Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) is already predicting doom in 2016 for Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) in the influential Republican caucuses in Iowa, where he said the senator will likely lose based on his immigration reform bill.

"Rubio seems to be so damaged it will be very difficult for him to recover here in Iowa," King told the Washington Examiner's Byron York. "My perspective is that the immigration issue will sort Republican candidates."

King is a staunch opponent of immigration reform that legalizes undocumented immigrants, a major part of the bipartisan gang of eight bill Rubio helped draft. Rubio has been pitching the bill, which also increases interior and border enforcement, as necessary to both the party and the nation as a whole.

Rubio has also faced opposition to the bill from tea party leaders and influencers such as former Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.), conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, pundit Erick Erickson and radio hosts Laura Ingraham and Mark Levin.

He appeared on Sean Hannity's Fox News show last Friday to pitch the immigration reform legislation to conservative viewers.

The Florida senator hasn't said whether he plans to run for president in 2016, but many signs point to him joining the race. He's already visited Iowa, which will be among the first in 2016 to make its pick for the Republican presidential nominee.

Other potential candidates may also support the gang of eight immigration reform bill. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who like Rubio has remained quiet on whether he plans to run, said Sunday on ABC's "This Week" that he wants to support the bill, and might if the amendments he supports are adopted.

(h/t TPM)

Also on HuffPost:

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  • Reform Would Help Curb The Deficit

    Immigration reform would <a href="http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-04-08/business/38371503_1_previous-immigration-bills-immigration-reform-immigration-laws" target="_blank">reduce the federal deficit by $2.5 trillion</a> over the next 10 years, according to an April analysis by the American Action Forum, a conservative think tank.

  • Expelling Immigrants Is Expensive

    Expelling the approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants currently in the United States would cost $2.6 trillion over the next 10 years, <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/id/100449802" target="_blank">according to CNBC</a>. That's because it costs the government more than $8,000 to deport each person.

  • Reform Would Help Fix The Social Security Problem

    Immigration reform would help bolster Social Security because more legal workers would mean more people contributing payroll taxes to its trust fund, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130508/us-immigration/?utm_hp_ref=arts&ir=arts" target="_blank">according to an analysis from the Social Security administration</a>. Undocumented workers <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/18/immigration-reform-social-security_n_3103500.html" target="_blank">already contribute $15 billion per year</a> to Social Security.

  • Immigrants Start Successful Businesses

    More than <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/31/worried-about-the-economy-then-pass-immigration-reform/" target="_blank">a quarter of technology and engineering firms</a> started between 1995 and 2005 had a foreign-born owner, according to the Washington Post. One <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/22/american-companies-founded-by-immigrants_n_3116172.html#slide=2357880" target="_blank">of the founders of Yahoo!</a>, Jerry Yang, is an immigrant from Taiwan.

  • Reform Would Save $410 Billion Over The Next 10 Years

    The immigration reform bill proposed by the "gang of eight" senators would save <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/15/immigration-reform-save-billions_n_3280145.html?utm_hp_ref=business" target="_blank"> $410 billion over the next decade</a>, according to an analysis from Gordon Gray, the director of fiscal policy at the American Action Forum, a conservative think tank. The savings would come largely from a boost in GDP resulting from undocumented immigrants gaining citizenship and in turn likely making more money.

  • High-Tech Companies Say Reform Would Boost Their Bottom Line

    Companies like Microsoft and Google have said that immigration reform would help them by <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2013/01/29/facebook-microsoft-back-senate.html" target="_blank">allowing for more H1B visas</a>, a special kind of visa geared toward highly-skilled immigrants. The tech giants say they can't find enough qualified people in the U.S. to fill their staffing needs.

  • Reform Would Boost The Wages Of Native-Born Workers

    U.S.-born workers see between a 0.1 and 0.6 percent boost in wages on average with an increase in immigration, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/30/immigration-reform-workers_n_2583576.html" target="_blank">according to a January report from the Hamilton Project</a>, an economic policy initiative of the nonpartisan Brookings Institution. That's because immigrant workers bring skills with them that complement those of native-born workers, leading to new jobs.

  • Immigrants Are Entrepreneurial

    Immigrants are <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/03/13/economic-case-commonsense-immigration-reform" target="_blank">more than twice as likely</a> than native-born Americans to start new businesses, according to a White House report on immigration reform.

  • Reform Would Boost GDP By More Than $1 Trillion Over 10 Years

    Immigration reform <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/id/100449802" target="_blank">would boost GDP by $1.5 trillion</a> -- or about 1 percent -- over 10 years, according to an estimate from UCLA professor Raul Hinojosa-Ojeda cited by CNBC.

  • Immigrants Create Jobs

    Businesses owned by immigrants <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/03/13/economic-case-commonsense-immigration-reform" target="_blank">created 4.7 million jobs</a> in the U.S. in 2007, according to a White House report on immigration reform.

  • Reform Would Bring In More Money Than It Costs In Benefits

    Though many critics of immigration reform argue against the cost of providing increased public benefits, analysts say higher spending is not a likely consequence. A Congressional Budget Analysis of George W. Bush's 2007 immigration reform proposal found that it would cost the government $23 billion in more public services, but bring in $48 billion in revenue, <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/31/worried-about-the-economy-then-pass-immigration-reform/" target="_blank">according to the Washington Post</a>.