Republicans would rather let their son or daughter keep a farm animal in his or her dorm room or break an ankle while running naked than host a sex ed class, according to the results of a recent 60 Minutes/Vanity Fair Poll.

The poll asked, "If you had a child in their first year of college, what is the last thing you would like to hear about him or her?" Overall, 25 percent of parents would shiver at news their darling was making fake IDs, and 24 percent said they'd most disapprove of their kid holding the record for consuming Jell-O shots.

Yet among Republicans, 28 percent identified hosting a sexual education class in their dorm twice a week as the worst possible scenario for their child, compared to just 10 percent of parents who preferred their child break an ankle while streaking, and 6 percent who chose "having a farm animal in their room."

By contrast, 30 percent of Democrats said setting a record for Jell-O shots was the least preferable, and 26 percent worried about hearing their child was making fake IDs. Eighteen percent of Dems said they'd hate to hear their kid was hosting a sex ed class.

If their child was offered their dream job during their third year of college, more parents would choose to tell their kid not to take the job, with 45 percent saying they'd recommend staying in school. Just 23 percent would say go ahead and take the job.

The poll also found that adults reported that, by and large, they wished they had made more of an effort in college themselves, and that the collegiate movie that most resembled their campus experience was "Good Will Hunting."

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • The Oldest Dorm

    The College of William & Mary was established in 1693, making it one of the oldest universities in America. <a href="http://www.wm.edu/about/history/historiccampus/wrenbuilding/index.php" target="_hplink">The Wren Building</a>, built between 1695 to 1700, was the first building to be constructed and housed the master and the president. The students did not live on campus until 1723, when Brafferton Hall dormitory was built. (Photo credit: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wren_1859_william_and_mary.jpg" target="_hplink">Wikimedia Commons</a>)

  • The Founding Fathers' Dorm

    According to legend, Founding Fathers John Adams, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Elbridge Gerry and James Otis were all residents of Harvard University's Massachusetts Hall. The building, which still survives today, was <a href="http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2011/10/the-newest-live-in-the-oldest/" target="_hplink">built in 1720</a> and was designed to house the growing student population. Today the president's office is located on the first floor, while the fourth floor houses freshmen.

  • First Women's Dorms

    Historically, universities in America were separated by gender. Women's colleges were created to educate women. Wellesley College, which boosts of alumnae such as Madeleine Albright and Hillary Clinton, is just one example.

  • African American Dorms

    Similar to women, African Americans were forced into separate living quarters in colleges. One example is Penn State, which had an unofficial housing policy until 1946 banning African Americans from living in white students' dorms. The university actually created a specific dorm for those few African American students called <a href="http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archive/2012/04/23/ceremony_honors_first_black_dorm_on_campus.aspx" target="_hplink">Lincoln Hall.</a> From the 1930s until the 1950s, the dorm housed about eight black male students.

  • Hippie Dorms

    The 70s saw a new wave of dormitory architecture. These unfortunate dorms, which are still widely used today, are identifiable by their cinderblock wall interior and harsh exteriors. (Photo credit: ISU Housing)

  • Greek Life Dorms

    Greek life has existed on college campuses since <a href="http://www.elon.edu/e-web/students/greek_life/glhistory.xhtml" target="_hplink">1750s</a>, and the sorority and fraternity houses often provided alternative dorm options for the members. This living situation is known to have some drawbacks though, as greek life has a reputation for revelry.

  • Standard Dorm

    Though dorms have advanced -- they are co-ed and integrated -- most college freshmen still live in a double shared with a person of the same gender. While the rooms are often not impressive, students experience more perks as they gain seniority, such as suites or apartments.

  • Luxury Dorms

    Today some dorms have become so luxurious that they resemble high-tech hotel rooms. Unsurprisingly, MIT is included on that list.

  • Luxury Dorms

    Scripps College takes advantage of its sunny California location, giving its all-female student body fairy tale dorms. The college is listed on <a href="http://www.forbes.com/2010/03/01/most-beautiful-campus-lifestyle-college.html" target="_hplink">Forbes</a> as one of the most beautiful campuses.

  • Luxury Dorms

    Though there are many competitors, the University of California Irvine might win for most luxurious dorms. The Vista Del Campo dorm even advertises a <a href="http://www.housing.uci.edu/photo/album.asp?album=39" target="_hplink">"resort style swimming pool, jacuzzi, movie theater, game room, fitness center, and computer lab.</a>" (Photo credit: UC Irvine Housing)