HuffPost Weird heard through the grapevine that the a Scottish zoo has been cranking up the Marvin Gaye in an effort to get their pandas in the mood for mating.

Partially because female pandas are only fertile for about two days a year, zookeepers have a notoriously difficult time getting them to reproduce.

Tian Tian, a panda at Edinburgh Zoo, will soon be entering that phase, and the staff is employing all sorts of tactics to convince Yang Guang, the zoo's male panda, how sweet it would be to be loved by her.

For one, they switched the panda's usual radio station (apparently, the pandas have a usual radio station) from Classic FM to Smooth radio, an easy listening station, the Mirror reported.

The station was so excited to be used as an instrument of sexual healing that they began playing a daily song request from the zoo. One of those requests? Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On."

Though it's impossible to know for sure what's going on inside a panda's head, a spokeswoman for Edinburgh Zoo did tell the Mirror that the music appears to relax and soothe Yang Guang.

Other methods to get the pandas ready and rarin' to go include exercise, extra bamboo, and mood lighting.

Last year, zookeepers said that Tian Tian and Yang Guang -- whose names mean "Sweetie" and "Sunshine" -- showed signs of attraction, but ultimately never sealed the deal.

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  • Male giant Panda Yang Guang (Sunshine) relaxes in his enclosure at Edinburgh Zoo on December 12, 2011. The pair of giant pandas that arrived in Britain from China on December 4 went on show to the media on December 12 before being fully presented to the public later in the week. It is hoped that the pandas, the first to live in the UK for 17 years, will eventually breed and give birth to cubs. AFP PHOTO

  • EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - DECEMBER 12: Yang Guang (L), the male panda, looks through the fence of his enclosure at Tian Tian as they make their first appearance in from of the media since arriving from China on December 12, 2011 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The eight-year-old pair of giant pandas arrived on a specially chartered flight from China over a week ago and are the first to live in the UK for 17 years. Edinburgh zoo are hopeful that the pandas will give birth to cubs during their 10 year stay in Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • Giant Panda Yang Guang (Sunshine) enjoys his meal of bamboo shoots while Tian Tian (Sweetie) takes a nap (not in picture) prior to a ceremony to send them off at the Wolong National Natural Reserve in China's southwest Sichuan province on November 3, 2011. The two giant pandas are set to arrive at Edinburgh Zoo in Scotland on a eagerly anticipated ten-year loan from China, agreed after years of high-level political and diplomatic negotiations. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

  • EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - DECEMBER 04: Chinese Panda Yang Guang arrives at Edinburgh Airport on December 4, 2011 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Tian Tian and Yang Guang, a pair of eight-year-old giant pandas arrived on a specially chartered flight and will be the first to live in the UK for 17 years. Edinburgh Zoo are hopeful that the pandas will give birth to cubs during their 10 year stay in Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • Male giant Panda Yang Guang (Sunshine) walks in his enclosure at Edinburgh Zoo on December 12, 2011. The pair of giant pandas that arrived in Britain from China on December 4 went on show to the media on December 12 before being fully presented to the public later in the week. It is hoped that the pandas, the first to live in the UK for 17 years, will eventually breed and give birth to cubs. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • Male giant Panda Yang Guang (Sunshine) relaxes with some bamboo in hand in his enclosure at Edinburgh Zoo on December 12, 2011. The pair of giant pandas that arrived in Britain from China on December 4 went on show to the media on December 12 before being fully presented to the public later in the week. It is hoped that the pandas, the first to live in the UK for 17 years, will eventually breed and give birth to cubs. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - DECEMBER 12: Yang Guang (L), the male panda, looks through the fence of his enclosure at Tian Tian as they make their first appearance in from of the media since arriving from China on December 12, 2011 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The eight-year-old pair of giant pandas arrived on a specially chartered flight from China over a week ago and are the first to live in the UK for 17 years. Edinburgh zoo are hopeful that the pandas will give birth to cubs during their 10 year stay in Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • Male giant Panda Yang Guang (Sunshine) walks in his enclosure at Edinburgh Zoo on December 12, 2011. The pair of giant pandas that arrived in Britain from China on December 4 went on show to the media on December 12 before being fully presented to the public later in the week. It is hoped that the pandas, the first to live in the UK for 17 years, will eventually breed and give birth to cubs. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - DECEMBER 12: Male panda Yang Guang makes his first appearance in front of the media since arriving from China on December 12, 2011 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The eight-year-old pair of giant pandas arrived on a specially chartered flight from China over a week ago and are the first to live in the UK for 17 years. Edinburgh zoo are hopeful that the pandas will give birth to cubs during their 10 year stay in Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - DECEMBER 16: Tian Tian the female panda bear looks out from her enclosure as members of the public view her for the first time at Edinburgh Zoo on December 16, 2011 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The eight-year-old pair of giant pandas arrived on a specially chartered flight from China over a week ago and are the first to live in the UK for 17 years. Edinburgh zoo are hopeful that the pandas will give birth to cubs during their 10 year stay in Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - DECEMBER 12: Female panda Tian Tian makes her first appearance in front of the media since arriving from China on December 12, 2011 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The eight-year-old pair of giant pandas arrived on a specially chartered flight from China over a week ago and are the first to live in the UK for 17 years. Edinburgh zoo are hopeful that the pandas will give birth to cubs during their 10 year stay in Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - DECEMBER 12: Female panda Tian Tian makes her first appearance in front of the media since arriving from China on December 12, 2011 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The eight-year-old pair of giant pandas arrived on a specially chartered flight from China over a week ago and are the first to live in the UK for 17 years. Edinburgh zoo are hopeful that the pandas will give birth to cubs during their 10 year stay in Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)