The father of the Boston bombing suspects has announced plans to travel from Russia to the U.S.

NBC News' Adrienne Mong tweeted this quote from Anzor Tsarnaev.

"I am going to the US to bury my son. I don't want to blow up anyone. I want to see my younger son."

More from the Associated Press' Max Seddon:

MAKHACHKALA, Russia — The father of the two Boston bombing suspects says he is leaving Russia soon for the United States.

Anzor Tsarnaev told journalists in the southern Russian province of Dagestan on Thursday that he is leaving "today or tomorrow."

The suspects' mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, said she was still thinking it over. She was charged with shoplifting in the U.S. last summer and is concerned that she could be arrested.

Tsarnaeva said she had been assured by lawyers, however, that she would not be.

The Tsarnaev family emigrated to the U.S. a decade ago, but both parents returned to Russia last year.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

The Boston bombings should spur stronger security cooperation between Moscow and Washington, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday, adding that they also show that the West was wrong in supporting militants in Chechnya.

Putin said that "this tragedy should push us closer in fending off common threats, including terrorism, which is one of the biggest and most dangerous of them."

The two brothers accused of the Boston bombings are ethnic Chechens who had lived in the U.S. for more than a decade.

Putin warned against trying to find the roots for the Boston tragedy in the suffering endured by the Chechen people, particularly in mass deportations of Chechens to Siberia and Central Asia on Soviet dictator Josef Stalin's orders. "The cause isn't in their ethnicity or religion, it's in their extremist sentiments," he said.

Speaking in an annual call-in show on state television, Putin criticized the West for refusing to declare Chechen militants terrorists and for offering them political and financial assistance in the past.

"I always felt indignation when our Western partners and Western media were referring to terrorists who conducted brutal and bloody crimes on the territory of Russia as rebels," Putin said.

The U.S. has urged the Kremlin to seek a political settlement in Chechnya and criticized rights abuses by Russian troops during the two separatist wars since 1994, which spawned an Islamic insurgency that has engulfed the entire region.

It also provided humanitarian aid to the region during the high points of fighting there in the 1990s and the early 2000s.

Russian officials have repeatedly claimed that rebels in Chechnya have close links with al-Qaida. They say dozens of fighters from Arab countries trickled into the region during the fighting there, while some Chechen militants have gone to fight in Afghanistan.

Putin said the West should have cooperated more actively with Russia in combatting terror.

"We always have said that we shouldn't limit ourselves to declarations about terrorism being a common threat and engage in closer cooperation," he said. "Now these two criminals have proven the correctness of our thesis."


Related on HuffPost:

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  • Suspects 1 and 2

  • This frame grab from a video released by the FBI on Thursday, April 18, 2013, shows what the FBI are calling suspect number 1, front, in black cap, and suspect number 2, in white cap, back right, walking near each other through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • Suspects 1 and 2

  • Suspect 1

  • Suspect 1

  • Suspect 1

  • Suspect 2

  • This image from video released Thursday, April 19, 2013 by the FBI shows one of two suspects sought in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • Suspect 2

  • This combination of Associated Press file images released by the FBI on Thursday, April 18, 2013, show two images taken from surveillance video of what the FBI are calling suspect number 2, left, in white cap,and suspect number 1, right, in black cap, as they walk near each other through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI, File)

  • This frame grab from a video released by the FBI on Thursday, April 18, 2013, shows what the FBI are calling suspect number 1, black cap in lower right, walking in front of suspect number 2, not seen, through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • This frame grab from a video released by the FBI on Thursday, April 18, 2013, shows what the FBI are calling suspect number 1, black cap with backpack, walking in front of suspect number 2, white cap at lower right, through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • Suspect 2

  • This image from video released Thursday, April 18, 2013 by the FBI shows one of two suspects sought in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings. The FBI released photos and video of the two suspects and asked for the public's help in identifying them, zeroing in on the two men on surveillance-camera footage less than three days after the deadly attack. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • Suspect 2, Hand Next To Ear

  • This image from video released Thursday, April 18, 2013 by the FBI shows one of two suspects sought in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings. The FBI released photos and video of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing and asked for the public's help in identifying them, zeroing in on the two men on surveillance-camera footage less than three days after the deadly attack. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • Suspect 2

  • This image from video released Thursday, April 18, 2013 by the FBI shows one of two suspects sought in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings. The FBI released photos and video of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing and asked for the public's help in identifying them, zeroing in on the two men on surveillance-camera footage less than three days after the deadly attack. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • Boston Marathon Explosions

    This image provided by the Boston Regional Intelligence Center shows Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, one of the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. Authorities say Tsarnaev is still at large after he and another suspect — both identified to The Associated Press as coming from the Russian region near Chechnya — killed an MIT police officer, injured a transit officer in a firefight and threw explosive devices at police during their getaway attempt in a long night of violence into the early hours of Friday, April 19, 2013. The second suspect, who has not yet been identified, was killed in a shootout with police. (AP Photo/Boston Regional Intelligence Center)

  • This surveillance photo released via Twitter Friday, April 19, 2013 by the Boston Police Department shows a suspect entering a convenience store that police are pursuing in Watertown, Mass. Police say he is one of two suspects in the fatal shooting of an MIT police officer and tied to the Boston Marathon bombing. (AP Photo/Boston Police Department)

  • MIT SHOOTINGS 2

    Graphic shows photos of suspects; locates Watertown and Cambridge, Mass., where Boston Marathon bombing suspects exchanged gunfire and one is dead

  • This combo of photos released by the FBI early Friday April 19, 2013, shows what the FBI is calling suspects number 1, left, and suspect number 2, right, walking through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • This photo released by the FBI early Friday April 19, 2013, shows what the FBI is calling suspect number 1, walking through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • This photo released by the FBI early Friday April 19, 2013, shows what the FBI is calling suspect number 2, walking through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • This photo released by the FBI early Friday April 19, 2013, shows what the FBI is calling suspect number 2 behind a lady, walking through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • This photo released by the FBI early Friday April 19, 2013, shows what the FBI is calling the suspects together, walking through the crowd in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013, before the explosions at the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/FBI)

  • BOSTON MARATHON

    Graphic shows photos of the suspects and where they were caught on tape, a demographic profile of the runners and a map of the marathon path

  • Screen shot 2013-04-19 at 14

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev practices boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in April 2009 in Boston, Mass. These images show what is believed to be Boston bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in Boston, MA. The native Chechnya, dubbed Suspect 1 by the FBI, and has been reported as dead. He was described as a heavyweight fighter at the gym, and allegedly hoped to fight for the U.S., because his home nation was not recognised in the sporting world.

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev practices boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in April 2009 in Boston, Mass.

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev practices boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in April 2009 in Boston.

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev practices boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in April 2009 in Boston.

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev

    Tamerlan Tsarnaev practices boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in April 2009 in Boston.

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev practices boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in April 2009 in Boston.

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev practices boxing at the Wai Kru Mixed Martial Arts center in April 2009 in Boston.

  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev