-- As of Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at least 2,059 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

The AP count is the same as the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EDT.

At least 1,710 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 119 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 11 were the result of hostile action.

The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is four more than the department's tally.

The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 18,333 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.

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The latest identifications reported by the military:

_Chief Warrant Officer James E. Groves III, 37, of Kettering, Ohio, died March 16 in Kandahar, Afghanistan; assigned to 3rd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.

_Spc. David T. Proctor, 26, of Greensboro, N.C., died March 13, at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., from injuries sustained during a noncombat-related incident on March 3, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armor Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

_Chief Petty Officer Christian Michael Pike, 31, of Peoria, Ariz., died March 13 in Landstuhl, Germany, as a result of combat-related injuries sustained on March 10 while conducting stability operations in Maiwand District, Afghanistan; assigned to a West Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit.

_Five soldiers died March 11, in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Killed were: Staff Sgt. Steven P. Blass, 27, of Estherville, Iowa, assigned to the 4th Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.; Chief Warrant Officer Bryan J. Henderson, 27, of Franklin, La., assigned to the 4th Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.; Capt. Sara M. Knutson, 27, of Eldersburg, Md., assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.; Staff Sgt. Marc A. Scialdo, 31, of Naples, Fla., assigned to the 603rd Aviation Support Battalion, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.; Spc. Zachary L. Shannon, 21, of Dunedin, Fla., assigned to the 4th Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.

_Two soldiers died March 11, in Jalrez District, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when they were attacked by small arms fire. Killed were: Capt. Andrew M. Pedersen-Keel, 28, of South Miami, Fla.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.; and Staff Sgt. Rex L. Schad, 26, of Edmond, Okla.; assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Armor Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

_Tech. Sgt. Larry D. Bunn, 43, of Bossier City, La., died March 7 as a result of a noncombat-related incident at an undisclosed base in Southwest Asia; assigned to the 307th Maintenance Squadron, Barksdale Air Force Base, La.

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  • The first Finest supermarket opened in 2006 in Wazir Akbar Khan, a traditionally chic Kabul neighborhood of embassies and NGO compounds. There are now five Finest supermarkets spread throughout the city. Initially, the store provided for the needs of international workers and those of the Afghan diaspora. Now most of its clients are Afghan: from the teenager who comes to drink his Red Bull to the mother looking for powdered milk and cosmetics. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Finest is more than just a supermarket. On Thursday nights, the music is turned up and young people fill the place. For Ajmal, a 23-year-old singer, there's really nowhere else to go out at night. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Finest™ sales assistants. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Kart-e Naw, Kabul. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • In 2005, Kabul City Center was the first modern shopping mall to open in the capital and included Afghanistan's first elevator and escalators. The Morocco Cafe, a hookah bar on the top floor, is frequented by young men from wealthy families. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Students from the American University at the recently opened Strikers, Afghanistan's first bowling alley. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Behind Sherpoor, the "poppy palace" district. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • A woman and her husband celebrate her birthday at Kabul Star, a chic hotel on the edge of the diplomatic enclave. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Omid and Massi, 22 and 19, respectively, both work in a United Nations compound. They often come to the Coffee Shop in the Kabul City Center mall at the end of their working day. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Katayoon watches a video of Selena Gomez. Katayoon is a student at the International School of Kabul, where lessons are given exclusively in English. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • The Blue Flame, a new pool and spa in Kabul. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • The restaurant in Strikers, Kabul's first bowling alley. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • A group of young men joke around on Kabul City Center's escalators. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • A man poses for a photo in a wedding hall. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Sparghai chooses a dress for a wedding she has been invited to. The average price is 100 dollars. Weddings are one of the few outings allowed for young Afghan women. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Abdul Hadi Stanikzai's family watching TV on a Friday afternoon. Stanikzai works at Kabul University. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • On Friday, visiting day in Afghanistan, Nafisa and her husband have tea in the guest living room. They live in a residential area of apartment complexes built during the communist regime, which remain very popular today. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Nafisa helps her daughter with her homework on Friday afternoon. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Nafisa's son watches Spiderman. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Rostam and his son Shams in his appartment in Shahrak-e Aria. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Stanikzai's wife in her fully-equipped kitchen. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Maryam is a university student who lives with her sister and their parents in an apartment in a new apartment complex on the northern edge of Kabul. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • Doorkhana skateboarding in Kabul. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)

  • On Wazir Akbar Khan hill. (Sandra Calligaro/Picture Tank)