STYLE

Asos Radioactive Belts Scare Causes Company To Pull Entire Batch: REPORT

05/28/2013 10:33 am ET
Asos

Fashion retailer Asos has pulled an entire batch of belts found to be radioactive, according to a new report obtained by The Guardian.

Entitled Project Purple Flower, the internal document states that the metal studded belts tested positive for Cobalt-60, a cancer-causing chemical, and could be harmful if worn for over 500 hours. None of the 641 belts are "suitable for public use or possession," according to the report.

The e-commerce site instituted a worldwide recall of the brass and leather belts after US border patrol found that they were radioactive. "Unfortunately, this incident is quite a common occurrence," the report states, citing manufacturing company Haq International as the supplier of the contaminated belts. As expected, the belt in question (see a photo here) has also been pulled from the site completely.

According to Asos, no other products have been affected by the radioactive scare. The retailer is certainly not the first brand to face a recall scandal, though. Lululemon dealt with a batch of see-through leggings that had to be pulled this year, while baby clothing manufacturer Carter's had to recall a line of onesies that presented a choking hazard around the same time.

And chemicals aren't too separate from the style world either. In its recent report "Toxic Threads: The Big Fashion Stitch-Up," Greenpeace found quite a few toxic materials in garments from "fast-fashion" retailers, including Zara, Mango and H&M. On the beauty end, L'Oreal has been plagued by FDA accusations that its lipsticks contain a high lead content. Yikes.

With all of these fashion frenzies, it seems that it's worthwhile to keep abreast of the scare du jour. Does this make you think twice about buying inexpensive gear?

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