A controversial Republican legislator, infamous for his extreme anti-abortion views, is again making headlines after an interview on a conservative Christian talk show.

Glenn Grothman, a state senator from Wisconsin, told Jim Schneider of "Voice of Christian Youth America" that Planned Parenthood is "the most racist organization” in the nation and has a tradition of "not liking people who are not white." He also charged that the non-profit health services group aggressively targets the Asian-American community for "sex-selective abortions," a practice that Planned Parenthood has repeatedly condemned.

"Gender bias is contrary to everything our organization works for daily in communities across the country. Planned Parenthood opposes racism and sexism in all forms, and we work to advance equity and human rights in the delivery of health care," the organization wrote in a press release. "Planned Parenthood condemns sex selection motivated by gender bias, and urges leaders to challenge the underlying conditions that lead to these beliefs and practices, including addressing the social, legal, economic, and political conditions that promote gender bias and lead some to value one gender over the other."

In his interview, Grothman also cited as evidence "the historic comments" of Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood. Grothman implies, as have others in the past, the founder was a racist. Yet Salon notes that in 1966, civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. spoke of "a striking kinship between our movement and Margaret Sanger’s early efforts."

Grothman, an aggressive anti-abortion crusader and proponent of the nuclear family in Wisconsin, has made no secret of his often controversial opinions in the past. In March, he drew widespread criticism after a proposing a bill that would have classified single parenthood a contributing factor to child abuse.

He has also said that unwanted pregnancies are the fault of the mothers, and that many mothers lie about the circumstances of their pregnancies. "I think a lot of women are adopting the single motherhood lifestyle because the government creates a situation in which it is almost preferred," he said, according to Right Wing Watch.

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