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Jodi Arias Signed Manifesto 'In Case She Became Famous', Prosecutor Says

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JUAN MARTINEZ
Prosecutor Juan Martinez in court Monday. (Photo via Pool Camera) | In Session -- Pool Camera
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A key expert witness for murder defendant Jodi Arias admitted Monday under cross examination that she wrote a manifesto behind bars.

Prosecutor Juan Martinez mentioned the alleged manifesto for the first time Monday, stunning a packed courtroom audience.

"Do you remember when the defendant was in jail up in Yreka, [California] and the defendant’s manifesto ... Do you remember that was in your notes?" Martinez asked Psychotherapist Alyce LaViolette.

"I remember hearing about it [but] I've never seen it," she replied.

"Isn't it true that the defendant was signing or autographing copies of the manifesto?" asked Martinez.

"I believe those were my notes," LaViolette said.

Martinez interjected that Arias' writing of a manifesto appears to go against the idea that she lacks self-esteem – something LaViolette previously testified to. The domestic violence expert disagreed with his assumption.

"No, I don't think it does at all ... She may think she's a good writer ... but it doesn't mean [she has] high self-esteem," LaViolette said.

Martinez pointed out that Arias had asked someone to print out copies of the manifesto because she wanted them signed "in case ... she became famous."

The manifesto attributed to Arias was not entered into evidence Monday. The contents of it remain unclear. The Huffington Post has filed an official request with the prosecutor's office for a copy of the manifesto, but an official there said it could take some time for the request to be approved.

"In light of the prosecutor's ethical duties under ER 3.6, the State is seeking guidance from the Court on the nature and degree to which future public records requests could or should be fulfilled for the duration of the trial. Accordingly, the County Attorney's Office will cease fulfilling public records requests for materials in this case until such determination is made. While County Attorney Bill Montgomery fully respects the fundamental rights of a free press in our community, he is equally compelled to ensure a fair trial for Ms. Arias and any other defendant in similar circumstances. We'll follow up with you when we get a ruling and let you know what we’re able to release," Maricopa County Attorney's Office spokesman Jerry Cobb told HuffPost.

Martinez has been questioning LaViolette since Thursday, when the defense ended their direct examination of her. While testifying for the defense she said it was her opinion that Arias was physically and emotionally battered by Travis Alexander and feared for her life when she killed him.

LaViolette's finding challenges the prosecution's contention that Arias, 32, acted with premeditation when she killed Alexander.

The defense contends Arias, emotionally and physically battered and afraid for her life, killed in self-defense and did not plan to shoot Alexander in the head, stab him almost 30 times and cut his throat from ear to ear in his Mesa, Ariz., home in 2008.

For the prosecution, proving Arias' intent is key to sustaining the first-degree murder charge. Arias, jealous of Alexander's interest in other women, attacked him in the bathroom of his home after the couple spent the afternoon having sex, according to the prosecution.

During cross-examination Monday, Martinez repeatedly questioned LaViolette about her methods for determining Arias was a victim of domestic violence. He also pointed out Arias thinks she is as smart as Albert Einstein.

"So the fact that the defendant was happy to have her IQ tested because she believed she's on the level of Einstein, doesn't indicate to you this individual does not suffer from a low self-esteem issue?" Martinez asked.

"Most people who talk about how smart they are don't feel that they are that smart.... So, there could be a number of reasons why she was excited about that. I don't know, I wasn't there," LaViolette replied.

"The bottom line is you had it in your notes ... and, you're saying that, well, all these other people have these reasons why they want to know what their IQ is, you don't know why that's why the defendant wanted to know about her IQ right?" asked Martinez.

"No I don't," said LaViolette.

The trial is scheduled to resume at 12:30 p.m. Eastern time Tuesday, when Martinez will continue his redirect questioning of LaViolette.

MONDAY'S LIVE BLOG:

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The judge has called the evening recess. The trial will resume Tuesday, at 12:30 p.m. Eastern time.

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In her notes, LaViolette said Arias wanted a friend to print out copies of her "manifesto" in case she became famous.

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Martinez was again questioning LaViolette about the "manifesto" when the defense objected. The attorneys are now at a sidebar with the judge.

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Court is back in session.

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The judge has called a 3 minute recess.

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Martinez is questioning LaViolette about a "manifesto" Arias wrote in the event she would became famous. Martinez said Arias autographed copies of the manifesto while she was in jail in Yreka, California.

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Martinez pointed out that Arias took a test that shows her self-image is in the normal range. LaViolette said self-image is different that self-esteem. The defense objected to the line of questioning and the attorneys are now at another sidebar with the judge.

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The attorneys are at another sidebar with the judge.

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Martinez pointed out Arias was happy to have her IQ tested, because she believed she was as smart as Albert Einstein. Martinez asked LaViolette how, if Arias thought she is that smart, she could have low self-esteem. LaViolette said low self-esteem is based on things other than an IQ.

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"I look at lots of things because I take this case very seriously," LaViolette said.

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LaViolette has been evasive in her answers, prompting Martinez to call her out on it.

"You understand you are here to answer my questions, right?" Martinez asked.

"Yes," LaViolette replied.

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Martinez wanted to know if LaViolette had apologized to other clients and she said she could not remember.

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"Why is it ... you felt the need to coddle her -- by giving her books and apologizing?" Martinez asked.

"I felt that was a respectful way to talk to Ms. Arias ... I purchased the books ... because jail is boring," LaViolette replied.

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"Isn't it true that you bought some books for the defendant when she was in jail?" Martinez asked.

"Yes, It's true," LaViolette replied.

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LaViolette said she apologized to Arias for reading her journals when she first met her. Martinez asked her if she apologized because she had sympathy for Arias. LaViolette said she apologized because she had read private moments Arias had recorded.

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"Isn't it true that you are biased in favor of the defendant, yes or no?" Martinez asked.

"I don't believe I'm biased," LaViolette said.

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Court is back in Session.

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The judge has called recess. The live blog will continue when the trial resumes at 6:15 p.m. Eastern time.

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Martinez was again questioning the witness about Arias' cheating story when the defense objected. The attorneys are now at another sidebar with the judge.

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Martinez just showed the jury a text message from Alexander to Arias, in which he said he did not believe someone told her he was cheating on her.

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The attorneys are at another sidebar with the judge.

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LaViolette said she has seen evidence Alexander has a history of telling lies, more so than Arias.

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Martinez pointed out that on two separate occasions Arias claimed women came to her place of work to let her know her boyfriends were cheating.

"Doesn't it seem a little strange to you that in 50 percent of her relationships somebody comes up to her and tells her that her boyfriend is cheating?" Martinez asked.

LaViolette said she was only aware of that happening once and would need more information to formulate an opinion.

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The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge

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LaViolette is reviewing a document Martinez handed to her.

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The attorneys are at another sidebar with the judge.

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Martinez asked LaViolette if she was biased against Alexander. LaViolette denied she is and said Martinez is mischaracterizing her testimony.

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