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Dina Powell Of Goldman Sachs '10,000 Women' On How Females Make GDP Rise (VIDEO)

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HuffPost Live
HuffPost Live

Global leaders gathering in Aspen this week are discussing why providing business education to women around the world creates more economic stability and social equity.

Dina Powell, president of the Goldman Sachs Foundation, joined HuffPost Live at the Aspen Ideas Festival -- a conference dedicated to finding solutions to critical global issues -- to discuss the 10,000 Women initiative.

Goldman Sachs launched the $100 million program to reach underprivileged women in more than 40 countries and provide them with a business education as well as access to investment capital. Powell explained that investing in women is crucial for improving global economies.

"When more women join the labor force, and particularly become entrepreneurs, GDP rises dramatically in those countries -– in both developed and developing economies."

She also stressed that the results of the 10,000 women program help fight against social inequality and improved access to health care.

“When women are economically independent, they have more political voice, their children are more educated, [and] health care improves in the community," she told HuffPost Live. "And so it’s really a multiplier effect and we’ve seen that.”

Powell's comments on the importance of providing underserved women with a business education are supported by research conducted by Goldman Sachs and other global institutions.

This video is part of a series of interviews with speakers, attendees and panelists at The Aspen Ideas Festival, produced by The Huffington Post in conjunction with The Aspen Institute. For more videos from the series, click here. For more information about The Aspen Institute, click here.

Watch the full interview here, and then check out real-time tweets from the National Service Summit here:

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