theladders names

While longer names may sound more sophisticated, shorter first names are the ones that lead to a bigger paycheck, according to a new study that compared name length and salary size.

For every extra letter in a name, there was a $3,600 drop in salary on average, according research just released by TheLadders.com, an online job-matching service. The company looked at the first names of nearly 6 million people in its database and found a correlation between length of name and compensation.

The findings were true for nicknames as well. The study looked at 24 sets of names and nicknames, such as Stephen/Steve or William/Bill, and found that people who used the shortened version of their names tended to make more money.

Researchers at TheLadders suggested that a higher level of seniority could correlate with a wider use of nicknames. However, there could be other implicit social factors that are behind the trend. Previous research has shown that names that are unique, or more uncommon, tend to have a harder time in the job marketplace and get fewer callbacks from employers. A widely cited study discussed in the 2005 book Freakonomics, showed that people with distinctively African-American names are more likely to live in a neighborhood with higher poverty and lower income.

Other research has show that names are also associated with gender stereotypes. A 2000 study showed that people tend to subconsciously predict career success for those with names that more closely match the gender stereotype associated with that profession.

Regardless of the length or spelling of the name, TheLadder's job search expert Amanda Augustine said the most important thing is to keep the name the same everywhere it appears. "Make it consistent across every business channel, including your professional online profiles, resume, business cards, and email signature," she said in a statement release with the study results.

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    <strong>Median income:</strong> $39,410 <strong>Bottom-tier income:</strong> $24,640 <strong>Number employed:</strong> 20,830 <strong>Percentage with at least a bachelor's degree:</strong> 71 percent <strong>Projected change in jobs (2008 - 2018):</strong> +15 percent Recreational therapists work with sick or disabled individuals to help reduce depression and "maintain the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their clients," according to the BLS. Most recreational therapists have at least a bachelor's degree, and 15% have a master's degree. The number of positions available is expected to increase by 15% between 2008 and 2018 as the elderly population, one of the largest group of clients, grows. The median wage for a recreational therapist is just $39,410 per year, and the bottom 10% make less than $25,000 per year. <a href="http://247wallst.com/2011/11/15/the-seven-jobs-that-require-the-most-education-but-pay-the-least/#ixzz1dszgbo00" target="_hplink">Read more at 24/7 Wall St. </a>

  • 6. Biological Technicians

    <strong>Median income:</strong> $39,020 <strong>Bottom-tier income:</strong> $24,930 <strong>Number employed:</strong> 72,940 <strong>Percentage with at least a bachelor's degree:</strong> 83 percent <strong>Projected change in jobs (2008 - 2018):</strong> +18 percent Biological technicians, the BLS explains, "work with biologists studying living organisms. Many assist scientists who conduct medical research-helping to find a cure for cancer or AIDS, for example." Despite the important work, the median wage for a technician in the field is just $39,020 per year. About 83% of the people working in this field have a bachelor's degree. The number of biological technicians is projected to grow by 18% from 2008 numbers by 2018. <a href="http://247wallst.com/2011/11/15/the-seven-jobs-that-require-the-most-education-but-pay-the-least/#ixzz1dszgbo00" target="_hplink">Read more at 24/7 Wall St. </a>

  • 5. Mental Health And Substance Abuse Social Workers

    <strong>Median income:</strong> $38,600 <strong>Bottom-tier income:</strong> $25,210 <strong>Number employed:</strong> 119,960 <strong>Percentage with at least a bachelor's degree:</strong> 98 percent <strong>Projected change in jobs (2008 - 2018):</strong> +20 percent There are several lucrative positions in the field of mental health. The median income for psychiatrists, for example, is around $165,000 a year. At the other end of the spectrum are mental health and substance abuse workers. These individuals work with the sick, the depressed and the addicted to help restore health and well-being. Despite the often stressful conditions under which these specialists work, as well as the fact that one in four has a master's or doctorate, the median annual wage for this position is just $38,600. The bottom 10% makes $25,210 or less each year. <a href="http://247wallst.com/2011/11/15/the-seven-jobs-that-require-the-most-education-but-pay-the-least/#ixzz1dszgbo00" target="_hplink">Read more at 24/7 Wall St. </a>

  • 4. Museum Technicians And Conservators

    <strong>Median income:</strong> $37,310 <strong>Bottom-tier income:</strong> $24,440 <strong>Number employed:</strong> 10,390 <strong>Percentage with at least a bachelor's degree:</strong> 80 percent <strong>Projected change in jobs (2008 - 2018):</strong> 26 percent Museum conservators employ advanced technology to maintain the quality of the artwork and artifacts on display and in storage. Success in this position requires proficiency using different laboratory techniques, such as x-ray, to determine the best way to treat a piece. Some can get the job with just a bachelor's degree, but most museums look for a least a master's in the study of conservation. The median income for museum conservators is $37,310 per year, and the bottom tier makes less than $25,000. <a href="http://247wallst.com/2011/11/15/the-seven-jobs-that-require-the-most-education-but-pay-the-least/#ixzz1dszgbo00" target="_hplink">Read more at 24/7 Wall St. </a>

  • 3. Medical And Clinical Laboratory Technicians

    <strong>Median income:</strong> $36,280 <strong>Bottom-tier income:</strong> $24,210 <strong>Number employed:</strong> 156,480 <strong>Percentage with at least a bachelor's degree:</strong> 71 percent <strong>Projected change in jobs (2008 - 2018):</strong> +12 percent According to the BLS, "laboratory testing plays a crucial role in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease ... medical technicians or medical laboratory technicians, perform most of these tests." Because of increased use of computers in lab analysis, technicians are required to be proficient in digital analysis rather than hands-on testing. Most technologists need to have at least a bachelor's degree in a medical field, with 11% having a master's degree. The median income for these positions is just $36,280, and the lowest tier makes less than $25,000 each year. <a href="http://247wallst.com/2011/11/15/the-seven-jobs-that-require-the-most-education-but-pay-the-least/#ixzz1dszgbo00" target="_hplink">Read more at 24/7 Wall St. </a>

  • 2. Survey Researchers

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  • 1. Reporters and Correspondents

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