Thousands of people in Moore, Okla., who lost their homes to a powerful tornado that killed 24 people are all now haunted by the same question: How do I begin to rebuild a life from the rubble that might resemble the one I had?

"It's a long process, getting your life back together," said Don Staley, who has lived in the Moore area since 1964, attended Plaza Towers Elementary as a child and lost two houses to tornadoes in the last 15 years. "When you don’t pass away in the storm, you start putting all these pieces back together like a puzzle."

The tornado, more than a mile wide, that swept through central Oklahoma earlier this week is estimated to have caused $2 billion in damages and affected as many as 13,000 homes. Those who lost their houses to tornadoes similar to the one that devastated Moore say the path back to normalcy can take months, even years.

Staley was living in Moore in 1999 when an F5-level storm took out 8,000 houses, including his.

"You come out of the house and you're distraught. You're numb for about two or three days," Staley said. "After about a week or two, you start to get your senses back to where you can start talking to people. It takes about that long for you to get an appointment with your insurance company because there are so many people that are affected."

When the 1999 storm hit, Staley sought refuge in the single bathroom of the three-bedroom house he owned. The storm tore through, blew off the roof and caused the walls to cave in. A home repairman by trade, Staley asked a client if he and his wife could rent one of the houses he had been working on. About a year later, with the insurance money he'd collected, he bought a house eight blocks from the one that was destroyed.

But in 2003, another tornado hit and things went much the same. The roof flew off. The walls caved in. Once they'd collected the insurance money after that storm, the Staleys bought a house in the country several miles south of Moore. This week’s storm missed them by five miles.

Storm veterans like the Staleys, who live in a region of the United States so prone to violent weather it's known as "tornado alley" adopt techniques over time to prepare themselves for the sudden disruption thrust upon their lives. Staley said you learn to take pictures or video of your belongings for insurance companies seeking an itemized lists of losses. Storing paperwork in a safety deposit box at the bank -- car titles, birth certificates, passports -- also mitigates losses.

Of course, thinking ahead about insurance claims doesn’t solve the most urgent need at hand: shelter, after losing everything.

Kelly Webb, a property manager who works in Moore, said he received phone calls nonstop from noon through midnight the day after the storm hit. Hundreds of people this week inquired about renting one of the 17 houses he had available. Some had to walk to a nearby DMV office to get their fingerprints taken as proof of their identity so they could get new identification and a credit check to rent one of the properties.

Webb's company, Rent King, has another 10 houses that are supposed to be vacated on June 1. "We've been contacting those tenants to turn their keys in earlier, giving them a rent credit and getting the properties ready so we can place some of these people," Webb said.

It is, of course, a temporary solution. Eventually, homeowners will be forced to decide whether to try and rebuild on their existing lots, or to move into another house.

Sarah Jo Radcliffe, secretary of Peace Lutheran Church in Joplin, Mo., said most of the people she knows who lost their homes in the 2011 tornado there collected insurance money and bought new homes rather trying to rebuild.

"For some people, it was just easier to move into something new and start over right away," said Radcliffe.

Although one family, she recalled, bought a house after losing theirs then turned around and sold it; they wanted to rebuild on their old lot because the new one just didn't feel like home. The church, also a casualty of the storm, just held its first service Sunday at its new location, almost exactly two years after the storm.

Rita Sloan, 75, a member of the church, was 10 days away from signing papers to sell her house and purchase a smaller, more manageable one when the tornado hit Joplin. Neither property survived.

Sloan, too, recalled a kind of numbness that took over and lasted for days after the storm had passed. When the tornado hit her house, she huddled with her Jack Russell, Zoe, in a hallway between two cedar closets -- it was the place her husband who had died just three months earlier had always told her was the safest.

Sloan can't remember how long it she was there, but eventually she heard people calling her name. Her granddaughter apologized for not getting there faster, confessing that while running in flip-flops over to the house, she was so scared she had to stop and throw up.

Sloan moved in with her daughter for a week, then rented an apartment for six weeks after that. Two months after the storm, she was able to buy a new house. The hardest part, she said, was going through the trauma without her husband of 52 years.

"I had some of what they call meltdown days," she said. "You feel a big loss. And still to this day there's stuff that I miss. At times, you think, 'I have that' and then you go to look for it and you think, 'no, I don’t have that anymore.'"

People who have lost everything to tornadoes, though, say that their perspective on material things changes over time.

"You learn that it's just things, most of them. You can't spend all your life thinking about what you lost," said Kathrin Elmborg, who also lost her house in the Joplin storm.

Elmborg, 84, said she would have been killed if she hadn't gone to close the back door near the kitchen right when the storm hit. The way the kitchen cabinets and the refrigerator happened to lean ended up creating a pocket of shelter from the debris. The rest of the house, she said, blew away.

Elmborg stayed with family friends in the country for several weeks before she bought a new house because there were no hotels with vacancies nearby. The insurance money came through quickly, though. Because Elmborg's granddaughter and her husband lost their house, too, the whole family moved in together and remain in that house.

Despite the loss that surrounds them, residents of Moore can look forward to seeing a better side of people than perhaps they ever have before, said Elmborg.

"We had so many boxes of clothing and towels and toilet items from people we didn’t even know," she said. "It was just amazing the generosity of people."

Now that this storm has torn through another community, Elmborg said it’s their turn to give.

"We're going to see what we can come up with to send down there," she said. "Because we're trying to pass it forward."

Arthur Delaney contributed reporting to this story.

Loading Slideshow...
  • Moore Residents Begin Painful Recovery From Massive Tornado Strike

    MOORE, OK - MAY 24: Larry Cory displays an American flag outside the funeral for nine-year-old tornado victim Nicholas McCabe on May 24, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. A two-mile wide EF5 tornado touched down in Moore May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

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    Carol Kawaykla stands in the rubbles of her tornado devastated home in Moore, Oklahoma, on May 24, 2013. The tornado, one of the most powerful in recent years, killed 24 people, injured 377, damaged or destroyed 1,200 homes and affected an estimated 33,000 people in this Oklahoma City suburb, officials said in their latest update. Initial damages have been estimated at around $2 billion. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Moore Residents Continue Painful Recovery From Massive Tornado Strike

    MOORE, OK - MAY 24: Sabrina Mitchell recovers a stuffed doll as she searches for belongings in what was the second floor bedroom of her home which was destroyed by a tornado on May 24, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. A two-mile wide EF5 tornado touched down in Moore May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-TORNADO

    Lightning strikes during a thunder storm as tornado survivors search for salvagable stuffs at their devastated home on May 23, 2013, in Moore, Oklahoma. Severe thunderstorms barreled through this Oklahoma City suburb at dawn Thursday, complicating clean-up efforts three days after a powerful tornado killed 24 people and destroyed 2,400 homes. More rain was forecast to fall on Moore, soaking the disaster zone where residents had just the day before, under clear blue skies, started picking through the rubble of their destroyed houses to recover personal effects. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Claudia Clark clears tornado debris from a cemetery Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Okla. Cleanup continues two days after a huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

  • US-WEATHER-TORNADO

    A tornado-devastated neighborhood is seen during a thunder storm on May 23, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Severe thunderstorms barreled through this Oklahoma City suburb at dawn Thursday, complicating clean-up efforts three days after a powerful tornado killed 24 people and destroyed 2,400 homes. More rain was forecast to fall on Moore, soaking the disaster zone where residents had just the day before, under clear blue skies, started picking through the rubble of their destroyed houses to recover personal effects. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-TORNADO

    A cross stands over a destroyed home as the sun rises on May 23, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. A powerful tornado classified as an EF4 passed through the town May 20, destroying homes, schools and businesses and killing 24 people including children. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon Monday, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. AFP PHOTO/Joshua LOTT (Photo credit should read Joshua LOTT/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Powerful Tornado Rips Through Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 22: Linda Deason collects a picture of her daughter Tracy Stephan, and granddaughter, Abigail Stephan (2 mos. in photo) from her tornado destroyed home on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Ok. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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    An unidentified woman looks over the scene as residents sort through their tornado-ravaged homes Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Okla. Cleanup continues two days after a huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (Charlie Riedel / AP)

  • Oklahoma City Thunder NBA basketball player Kevin Durant walks past tornado-damaged homes in a neighborhood in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, May 22, 2013. Durant donated $1 million to the American Red Cross for relief efforts. The Thunder matched the $1 million donation. At left is one of his friends, Randy Williams. (Sue Ogrocki / AP)

  • Christine Jones (L) is comforted by her daughter Ashley as they stand in front of Christine's home which was destroyed when a tornado ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Scott Olson / Getty Images)

  • Casey Angle, a student at Plaza Towers Elementary School poses for a portrait outside her destroyed home as she holds a family photo that includes her sister Sydney Angle, second from left, on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Casey's sister Sydney Angle was killed when a powerful tornado classified as an EF4 destroyed Plaza Towers Elementary School, which also ripped through the town Monday destroying homes, schools and businesses, killing several people including children. (Joshua Lott / AFP / Getty Images)

  • Don Jackson shows his wife's wedding ring after he found it in the rubble of his home that was destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Scott Olson / Getty Images)

  • A Dallas Cowboys doll sits on top of a car in the rubble of the tornado May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The two-mile-wide Category 5 tornado touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Brett Deering / Getty Images)

  • Brittany Brown rushes to get aid after finding her grandmother's cat "Kitty" which was buried in tornado rubble for two days at the grandmother's destroyed home Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Okla. Cleanup continues two days after a huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (Charlie Riedel / AP)

  • Nick Balen holds his daughter Kinley while visiting the destroyed doctor's office where his wife worked and survived Monday's tornado, along with 13 other people, Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Okla. Cleanup continues two days after a huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

  • Marvin Dixon, the grandfather of 8-year-old tornado victim Kyle Davis, glances down at a photo of his grandson while sitting for a portrait in the lobby of a funeral home where his grandson awaits burial, in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, May 22, 2013. Nicknamed "The Wall," Davis loved soccer and going to the Monster Truck exhibitions at the fairgrounds with his grandfather. Kyle was killed Monday, May 20, 2013, when a huge tornado roared through Moore, Okla., flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying his elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds up to 200 mph. (Brennan Linsley / AP)

  • Downed power lines are shown in the backyard of Leslie Paul's home as she is helped by friends recover items Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Oklahoma. (Tony Gutierrez / AP)

  • James Pitts uses a sledge hammer to try to force open a friend's trunk in a tornado-ravaged car as residents sort through their tornado-ravaged homes Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Okla. Cleanup continues two days after a huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

  • Rick Brown puts on a pair of boots after finding them in his tornado-ravaged home Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Okla. Cleanup continues two days after a huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

  • Susan Kates salvages items from a friend's tornado-ravaged home Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Okla. Cleanup continues two days after a huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

  • Chad Allcox, left, helps his friend Kevin McElvany, right, the home owner, clear debris away from his destroyed home from Monday's tornado Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in Moore, Oklahoma. (Tony Gutierrez / AP)

  • US-WEATHER-TORNADO

    Road signs and other debris left by the May 20 tornado are seen on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 22: Eric Lowery looks over damage to his mother's vehicle after it was blown from her workplace and came to rest on debris of a collapsed building nearby after a tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF5 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-TORNADO

    A man pulling a child's wagon returns to his tornado devastated home on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 22: Workers remove a damaged neon letter from the marquee in front of the Warren Theater after a tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF5 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • At sunrise, police patrol a partially-destroyed row of houses adjacent to a group of homes completely leveled on Monday when a tornado moved through Moore, Okla., Wednesday, May 22, 2013. The huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb, flattening a wide swath of homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • A brick mailbox lies flattened in front of what used to be Dan and Rebecca Garland's home in Moore, Okla., on Tuesday, May 21, 2013. Nearly a dozen neighbors and relatives took refuge in the family's storm shelter during Monday's deadly EF5 tornado. (AP Photo/Allen Breed)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of the Moore Medical Center destroyed after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • This Tuesday, May 21, 2013 aerial photo shows, from bottom to top, the path Monday's tornado took through Moore, Okla. The huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (AP Photo/Kim Johnson Flodin)

  • A home in Moore, Okla. sits severely damaged Tuesday, May 21, 2013, after Monday's massive tornado moved through the area. The huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

  • CORRECTS NAME OF SCHOOL TO PLAZA TOWERS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - An aerial view of Plaza Towers Elementary School that was damaged in Monday's tornado Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Moore, Oklahoma. A huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening an entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

  • A man who asked not to be identified hangs an American flag on what is left of a tree in a neighborhood north of SW 149th between Western and Santa Fe on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, after a tornado struck south Oklahoma City and Moore, Okla., on Monday. (AP Photo/The Oklahoman, Nate Billing)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of destroyed houses and buildings after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of the destroyed Plaza Tower elementary school after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of destroyed houses and buildings after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of destroyed houses after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of destroyed houses and buildings after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-TORNADO

    Men walk at their backyard of their tornado devastated neighbourhood on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Families returned to a blasted moonscape that had been an American suburb Tuesday after a monstrous tornado tore through the outskirts of Oklahoma City, killing at least 24 people. Nine children were among the dead and entire neighborhoods vanished, with often the foundations being the only thing left of what used to be houses and cars tossed like toys and heaped in big piles. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-TORNADO

    A woman salvages memorable from her tornado devastated home on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Families returned to a blasted moonscape that had been an American suburb Tuesday after a monstrous tornado tore through the outskirts of Oklahoma City, killing at least 24 people. Nine children were among the dead and entire neighborhoods vanished, with often the foundations being the only thing left of what used to be houses and cars tossed like toys and heaped in big piles. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: Amber Johnson (R) a fifth grade teacher at Briarwood Elementary School salvages items from her which was parked at the school when a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Johnson is being helped by her daughters Natalie (L) and Nicole. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: Chris Combs and her husband Jimmy look over damge at Briarwood Elementary School after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Chris is a secretary at the school and was inside the school office when the tornado hit. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: Macie Thompson looks over damage at Briarwood Elementary School after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: A pickup truck is wrapped around a tree after a powerful tornado ripped through the neighborhood on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of destroyed houses and buildings after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of destroyed houses and buildings after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of a destroyed house after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • Massive Tornado Causes Large Swath Of Destruction In Suburban Moore, Oklahoma

    MOORE, OK - MAY 21: An aerial view of destroyed houses and buildings after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Benjamin Krain/Getty Images)

  • A man salvages stuff from what left of a bedroom of his tornado devastated home on May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Families returned to a blasted moonscape that had been an American suburb Tuesday after a monstrous tornado tore through the outskirts of Oklahoma City, killing at least 24 people. Nine children were among the dead and entire neighborhoods vanished, with often the foundations being the only thing left of what used to be houses and cars tossed like toys and heaped in big piles. (Jewel Samad / AFP / Getty Images)

  • Heath Thayer, left, and his brother Derek Thayer look at Derek's tornado-ravaged pickup truck which was thrown across the street from where it was parked Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Moore, Okla. A huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Charlie Riedel / AP)

  • Zac Woodcock salvages items from the rubble of a tornado-ravaged rental home which they own Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Moore, Okla. A huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening an entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Charlie Riedel / AP)

Loading Slideshow...
  • Birth Of The May 20, 2013 Tornado In Newcastle, Okla.

  • Incredible Oklahoma Tornado

  • Rozel, Kansas

  • Shawnee, Oklahoma

  • Viola, Kansas

  • Carney, Oklahoma

  • Edmond, Oklahoma

  • Moore, Oklahoma

  • Wellston, Oklahoma

  • Edmond, Oklahoma

  • Massive Tornado Levels Oklahoma City Suburb

    A day after tornadoes began sweeping the midwest, an Oklahoma city suburb has been hit by a massive tornado. This story will be updated.

  • Footage Shows Aftermath Of Oklahoma Tornado

    At least one tornado touched down near Oklahoma City on Monday, only one day after a tornado killed two in Shawnee.

  • Elementary School Destroyed By Tornado In Oklahoma

    Elementary School Destroyed By Tornado In Oklahoma

  • Heavy Tornado Damage in Shawnee, Oklahoma

    A tornado that hit Oklahoma late Sunday did heavy damage to the town of Shawnee. Reports of injuries could not immediately be confirmed. (May 19)

  • Raw: Tornado on the Ground in Oklahoma

    The day after tornadoes killed two people in Oklahoma, a new tornado was spotted on the ground in Newcastle. (May 20)

  • Raw: Aftermath of Massive Tornado in Oklahoma

    A mile-wide tornado churned through the Oklahoma City suburbs, destroying homes for the second day in a row Monday, as part of a severe weather outbreak that was expected to spread to other parts of the Plains and Midwest. (May 20)

  • Raw: House Burns After Massive Oklahoma Tornado

    Television footage shows flattened buildings and at least one fire after a mile-wide tornado tore through the Oklahoma City area. Video shows homes and buildings in Moore, Okla. reduced to rubble and vehicles littered roadways. (May 20)