested body parts and that horrifying puppet mechanism. That business haunted me for days! -- Damian Holbrook, TV Guide Magazine

  • Favorite Episode

    "Making Angels" I’m a sucker for all things Astrid, who so rarely got a chance to shine over the years. But “Making Angels,” in which alt-Astrid — or Kick-Astrid, as I like to call her — crossed universes to seek understanding from Astrid after her father passed away, pulled at my heartstrings just as much as any of Fringe’s other major moments did. She’s also secretly my favorite character — even when she had no lines. -- Natalie Abrams, TVGuide.com

  • Favorite Episode

    "Entrada" I'm of the opinion that the "Jacksonville"-"The Day We Died" stretch is by far the greatest period of "Fringe," and the episode that always stands out most to me from that is "Entrada." The show took a big chance by alternating between our universe and Over There for the beginning part of Season 3, but when everything came to a head in "Entrada," it exploded brilliantly. Every actor was on their A-game as Peter, Walter, and the rest of the Fringe team realized how deeply they had been betrayed by Fauxlivia, and Olivia tried to find a way home from Over There. Plus, it gave us the best Walter term ever ("vagenda"), so it could win my vote on those grounds alone. -- Marisa Roffman, Give Me My Remote

  • Favorite Episode

    "Peter" I imagine this will be a common refrain, but for its incredibly satisfying yet equally haunting combination of exposition and emotion, "Peter" is the one episode that left the biggest mark. Just thinking about, and not even tracking down the DVD and cuing up, the scene where we see the blink-and-you-missed-it moment where Walternate turned-and-he-missed-it, the indicator that he'd found a cure for Peter, makes my eyes well up. -- Matt Mitovich, TVLine

  • Favorite Episode

    "White Tulip" While "Peter" was undoubtedly the story that first made me realize how truly special "Fringe" could be, the episode that always comes to mind when I think of the show's emotional impact is the one that aired two weeks later. "White Tulip" explored mankind's enduring struggle with science versus faith by bringing that huge philosophical debate down to a human level, not only allowing us to witness Walter's remorse in a relatable way, but also showing us his <em>soul</em> for the first time. Here was a man with Godlike knowledge, finally embracing the fact that even the keenest mind cannot hope to understand <em>everything</em> in the universe. For me, his desire for redemption, and the letter at the episode's poignant, affecting denouement remains the best illustration of what "Fringe" is capable of -- <a href="https://twitter.com/TVGMDamian/status/292344392772096000/photo/1">especially after the fans utilized that symbol at Comic-Con</a> to express their love for the series. -- Laura Prudom, The Huffington Post

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    The episode? "Ability". The moment? When Olivia turned out the lights left for her by David Robert Jones with her mind. Or did she? After all, Peter was standing there behind her. Did he turn them off? Did they work in concert? So much of the first season dealt with The Pattern. But here was the first instance in which we realized that our heroes weren't just solving it, but intimately associated with it as well. While there were plenty of nominally "bigger" moments in the show's history, here's one in which "Fringe" suddenly transformed from a good show to a great one. -- Ryan McGee, Hitfix

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    Favorite scene is impossible to pick. Alt-Astrid's face when Astrid presented her with coffee in s4's "The Consultant." The glimmer around Peter in "Jacksonville." The Twin Towers shot in Season 1's "There's More Than One of Everything." The woman's head exploding in tease of "The Cure." Liv flying out of her previously empty SUV in "A New Day in Old Town." Walter at the bus stop in "Snakehead." Our first look at Nina's bionic arm. Broyles seeing his alt-self's corpse in the back of the van. So many moments will stick with me long after the show is over. -- Damian Holbrook, TV Guide Magazine

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    There was nothing more shocking than in the Season 1 finale, “There’s More Than One of Everything,” when Olivia came face-to-face with William Bell and the camera panned out to reveal she was actually inside the World Trade Center, which, in the alternate universe, was still standing. The repercussions of that finale were endless. I remember spending that summer thinking, “What else is different in the alternate universe!?” -- Natalie Abrams, TVGuide.com

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    The show did a lot of really great emotional moments (and the Peter/Walter scene in "The Boy Must Live" is another fantastic example of that), but man, did they do cliffhangers like no other. I still get chills thinking about Olivia crossing Over There at the end of Season 1 and the camera pulling back to reveal that she was standing in the World Trade Center. And Peter literally disappearing in front of our eyes at the end of "The Day We Died"? My goodness. I literally bolted up at that reveal. -- Marisa Roffman, Give Me My Remote

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    Being a sucker for split-screen work and Torv times two, I'm tempted to go with any of the Olivia/Fauxlivia scenes. (Remember the doppelgangers' dust-up in Olivia's apartment?! Wowza.) But instead I am going to go with a moment that we long awaited, and was delivered just perfectly: Olivia, imprisoned Over There, getting word to Peter that he'd been living (and loving) with The Other One. (Close runner-up, just for the tear-jerking goodness: Etta revealing herself to "Dad.") -- Matt Mitovich, TVLine

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    As my compatriots have noted, picking a favorite scene is near impossible from a show that has given us so many heartbreaking, jaw-dropping moments. Most of the moments that come to mind involve our team and their alt-selves (the badass, alt-Lincoln was a particular favorite, especially once he was juxtaposed with our mild-mannered version), but the scene where Walter and Walternate bond over the son they lost and risked losing again in "Worlds Apart" was an emotional tour de force from John Noble, and yet another illustration of the willful ignorance of awards voters. -- Laura Prudom, The Huffington Post

Ryan McGee: I'll miss the show's optimistic, almost romantic view of the universe. I don't mean "romantic" in terms of characters falling in love. But "love" permeates the show in the form of compassion, from within the odd-yet-vital group of people that form the show's core group to the way that it humanizes the show's villains. There are infinite possibilities within the world of "Fringe," but the one constant is that everyone needs someone to make them feel whole. That sentiment might be too cheesy for some, but it's a central principle that has been in place almost from the start. The "villains" in the show more often than not weren't looking to conquer the world. They were looking to replace that which they had lost. Soon, "Fringe" fans will be looking to fill that void themselves.

Damian Holbrook: Most definitely, I will miss the fans' devotion to the series. They saved "Fringe" from cancelation over and over. Joel Wyman and Jeff Pinkner have said it countless times, and it's true. And that moment during the show's final Comic-Con panel last summer when the audience held up their white tulip drawings was a perfect example of how beautiful the fandom is. Not only did they get to express their love for the show, the cast and the creative team, but those people being saluted also got to see that their work had meant something to so many people. The energy and adoration and excitement in that room is something I will never forget.

Natalie Abrams: The Walterisms. From the first words Walter said to Peter on the series — telling him, “I thought you’d be fatter” — there was no filter to what Walter could get away with saying. Some highlights include: “I just pissed myself. Just a squirt.” “Feel his anus, it’s soaking wet.” “Excellent, let’s make some LSD.”

Marisa Roffman: It's cheesy, but I've been thinking about this a lot over the last several months. Of course I'll miss the show -- no question about that -- but I do think what I'll miss most is the people around the show. I've loved covering the show on a professional level, because they were a great group to work with. I've loved seeing the promos Ari Margolis whipped up, because they broke my brain every time. I've been blown away by this incredible fanbase who took it upon themselves to promote the show in whatever way they could. I'll miss the passion the show brought out in people.

Matt Mitovich: Having grown up on soap operas (with four older sisters who ruled the TV), I'm all about Evil Twins, so the alt-universe was always a big draw for me. I also relished the little Easter eggs planted throughout the Other Side, like Eric Stoltz having in fact landed the "Back to the Future" lead, and the nuances of life in 2036 (Walnuts as currency! Egg sticks!). But all in all, what I loved about "Fringe" is that, on most any given week, you never quite knew what you were going to get, to see, to experience, to marvel at.

Mo Ryan: Though the entire "Fringe" cast proved themselves versatile and capable of performing everything from light comedy to moving tragedy, the heart and the soul of the show was always John Noble's legendary performance as Walter Bishop. I'd argue that "Fringe" would have never been able to get away with all its experimentation without Noble's ability to ground everything in a deep sense of compassion and hope. No matter what Walter was doing -- tripping on LSD, lying to his son, agonizing over his mistakes, eating candy, dissecting a crispy corpse, making us all appreciate life's intrinsic absurdity -- you always felt for the guy. I will miss every version of Walter, in every timeline.

Laura Prudom: I came late to the series, having only caught up towards the end of the third season, so in some ways I feel like an impostor among this loyal collection of "Fringe" faithful, some of whom have been there from the show's inception. But the real power of "Fringe" is in its connections, whether you saw the pilot when it first aired or discovered it late on DVD or Netflix. Not only has it brought me closer to many of the passionate, generous reporters who took part in this piece, it has introduced me to some of the most inventive, enthusiastic and dedicated fans in the world; to the insanely talented and bafflingly underrated cast, crew and creative team who have taken us on this amazing journey; and to anyone who cares enough to read this post. As Ryan noted, "Fringe" is, first and foremost, a show about love, and what that love can inspire us to do, whether that means breaking the universe to save your child; erasing yourself from existence to save two worlds; bombarding a network with Red Vines to prove that people are paying attention; or standing up at a convention with a white tulip to express your appreciation for a show that touched your life. "Fringe" may be gone, but it will never be forgotten, and I think we're all a little better for having known it.

Read executive producer Joel Wyman's thoughts on the finale and the show's legacy here.

What will you miss most about "Fringe"? Share your favorite episode and most memorable moment below.

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