After five seasons, "Fringe" has come to an end.

The FOX show's two-hour series sendoff captured the biggest audience of the season, closing with 3.2 million viewers and a 1.0 rating in the adults 18 to 49 demographic -- about the same as the season 4 finale. Although the ratings aren't high for TV standards, it's a good finish for "Fringe," which debuted in Sept. 2008.

The season 5 premiere garnered 3.12 million viewers in the Friday 9 p.m. time slot, while season 4 debuted with 3.48 million viewers.

"Fringe" attracted an intense cult following, despite being a ratings lightweight. FOX's entertainment chairman Kevin Reilly has always stood by the series, saying that while "Fringe" wasn't for everyone, it gave sci-fi fans (and critics) a show to count on.

"'Fringe' has been a point of pride,” Reilly once said, according to Entertainment Weekly. “I share the passion for the show the fans have. I love that Fox, after letting down genre fans over the years [came through with 'Fringe'].”

Did you watch the series finale of "Fringe"?

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  • Favorite Episode

    "Peter" Not only did it provide critical backstory, but grounded the show's fantastical proceedings in something very intimate and extremely resonant. The story of a war between two universes turned into the story of a war between two fathers, both of whom loved their son so much that they would ultimately (and unwittingly) put everyone else at risk to achieve this goal. -- Ryan McGee, Hitfix

  • Favorite Episode

    "Marionette" My favorite episode is probably Season 3's "Marionette," for several reasons. First, I was on set for the filming of Peter and Olivia's first meeting following her escape from the alt-universe, when she confronted him for not knowing he'd been sleeping with Bolivia. It was dynamic, emotional work by Josh and Anna, who killed it in the scenes at her apartment, as Liv realized how deeply her lookalike had taken over her life. It was also one of the rare times Torv, Jackson and John Noble sat down as a group to discuss the show and it was an immense thrill to watch them bounce ideas and opinions off one another. And finally, the episode is "Fringe" at its gruesome best, with the suicide counselor trying to revive his lost obsession with harvested body parts and that horrifying puppet mechanism. That business haunted me for days! -- Damian Holbrook, TV Guide Magazine

  • Favorite Episode

    "Making Angels" I’m a sucker for all things Astrid, who so rarely got a chance to shine over the years. But “Making Angels,” in which alt-Astrid — or Kick-Astrid, as I like to call her — crossed universes to seek understanding from Astrid after her father passed away, pulled at my heartstrings just as much as any of Fringe’s other major moments did. She’s also secretly my favorite character — even when she had no lines. -- Natalie Abrams, TVGuide.com

  • Favorite Episode

    "Entrada" I'm of the opinion that the "Jacksonville"-"The Day We Died" stretch is by far the greatest period of "Fringe," and the episode that always stands out most to me from that is "Entrada." The show took a big chance by alternating between our universe and Over There for the beginning part of Season 3, but when everything came to a head in "Entrada," it exploded brilliantly. Every actor was on their A-game as Peter, Walter, and the rest of the Fringe team realized how deeply they had been betrayed by Fauxlivia, and Olivia tried to find a way home from Over There. Plus, it gave us the best Walter term ever ("vagenda"), so it could win my vote on those grounds alone. -- Marisa Roffman, Give Me My Remote

  • Favorite Episode

    "Peter" I imagine this will be a common refrain, but for its incredibly satisfying yet equally haunting combination of exposition and emotion, "Peter" is the one episode that left the biggest mark. Just thinking about, and not even tracking down the DVD and cuing up, the scene where we see the blink-and-you-missed-it moment where Walternate turned-and-he-missed-it, the indicator that he'd found a cure for Peter, makes my eyes well up. -- Matt Mitovich, TVLine

  • Favorite Episode

    "White Tulip" While "Peter" was undoubtedly the story that first made me realize how truly special "Fringe" could be, the episode that always comes to mind when I think of the show's emotional impact is the one that aired two weeks later. "White Tulip" explored mankind's enduring struggle with science versus faith by bringing that huge philosophical debate down to a human level, not only allowing us to witness Walter's remorse in a relatable way, but also showing us his <em>soul</em> for the first time. Here was a man with Godlike knowledge, finally embracing the fact that even the keenest mind cannot hope to understand <em>everything</em> in the universe. For me, his desire for redemption, and the letter at the episode's poignant, affecting denouement remains the best illustration of what "Fringe" is capable of -- <a href="https://twitter.com/TVGMDamian/status/292344392772096000/photo/1">especially after the fans utilized that symbol at Comic-Con</a> to express their love for the series. -- Laura Prudom, The Huffington Post

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    The episode? "Ability". The moment? When Olivia turned out the lights left for her by David Robert Jones with her mind. Or did she? After all, Peter was standing there behind her. Did he turn them off? Did they work in concert? So much of the first season dealt with The Pattern. But here was the first instance in which we realized that our heroes weren't just solving it, but intimately associated with it as well. While there were plenty of nominally "bigger" moments in the show's history, here's one in which "Fringe" suddenly transformed from a good show to a great one. -- Ryan McGee, Hitfix

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    Favorite scene is impossible to pick. Alt-Astrid's face when Astrid presented her with coffee in s4's "The Consultant." The glimmer around Peter in "Jacksonville." The Twin Towers shot in Season 1's "There's More Than One of Everything." The woman's head exploding in tease of "The Cure." Liv flying out of her previously empty SUV in "A New Day in Old Town." Walter at the bus stop in "Snakehead." Our first look at Nina's bionic arm. Broyles seeing his alt-self's corpse in the back of the van. So many moments will stick with me long after the show is over. -- Damian Holbrook, TV Guide Magazine

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    There was nothing more shocking than in the Season 1 finale, “There’s More Than One of Everything,” when Olivia came face-to-face with William Bell and the camera panned out to reveal she was actually inside the World Trade Center, which, in the alternate universe, was still standing. The repercussions of that finale were endless. I remember spending that summer thinking, “What else is different in the alternate universe!?” -- Natalie Abrams, TVGuide.com

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    The show did a lot of really great emotional moments (and the Peter/Walter scene in "The Boy Must Live" is another fantastic example of that), but man, did they do cliffhangers like no other. I still get chills thinking about Olivia crossing Over There at the end of Season 1 and the camera pulling back to reveal that she was standing in the World Trade Center. And Peter literally disappearing in front of our eyes at the end of "The Day We Died"? My goodness. I literally bolted up at that reveal. -- Marisa Roffman, Give Me My Remote

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    Being a sucker for split-screen work and Torv times two, I'm tempted to go with any of the Olivia/Fauxlivia scenes. (Remember the doppelgangers' dust-up in Olivia's apartment?! Wowza.) But instead I am going to go with a moment that we long awaited, and was delivered just perfectly: Olivia, imprisoned Over There, getting word to Peter that he'd been living (and loving) with The Other One. (Close runner-up, just for the tear-jerking goodness: Etta revealing herself to "Dad.") -- Matt Mitovich, TVLine

  • Favorite Scene or Moment

    As my compatriots have noted, picking a favorite scene is near impossible from a show that has given us so many heartbreaking, jaw-dropping moments. Most of the moments that come to mind involve our team and their alt-selves (the badass, alt-Lincoln was a particular favorite, especially once he was juxtaposed with our mild-mannered version), but the scene where Walter and Walternate bond over the son they lost and risked losing again in "Worlds Apart" was an emotional tour de force from John Noble, and yet another illustration of the willful ignorance of awards voters. -- Laura Prudom, The Huffington Post