-- The Detroit Tigers have agreed to a one-year, $6,725,000 contract with right-hander Max Scherzer and avoided salary arbitration.

Scherzer was 16-7 last season with a 3.74 and struck out 231, a total that trailed only teammate Justin Verlander. He was 1-0 with a 2.08 ERA in the postseason, helping Detroit reach the World Series.

The Tigers acquired Scherzer after the 2009 season from Arizona as part of a three-team trade that sent Curtis Granderson to the New York Yankees and Edwin Jackson to the Diamondbacks. They also acquired Austin Jackson and Phil Coke in the deal. Scherzer has had a winning record in each of his three seasons with the Tigers and is 52-42 in his career.

___

AP Sports Writer Ronald Blum in New York contributed to this report.

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Kirk Gibson's Walk-Off Home Run

    A dramatic home run by Detroit Tigers' Kirk Gibson against San Diego Padres' pitcher Goose Gossage in the 1984 World Series. Tiger's manager Sparky Anderson can be overheard yelling and laughing, "You don't want to walk him!" (YouTube: CourtsideTweets)

  • Ty Cobb's Detroit

    When Ty Cobb retired following the 1928 season and after 24 years of major league baseball experience, he left holding more records than anyone in baseball history then and since. A number of his personal records have since been surpassed, but his lifetime batting average of .366 is locked down forever. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Reindeer Games

    Bobby Veach is sitting on a reindeer in a lighter moment during spring training in Macon, Georgia, Detroit's second spring training site during this era. Veach could hit, compiling a .311 batting average over his 12 seasons with Detroit. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • That Moon Up There

    Teams started playing night games in 1935, but not the TIgers. "When I played ball I played in the sunshine and I can't reconcile that moon up there with a game of baseball," said owner Walter O. Briggs. "Night ball seems to me like another game." But they finally followed suit with the first late home game on June 15, 1948. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press. <em>CORRECTION: A previous version of the above text stated major league baseball teams started playing night games in 1939, when it is in fact 1935. The Tigers played their first night game, an away game, in 1939.</em>

  • Boys Of Summer

    Film of the 1968 Tigers winning the American League pennant, paving their way for a victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series. (YouTube: sharkstv)

  • Wave The White Flag

    Bobo Newsom signals that the Tigers surrender. In the second game of a doubleheader on August, 19, 1941, the Yankees shelled the home team 8-3. Newsom, known for his sense of humor and lack of restraint, show the white flag to the enemy. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Bless You Boys

    A hilarious promo video from 1984, the last time the Tiger's won the World Series. "Bless You Boys" was a popular slogan and song during that year. The clip features some fun 80's cameos by Boy George and Tom Selleck of Magnum P.I. fame. (Youtube: ps2dude13)

  • The American Way

    An Independence Day doubleheader attracted a full house of 57,633 on July 4, 1940, with many standing throughout both games. Detroit beat the Indians in the first game and lost in the second. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • What's The Frequency, Tyson?

    Ty Tyson made Detroit Tiger History on April 19, 1927 when he broadcast the first Tiger game over radio station WWJ. His broadcast introduction became household words as remote fans heard him say: "Hello boys and girls, this is Ty Tyson coming to you from Navin Field," over and over again. Tyson is shown at the microphone for a game on August 26, 1935. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • It's A Man's, Man's, Man's World

    Mostly men and some women buying tickets, which cost $1.50, on Sept. 20, 1944. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Soul Decision

    Marvin Gaye opens up game four of of the 1968 World Series with his rendition of the national anthem. (Youtube: ricksuchow)

  • The In-Crowd

    A crowd gathers for a 1945 World Series game at Briggs Stadium along Trumbull Avenue. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Last Salute

    Hank Greenberg is congratulated after hitting a home run in his last game before joining the army, May 6, 1941. Greeting Greenberg, left to right: Schoolboy Rowe, Hal Newhouser, Al Benton, Bing Miller and Dick Bartell. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Way Up High

    Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Run This Town

    Ticket office staff on Sept. 24, 1940. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • This Magic Moment

    Winning pitcher Tommy Bridges hugs catcher Birdie Tebbetts after striking out Frank McCormick for the final out in game 3 of the 1940 World Series, October 4. Buck Newsom told Bridges: "You took care of 'em today: the rest of us will take care of 'em from now on." Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Smile!

    Starting pitcher in Game 7 of the World Series, Bobo Newsom, greets Spike Briggs and his wife, Laura, while Schoolboy Rowe takes a picture, October 8, 1940. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Celebration

    A classic film clip of the 1935 Tigers' World Series win. That year Detroit's team was victorious against the Chicago Cubs. (Youtube: adguy6)

  • Bruising Play

    In a costly out, Hank Greenberg, the slider, tried to score from first on Pet Fox's single to right but was tagged out by Cubs catcher Gabby Hartnett in the seventh inning of game 2, October 3, 1935. X-rays later showed that the American League's Most Valuable Player had broken a bone in his wrist. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Most Valuable Player

    Goose Goslin had a wonderful relationship with fans and he accommodated their desire for his attention. Two young sisters wrote a letter to <em>Detroit Times</em> baseball writer Bud Shaver sending money for a present for Goslin after it was learned he would be leaving the Tigers after the 1937 season. Shaver replied with a quote from Goslin: "When kids cheer for you they mean it and you know it. They don't change. They aren't like some grown-ups who pat you on the back and book you the same day. That's why I love kids and not many grown-ups." Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • GO GET 'UM

    This clip features a Detroit Tigers theme song from 1968, when the Tigers' beat the St. Louis Cardinals to win the World Series. The video also features images of old TIgers' logos, playing fields and championship teams. (Youtube: kvnvan)

  • King Of The Open Road

    Charlie Gehringer is presented with the keys to a new automobile, a gift from a cereal company for winning a popularity contest as the best second baseman in the major leagues, August 17, 1938. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Everything about Charlie Gehringer was smooth, and because his fielding seemed so automatic they called him the "Mechanical Man," a moniker Gehringer didn't like because it implied that fielding for him was effortless; he knew different. Photos from the <em>Detroit News</em> archives, use and captions courtesy of Wayne State University Press.

  • Glory Days

    Some classic film from the 1945 World Series featuring the Detroit Tigers vs. the Chicago Cubs.