LITTLETON, Colo. — It was little surprise when freshman Republican Rep. Mike Coffman in 2010 voted against a bill to grant citizenship to some young illegal immigrants. After all, the Marine Corps veteran had just won the seat in Congress formerly held by firebrand Rep. Tom Tancredo, who had pushed the GOP to take a harsher stance against illegal immigration.

The bill, known as the DREAM Act, died in the Senate.

Now Coffman has changed course. He has introduced legislation to let unauthorized immigrants brought into the country as children earn citizenship if they serve in the military. And he spoke hopefully about an immigration overhaul that a bipartisan group of senators outlined last week.

Since the November elections, many other Republicans nationwide have tempered their tone on immigration – if not reversed course completely – after years of tacking right to appeal to grass-roots activists who dominate GOP primaries.

On Tuesday, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor became the latest high-profile Republican to shift gears. A leader of the conservative caucus and previous opponent of the DREAM Act, Cantor called for allowing illegal immigrants brought here as children to become citizens.

Coffman won re-election by only 2 points and is a top target for Democrats next year. But Coffman says his change of heart is personal: He met a constituent who served as a Marine and lost his legs in an IED explosion in Afghanistan. The man was a Canadian immigrant who became a citizen, and his brother joined the military and became a citizen, too. Coffman also recalls a former Spanish tutor telling him about the lack of opportunity for young illegal immigrants.

"For young people who grew up in this country, and don't know another country, to not be able to serve in the military..." Coffman said, trailing off. He said the broader overhaul "seems to be moving in the right direction."

All this suggests that the Republican Party seems to have gotten the message after its shellacking last fall, though it is still unclear whether softer stances will translate into broad enough support for an overhaul that includes a pathway to citizenship for the country's estimated 11 million illegal immigrants.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney won only 27 percent support from Hispanics and even less from Asians. And an AP-GFK poll last month showed 62 percent of voters want to let otherwise law-abiding illegal immigrants eventually become citizens, up 12 percentage points from 2010.

During the GOP presidential primaries, Romney wooed the party's right flank by echoing their rhetoric on immigration and advocating "self-deportation," or making life in the U.S. so miserable for illegal immigrants they would voluntarily return home. His campaign staff later said they regretted the sharp turn because it alienated minority voters.

Now Republicans are trying to get them back. "All of their campaign consultants are telling them that the end is near if they don't change," said Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington, which advocates tighter immigration restrictions. He added that Republicans have long-favored a narrower version of the DREAM Act – formally, the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act – which would legalize the status of people brought here illegally as children who graduate from college or serve in the military.

The shift has been particularly dramatic in the West, where the most recent wave of illegal immigration began in the 1990s and the GOP's tough response helped drive Hispanic votes to newly ascendant Democrats.

In California, a handful of GOP state legislators joined Democratic colleagues at a news conference last week to back a pathway to citizenship in any immigration overhaul. In Nevada, where immigrant votes have given Democrats a lopsided edge in recent elections, the state Republican Party last week endorsed legalizing the status of unauthorized immigrants.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain is now one of eight senators pushing for an overhaul, along with Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake. McCain had co-sponsored an immigration overhaul that died in 2005, but he disowned the plan while running for president in 2008, and he ran an ad in his 2010 Senate campaign calling for completion of the "danged fence" on the Mexican border.

Colorado, where Hispanics comprised 14 percent of the electorate in November, was solidly red at the beginning of the past decade, when Republicans pushed aggressive measures against illegal immigrants and some Democrats joined them. Since then, the state has twice helped elect President Barack Obama, and Democrats have controlled the state Legislature for three of the last four elections. Hispanics also helped defeat tea party favorite Ken Buck in his 2010 challenge of Sen. Michael Bennet.

Now Buck, well-known for aggressive enforcement of immigration laws as Weld County district attorney, has joined The Colorado Compact, a coalition of politicians, business and community groups that backs a "sensible path forward" for some illegal immigrants.

After years of blocking in-state tuition for illegal immigrants at state colleges and universities, some Republican state lawmakers have decided to support the measure. And congressmen like Coffman are taking a warmer stance toward the idea of a broader immigration overhaul – though it remains uncertain whether they will ultimately vote for citizenship for most illegal immigrants, the goal of immigration rights activists and Obama.

Colorado State Sen. Greg Brophy has kept quiet as he's voted against in-state tuition in recent years. He's been thinking of the high school students he meets in his rural district who are bright, ambitious and here without authorization. Now he supports it. "It tugs at your heart," Brophy said. "I'm positive I'm not alone in it, given the emails I've gotten."

Immigration advocates are heartened.

"There's a sea change that's happening in our politics," Bennet, who worked on the latest bipartisan immigration proposal, said last week in Denver. "Republicans and Democrats alike believe that big numbers of people in this country want to get this finished."

Even so, Colorado Rep. Cory Gardner, one of the state's few GOP stars, balks at the idea of citizenship, though he speaks forcefully about the need to appeal to minorities.

He said Congress must first secure the border before discussing citizenship. "If you address that first, we can have a conversation down the road."

___

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  • Seventeen-year-old Alexa Bailon, left, holds up her ID card as she testifies on a tuition bill before the Senate Education committee at the Capitol in Denver on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. The sponsors of the bill that would give illegal immigrants in Colorado in-state tuition rates are Senators Mike Johnston, center, D-Denver and Angela Giron, right, D-Pueblo. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Sonia Gutierrez testifies on a tuition bill before the Senate Education committee at the Capitol in Denver on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. The bill would give illegal immigrants in Colorado in-state tuition rates. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Gail Klapper with Colorado Forum testifies on a tuition bill before the Senate Education committee at the Capitol in Denver on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. The sponsors of the bill that would give illegal immigrants in Colorado in-state tuition rates are Senators Mike Johnston, center, D-Denver and Angela Giron, right, D-Pueblo. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia testifies on a tuition bill before the Senate Education committee at the Capitol in Denver on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. One of the sponsors of the bill that would give illegal immigrants in Colorado in-state tuition rates Angela Giron, D-Pueblo listens at left. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Latino students from Escuela Tlatelolco, a Denver K-12 school, sit together inside the Colorado State Capitol building following a news conference and rally presenting a bill that could make the children of illegal immigrants eligible for in-state tuition, in Denver, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • Latina high school students attend a news conference and rally presenting a bill that could make the children of illegal immigrants eligible for in-state tuition, at the State Capitol in Denver, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • Colorado State Representative Crisanta Duran hugs high school student Cesiah Trejo, after Trejo spoke at a news conference and rally presenting a bill that could make the children of illegal immigrants eligible for in-state tuition, at the State Capitol in Denver, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • Claudia Trejo

    Claudia Trejo, a 17-year-old Denver high school student is pictured in between classes at her school on Monday, April 16, 2012. Trejo who came to Denver illegally with her family when she was eleven wants to continue her education at a Colorado university. Colorado lawmakers are considering whether undocumented student should have similar benefits to legal state students. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Jesus Gerardo Noriega

    In this Jan. 4, 2012 photo Jesus Gerardo Noriega, front, poses for his picture at the family home in Aurora, Colo. Jesus, 21, faced deportation last year after he was arrested for driving with no license plate light. Noriega's family brought him to the United States from Mexico when he was 9. His parents and three brothers live here legally, and he graduated from high school here. He learned in December that the case against him was being closed. U.S. prosecutors in Denver and Baltimore are reviewing thousands of deportation cases to determine which illegal immigrants might stay in the country. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Jessie Ulibarri

    ** CORRECTS TITLE OF JESSIE ULIBARRI TO ACLU PUBLIC POLICY DIRECTOR ** ACLU Public Policy Director Jessie Ulibarri, front, speaks at a rally at the Capitol in Denver on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011, to protest Gov. Bill Ritters announcement that Colorado will participate in a federal program aimed at identifying illegal immigrants when thery're booked into jails. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Jorge Gutierrez

    FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2011 file photo, California guard Jorge Gutierrez answers a question during the PAC-12 Conference NCAA college basketball media day, in Los Angeles. An illegal immigrant, his parents, Bertha and Fernando, dropped their son off in Denver, helped him sign up for school and then returned to their hectic lives in Chihuahua, Mexico, to work and care for two older sons. It was an excruciating choice for the tight-knit family. (AP Photo/Gus Ruelas, File)

  • Kairi Shepard

    This undated photo provided May 25, 2012 by Kairi Shepard shows Shepard in Colorado. Attorneys are scrambling to find a way to prevent the deportation of Shepard, who was adopted from an orphanage in India when she was 3-months-old following the determination by the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that she is an illegal immigrant. Kairi Shepherd's adoptive mother died when she was 8-years-old, never having filed citizenship paperwork, according to her attorney. (AP Photo/Kairi Shepard)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    AURORA, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra (L), her husband Salvador and their children Luna, 7, and Roberto, 5, leave their Aurora apartment building for an immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Aurora, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Supporters of undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra show their support during Vizguerra's immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release a verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Supporters of undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra show their support during Vizguerra's immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release a verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra (C), is embraced as her husband Salvador and son Roberto, 5, hold hands before her immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. The court decided it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra weeps after a tough immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra is comforted by pastor Anne Dunlap after Vizguerra's tough immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. The court said it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra speaks to supporters after her immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra (L), her husband Salvador and their children Luna, 7, and Roberto, 5, walk to her immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra (L), her husband Salvador and their children Luna, 7, and Roberto, 5, walk to her immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Supporters of undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra show their support during Vizguerra's immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. At the hearing, the court said it would not release a verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Attends Deportation Hearing

    DENVER, CO - JULY 13: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra is comforted by pastor Anne Dunlap after Vizguerra's tough immigration hearing in federal court on July 13, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. The court said it would not release it's verdict on her possible deportation until October, leaving her and her family in continued uncertainty. Vizguerra is a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Faces Deportation

    DENVER, CO - JULY 10: Undocumented Mexican immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra holds her daughter Zury, 5 months, while speaking about immigrant rights issues with fellow Mexican immigrants on July 10, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. Vizguerra, a mother of four children, three of whom were born in the U.S. as American citizens, is facing a deportation hearing July 13 at Denver's Federal Courthouse. If Vizguerra is deported back to Mexico, she says her husband and children will stay on in the United States. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband and first child 14 years before. Now an activist for the immigration advocate group Rights For All People, she also owns a janitorial service and says she has always paid state and federal taxes on her income. Some two years ago she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and taken to jail when she could not prove her legal immigration status. Out on bail during court proceedings, she now faces the real possibility that she will be deported to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrant Mother Of American Children Faces Deportation

    AURORA, CO - MAY 30: Undocumented Mexican immigrants Jeanette Vizguerra and her husband Salvador hold their three month old daughter Zury in their family apartment on May 30, 2011 in Aurora, Colorado. Vizguerra, a mother of three American children, is facing a deportation hearing July 13 at Denver's Federal Courthouse. Just one of millions of undocumented immigrants living in the United States, Vizguerra first came to Colorado from Mexico City with her husband 14 years before. Now a community activist for immigration rights and a small business owner of a janitorial service, she was stopped by a traffic policemen for driving with expired tags and was taken to jail when she could not prove she was in the country legally. She has been out on bail for two years during lengthy court proceedings, but now faces the real possibility that she will be deported back to Mexico and separated from her family in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • TO GO WITH AFP STORY by SHAUN TANDON, US

    TO GO WITH AFP STORY by SHAUN TANDON, US-China-immigration-history-minority US Representative Mike Coffman, a Republican from Colorado, speaks to reporters on May 26, 2011 at the US House of Representatives in Washington, DC, in front of a reproduction of a 19th-century sign that aimed to stir up opposition to Chinese immigration in the United States. Coffman has thrown his support behind a bill supported by Asian-Americans that would offer an official statement of regret for the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act that severely curtailed immigration. AFP PHOTO/SHAUN TANDON (Photo credit should read SHAUN TANDON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Jerry Anttila

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  • An unidentified immigration reform advocate, center, is led away by Denver Police Department officers after she and 13 other protesters were arrested for blocking a street in front of the Federal Courthouse in downtown Denver on Tuesday, June 15, 2010. The group, which had more than 100 protesters, marched from the Colorado state Capitol to the federal courts to call for changes in the nation's immigration laws. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

  • Immigration reform advocates march to the Federal Courthouse in downtown Denver on Tuesday, June 15, 2010. The group, which had more than 100 protesters, marched from the Colorado state Capitol to the federal courts to call for changes in the nation's immigration laws. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

  • Carla Gonzalez

    Carla Gonzalez, center, talks about Arizona's immigration law during a protest at the Capitol in Denver on Friday, April 30, 2010. Hundreds of Latino high school student walked out of Denver area high schools Friday afternoon and gathered at the Capitol to protest the Arizona immigration law. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

  • Coloradans Hold Tax Day Tea Party Rallies

    DENVER - APRIL 15: Conservative demonstrators argue against illegal immigration at a 'Tax Day Tea Party' protest at the state capitol building on April 15, 2010 in Denver, Colorado. Tea Party groups held anti-government protests nationwide on the day when Americans must file their annual income tax returns. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Coloradans Hold Tax Day Tea Party Rallies

    DENVER - APRIL 15: A protester demands immigration reform while demonstrating across the street from a 'Tax Day Tea Party' event at the state capitol building on April 15, 2010 in Denver, Colorado. Tea Party groups held anti-government protests nationwide on the day when Americans must file their annual income tax returns. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

  • Immigrants Rally And Hold Boycotts Nationwide

    DENVER - MAY 01: Demonstrators march down Speer Avenue and through the streets of Denver from Viking Park to the Colorado State Capitol building to protest United States immigration policy May 1, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. Immigrants and their supporters around the nation are rallying together through marches and demonstrations, along with boycotting work and spending, in a consolidated effort to show their importance throughout American society as the ongoing political debate on immigration reform continues. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

  • Immigrants Rally And Hold Boycotts Nationwide

    DENVER - MAY 01: Demonstrators rally on the steps to the Capitol after marching through the streets of Denver from Viking Park to the Colorado State Capitol building to protest United States immigration policy May 1, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. Immigrants and their supporters around the nation are rallying together through marches and demonstrations, along with boycotting work and spending, in a consolidated effort to show their importance throughout American society as the ongoing political debate on immigration reform continues. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

  • Immigrants Rally And Hold Boycotts Nationwide

    DENVER - MAY 01: Demonstrators march down Speer Avenue and through the streets of Denver from Viking Park to the Colorado State Capitol building to protest United States immigration policy May 1, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. Immigrants and their supporters around the nation are rallying together through marches and demonstrations, along with boycotting work and spending, in a consolidated effort to show their importance throughout American society as the ongoing political debate on immigration reform continues. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

  • Immigrants Rally And Hold Boycotts Nationwide

    DENVER - MAY 01: Demonstrators march down Speer Avenue and through the streets of Denver from Viking Park to the Colorado State Capitol building to protest United States immigration policy May 1, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. Immigrants and their supporters around the nation are rallying together through marches and demonstrations, along with boycotting work and spending, in a consolidated effort to show their importance throughout American society as the ongoing political debate on immigration reform continues. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

  • Immigrants Rally And Hold Boycotts Nationwide

    DENVER - MAY 01: Demonstrators march down Speer Avenue and through the streets of Denver from Viking Park to the Colorado State Capitol building to protest United States immigration policy May 1, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. Immigrants and their supporters around the nation are rallying together through marches and demonstrations, along with boycotting work and spending, in a consolidated effort to show their importance throughout American society as the ongoing political debate on immigration reform continues. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

  • Immigrants Rally And Hold Boycotts Nationwide

    DENVER - MAY 01: Demonstrators march down Speer Avenue and through the streets of Denver from Viking Park to the Colorado State Capitol building to protest United States immigration policy May 1, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. Immigrants and their supporters around the nation are rallying together through marches and demonstrations, along with boycotting work and spending, in a consolidated effort to show their importance throughout American society as the ongoing political debate on immigration reform continues. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

  • Students Walk Out Of Denver Schools To Protest Immigration Bill

    DENVER - APRIL 19: Stephanie Ramos, 12, participates in a rally of about 3,000 middle and high school students who walked out of school April 19, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. The students gathered on the steps of the Colorado state Capitol to demonstrate in support of immigrant rights and against U.S. Congressional immigration reform proposals. (Photo by Kevin Moloney/Getty Images)

  • Students Walk Out Of Denver Schools To Protest Immigration Bill

    DENVER - APRIL 19: Adrian Campos, 16, holds a U.S. flag during a rally with about 3,000 middle and high school students who walked out of school April 19, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. The students gathered on the steps of the Colorado state Capitol to demonstrate in support of immigrant rights and against U.S. Congressional immigration reform proposals. (Photo by Kevin Moloney/Getty Images)

  • Students Walk Out Of Denver Schools To Protest Immigration Bill

    DENVER - APRIL 19: Daisy Gonzales, 14, (L) displays a Mexican flag during a rally of about 3,000 middle and high school students who walked out of school April 19, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. The students gathered on the steps of the Colorado state Capitol to demonstrate in support of immigrant rights and against U.S. Congressional immigration reform proposals. (Photo by Kevin Moloney/Getty Images)

  • Students Walk Out Of Denver Schools To Protest Immigration Bill

    DENVER - APRIL 19: Denver area students who walked out of school carry Che Guevara banners during a rally April 19, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. About 3,000 middle and high school students gathered on the steps of the Colorado state Capitol to demonstrate in support of immigrant rights and against U.S. Congressional immigration reform proposals. (Photo by Kevin Moloney/Getty Images)