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Graduation Speeches: 8 Quotes From Notable High School Grad Speakers (VIDEO)

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HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION
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While colleges may be more well-known for attracting famous closing speakers, a few high schools have hosted notable speakers for their graduation ceremonies -- and, lucky for us, recorded the special events. From First Lady Michelle Obama to local English teachers to the President himself, scroll down for eight words of wisdom from amazing high school grad speakers. You can watch their full speeches in the accompanying videos.

1. President Obama: “Some of life’s strongest bonds are the ones we forge when everything around us seems broken... We are stronger together than we are alone.”

2. Michelle Obama: "You're proving that it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks about you or what you can achieve, the only thing that matters, graduates, is what you think about yourself."

3. Rachel Maddow: “After we graduate tonight, we no longer have to let society happen to us. We get to create our own.”

4. Joe Biden: “Think big and imagine... Meeting challenges head-on has been the story of the history of the journey of America.”

5. Drake: "There are many different ways of following through... Sometimes it’s about going there, not getting there. Sometimes it’s the journey that teaches you a lot about your destination.”

6. Oprah: "Follow your instincts. When you do what you know is the right thing, you will always turn out okay... and the truth is, you always know what the right thing is to do. Make the right decision even when nobody's looking, especially when nobody's looking, and you will always turn out okay."

7. David McCullough: “By definition there can be only one best. You’re it or you’re not.”

8. Arianna Huffington: "Don’t wait for leaders on a white horse to save us. Instead, turn to the leader in the mirror. Tap into your own leadership potential."

arianna huffington
(source: Getty Images)

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