The sweltering summer heat can be brutal for women with oily skin. No matter how many times you powder your nose or press oil-blotting sheets against your T-zone, the shine always returns. But we may have discovered a way to manage oily skin for good.

During one of our late-night YouTube marathons, we came across a foundation and concealer tutorial on Ambrosia Malbrough's channel. The Arizona-based blogger and designer bravely went bare-faced as she took us through the basics of her daily face. But what made us pause the video within the first five seconds was Ambrosia's primer: liquid laxative.

To tame her oily skin and create a matte makeup finish, Ambrosia applied Milk of Magnesia on her face. The milky-white laxative blended onto her brown skin seamlessly, and from her calm demeanor, we concluded that it didn't burn. But why would anyone want to use Milk of Magnesia as face primer?

After doing some research, we discovered that this oily skin trick has been tried-and-tested since the 1940s, and even Tyra Banks uses it as a secret weapon to absorb excess oil. But we decided to try it out ourselves, and we have a few words of advice:

It's better to be safe than sorry. Choose a small spot on your forearm or near your ear to be sure the laxative doesn't cause breakouts or irritation.

Keep it light. Layer too much Milk of Magnesia on your skin and you'll end up with chalky residue.

Wear it with foundation. We wouldn't recommend sporting the product alone, as it works best with foundation or tinted BB cream to avoid that ashy appearance.

Would you use Milk of Magnesia as primer?

If you think this is strange...

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  • Solid Gold Facial

    Why not add a little bling to your beauty routine? Now you can -- if you live in Florida and have enough cash to dish out for the, wait for it, 24 carat gold facial. Yep! Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach offers spa patrons the opportunity to have their entire body painted in gold. The thought is karats can help stave off cellulite and prevent aging.

  • The Caviar Facial

    At Channing's Day Spa in Chicago they think putting fish eggs on your face is better than Botox. They claim that freeze-dried caviar repairs sun damage and minimizes wrinkles.

  • Snake Massage

    In Israel, a snake massage is used to relieve heavy back tension and stress... you just have to block out the fact that your masseuse is a slithering snake! But fear not, all snakes are non-venomous.

  • Consuming Pig's Feet

    It started in Japan and then New Yorkers found out about it. The idea is to eat pig's feet and since they are rich in collagen, it will help get rid of wrinkles.

  • The Bee Venom Mask

    This has been marketed as a natural and organic alternative to botox. It was released by Heaven by Deborah Mitchell and <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/09/kate-middleton-skin_n_1760202.html" target="_blank">boasts big fans like Kate Middleton and the Duchess of Cornwall</a>.

  • Derriere Facial

    It's not just your face that deserves a little TLC... In the US, the new 'butt facial' is a treatment that is designed to tone, de-blemish, massage, and polish your neglected derriere.

  • Bull's Sperm Hair Care

    Dubbed the, 'Viagra for hair', this hair conditioning treatment is derived from the sperm of a bull. Combined with a protein-rich Katera root, this treatment promises to help repair broken hair and give it a silky smooth look...

  • Cactus Massage

    A cactus would be the last thing you think of when dreaming about a relaxing massage, but the spiky cactus leaf can be used as a massaging instrument. A prick-free cactus pad is used to rub down the skin and help bring out the toxins, whilst absorbing a blend of hydrating cactus meringue and cactus blossom into your skin.

  • Placenta Face Cream

    The placenta has another use other than feeding an unborn baby - as an anti-ageing beauty cream! For the cream, lamb placental extract is taken to create a potent lotion which rich in nutrients and bio-stimulants, promising to revitalise and moisturise your skin.

  • Hay Body Wrap

    In Italy, you can indulge (if you could call it that) with a wet hay body wrap. But before you conjure images of a scratchy experience, this treatment has a twist - you soak in a water bed heated to over 100F degrees while you're wrapped in the hay. The unusual treatment is said to fortify your immune system and stimulate your metabolism.

  • Bird's Poo Facial

    A favourite with the Japanese Geisha ladies, this unusual facial made from sterilised nightingale bird excrement, is proving to be popular with Western beauty-seekers too. The treatment promises to brighten up the complexion and contains enzymes which act as an effective skin cleanser.

  • Beer Bath

    Although a cold beer helps ease the stress away after a hard day, but a beer bath? In West Bohemia, Czech Republic, they believe that beer has super healing powers and have spas around the country offering 'relaxing' beer baths. Apparently beer has skin boosting B vitamins and helps those with high blood pressure. Not to be outdone, a spa in Japan called Yunessan boasts a giant bath full of Sake, green tea, coffee and even ramen noodles...

  • Butter 'Tightening' Treatment

    In Ethiopia, a butter massage is the beauty treatment to have for women hoping to give their lady parts a 'makeover'. Massaged in butter from scalp to toe, butter is applied everywhere on the body (in and out). The women then sit above a smoke hole in a gymnastic-like pose until the butter melts completely. This bizarre treatment apparently tightens vaginal muscles post-pregnancy.

  • Vagina Brightner

    Lactacyd White Intimate Wash has hit the Thai beauty market, promising to make your privates "safely fairer within four weeks" Because according to them: "Sweat and excessive friction from tight clothing can darken the skin around the intimate area, causing self-consciousness, decreased confidence or inhibiting intimacy."

  • Vagina Tightener

    India's 18 Again "tightening and rejuvenating" cream was advertised through the medium of song and dance. Rishi Bhatia, chairman and managing director of Ultratech India, told Campaign India: "18 Again is a first-of-its-kind product for women in India. This product is being launched in India post clinical trials conducted amongst women of all age groups under dermatological control.

  • Urine Therapy

    When we first heard that this weird beauty treatment may well be on the rise again, we had to do a bit of research. And here's what we found out: urine therapy was historically used by the Greeks and Romans to cure all that ailed them. It was also used to, ahem, whiten their teeth. Essentially, the procedure involves drinking your own urine in the hopes you'll look and feel younger. In modern times -- and on shows like 'My Strange Addiction' -- people have been known to drink urine for various reasons. Some scientists have even speculated urine has anti-carcinogenic properties -- which could stave off cancer and wrinkles. No real evidence has been found to support those claims.

  • Microcurrent Therapy for Cellulite

    The Smooth Synergy Cosmedical Spa in NYC scrubs your skin down with a papaya and mint scrub to take off dead skin and clean pores. But the real kicker is when they strap your booty up to a microcurrent therapy machine to zap away that cellulite.

  • Breast Milk Soap

    Milk does do a body good. But the trend toward making your own soap -- to be used when you shower or simply wash your hands -- out of breast milk is, well, a bit extreme. The trend emerged as people started to worry that brand-name soaps were full of chemicals and detergents that would harm their skin (or worse, cause cancer). And since milk is supposed to nourish the epidermis, well, why not turn excess breast milk into something, ahem, usable?

  • Snake Venom Cream

    Just because Gwyneth Paltrow swears by this cream -- and its accompanying facial -- doesn't mean you should actually try applying snake venom cream to your face. Apparently, using a cream which has venom as an active ingredient helps plump up the skin (much in the same way botox does).

  • Fish Pedicures

    This popular treatment has become a spa go-to for women around the world who want softer, smoother feet. Essentially, this treatment involves dipping your feet into a tank and letting hungry little fish -- Garra rufa fish -- gently eat away at the dead skin cells that make your skin feel rough. Some places and states have banned the practice for fears it may be unsanitary.

  • Fire Cupping

    Fire cupping is a natural treatment where a practitioner ignites a cotton ball soaked in alcohol and places it inside a cup. When the cup is placed against a patient's skin, a suction action begins to happen -- which is said to increase circulation. Once "activated," the glass bulbs can be moved to key "energy" points all over the body to boost the immune system and increase blood flow (which will help give skin a natural glow, making patients look younger). A big fan of the procedure is reportedly Gwyneth Paltrow.

  • Chocolate Body Wrap

    A chocolate body wrap? Well sign us up. Sure, there's no scientific evidence to support the claims treating your body to some of the sweet stuff will soothe, smooth and detoxify your skin, but it involves sitting in chococlate for an hour. Sounds pretty tasty to us. Check out the spa devoted to all sorts of chocolatey good beauty treatments.

  • Kim Kardashian Gets 'Vampire Facial'

    On the latest episode of 'Kourtney & Kim Take Miami," Kim decides to get what is called a 'Vampire Facial.' The procedure, where doctors take blood from a patients arm and stick it back in their face, left Kim in a great deal of pain. Kim says she underwent the cosmetic surgery because she wants to look more youthful and erase wrinkles. Kristina Behr has the gory details.

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