Ever feel like you're just stuck between a rock and a hard place? Well these people actually are.

Although, not really stuck.

They willingly hiked the 984 meters (over 3200 ft.) up Kjerag mountain in Rogaland, Norway and sought out the Kjeragbolten.

The Kjeragbolten is a massive boulder wedged in the crevice of this Norwegian mountain. It has become a popular tourist attraction for its beauty and wonder and because it's a prime location for BASE jumping. Which, for those of you who don't know, is the art of jumping off incredibly high places, using a parachute to soften your landing.

To see what that free-fall feeling is like without having to actually jump, watch the video above and check out the photos of the incredible wonder below.

kjerag


kjerag


kjerag

Related on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Marble Caves, Chile

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-natural-wonders/9">See More of the World's Strangest Natural Wonders</a><br><br> Six thousand years of wave erosion created the undulating patterns that give these caves their marbleized effect, enhanced by the reflection of the blue and green water of Carrera Lake, near Chile’s border with Argentina. Although the area is threatened by a plan to build a dam nearby, for now, visitors can kayak throughout the caves on days when the waters are calm.<br><br> <em>Photo: <a href="http://www.flickriver.com/photos/38235519@N05/popular-interesting/" target="_hplink">Robert O'Duill</a></em>

  • Lake Retba, Senegal

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-natural-wonders/9">See More of the World's Strangest Natural Wonders</a><br><br> It looks as if someone poured a giant bottle of Pepto-Bismol into Lake Retba -- that's how deeply pink these waters are. The color is actually caused by a particular kind of algae called Dunaliella salina that produces a pigment. The salt content is extremely high, reaching 40 percent in some spots and allowing the algae to thrive (and swimmers to float effortlessly on the surface of the 10-foot-deep lake). Blinding white piles of salt line the shores, and locals work several hours a day harvesting salt from the bright pink water.<br><br> <em>Photo: <a href="http://martinezcodinaphoto.net/" target="_hplink">Martinez Codina</a></em>

  • Asbyrgi Canyon, Iceland

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-natural-wonders/9">See More of the World's Strangest Natural Wonders</a><br><br> Legend has it that the Asbyrgi Canyon in northern Iceland was created when the hoof of a Norse god’s horse touched the earth, slicing through 300-foot-tall cliffs and flattening an area just over two miles long and more than a half mile wide. The likelier scientific explanation is that two periods of glacial flooding carved the canyon between 3,000 and 10,000 years ago. But standing atop the cliffs, with the green carpet of the horseshoe-shaped canyon spread before you, it’s fun to imagine otherwise.<br><br> <em>Photo: Arctic-Images/Corbis</em>

  • Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-natural-wonders/9">See More of the World's Strangest Natural Wonders</a><br><br> When a prehistoric lake dried up about 30,000 years ago, it left an endless expanse of white hexagonal tiles that stretch to the horizon. Welcome to the world's largest salt flat, stretching for 4,000 square miles -- 25 times the size of Utah's Bonneville Salt Flats. The site provides more than 25,000 tons of salt per year to local miners, supports a thriving community of thousands of flamingos, and attracts tourists who can check into the <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-most-unusual-hotels/6" target="_hplink">Palacio de Sal</a>, a 16-room hotel made entirely from salt blocks.<br><br> <em>Photo: <a href="http://miradas.com.br/" target="_hplink">Danielle Pereira/miradas.com.br</a></em>

  • Travertine Pools at Pamukkale, Turkey

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-natural-wonders/9">See More of the World's Strangest Natural Wonders</a><br><br> People have sought the reputed healing effects of bathing here for thousands of years. The water that flows from 17 subterranean hot springs into the pools has an extremely high concentration of calcium carbonate, which forms soft deposits when it hits the surface. Those viscous white deposits harden over time until the springs resemble a fountain made of chalk or, as indicated by the poetic translation of Pamukkale, a “cotton castle” visible from more than 10 miles away.<br><br> <em>Photo: danfay1009</em>

  • Sailing Stones, Racetrack Playa, Death Valley, CA

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-natural-wonders/9">See More of the World's Strangest Natural Wonders</a><br><br> No one has ever seen one of the “sailing stones” on Death Valley’s Racetrack Playa move, but evidence of their travels is visible in the long track marks that trail behind them in the dusty ground. Scientists aren’t sure exactly how the rocks—which can weigh hundreds of pounds—make their way across the dry lake bed. The prevailing theory is that when the rocks are wet or icy, they’re pushed along the flat playa by strong winds. The deep groove marks they leave behind indicate they may travel up to 700 feet from their point of origin.<br><br> <em>Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/fitzharris/5586341101/" target="_hplink">Brian Fitzharris</a></em>

  • White Desert (Sahara el Beyda), Egypt

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-natural-wonders/9">See More of the World's Strangest Natural Wonders</a><br><br> Bulbous white rocks in strange shapes and sizes rise from the desert about 28 miles north of the town of Farafra in western Egypt -- a cluster of mushrooms here, a herd of half-melted snowmen over there. Their appearance isn't due to some avant-garde stone sculptor, but rather thanks to the wind. When the ancient sea that once covered the land dried up, the remaining sediment layer began to break down. The softer spots crumbled away, and over time, powerful sandstorms shaped the harder rocks into their current forms.<br><br> <em>Photo: <a href="http://VascoPlanet.com" target="_hplink">VascoPlanet.com</a></em>