Ghosts Of The Rio Grande

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BORDER SOUTH TEXAS
n this Jan. 27, 2012 photo, a Border Patrol agent drags tires along the border fence to make way for fresh footprints near Brownsville, Texas. A year after completion of the border fence the government is installing 44 gates in South Texas leaving swaths of farmland and some homes between the fence and the border. (AP Photo/Chris Sherman) | AP
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The path across the border is littered with bodies. Bodies old and bodies young. Bodies known and bodies unknown. Bodies hidden, bodies buried, bodies lost, and bodies found. The stories of the dead haunt the frontier towns from Nuevo Laredo to Nogales, and even deep within the interior of Mexico down to Honduras, someone always knows someone who has vanished—one of los desaparecidos—during their journey north.

Many of those missing end up in the South Texas soil. Out on the Glass Ranch, a man named Wayne Johnson stumbles upon a skull, some bones, and a pair of dentures scattered near a dry pond. During a bass fishing tournament at La Amistad Lake, anglers come upon a decomposing corpse near the water’s edge. Late one summer night, a train rumbles down the Union Pacific Line, but it fails to rouse a father and son slumbering on the tracks. For 2012, Brooks County, with a population of just 7,223, reported 129 deaths from immigrants trying to evade the Border Patrol checkpoint in Falfurrias, double the previous year. The county judge told the San Antonio Express-News that Brooks had run out of space for John Does in its Sacred Heart Cemetery.

Read the whole story at The American Prospect

Also on The Huffington Post

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