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07/08/2013 07:08 pm ET Updated Jul 09, 2013

Map Shows History Of Deadly Airplane Crashes In The United States

It's been a dark few days for air travel.

On Saturday, Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crashed in San Francisco, killing two and seriously injuring others. The following day, 10 people were killed in an air taxi crash and fire at a small Alaska airport.

We took a look at the history of fatal commercial airline crashes in the United States over the past 20 years and found some interesting results. Click through the interactive map below for information on the accident dates and death tolls:

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The map's contents reveal an important detail about our history with commercial airlines: Flights are much safer now than they have ever been before.

"Crashes are definitely more survivable today than they were a few decades ago," said Kevin Hiatt, president and CEO of the Flight Safety Foundation. "We've learned from the past incidents."

Safety has vastly improved on U.S. flights over the past two decades, exemplified by both a decrease in the frequency of crashes and in the number of deaths.

For instance, 1994 saw three fatal airplane crashes in the United States, resulting in 238 fatalities. Saturday's crash in San Francisco was the first deadly incident in the country since 2009, and two of the 307 passengers were killed.

And while the U.S. has a higher number of airplane-related deaths than any other country, MarketWatch pointed out that our airline market is by far the world's most robust. According to the Department of Transportation, 815.3 million people traveled on U.S. airlines and airlines serving the United States in 2012.

"What's really important is for people to understand that airplane crashes, the majority of them are survivable," National Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said on CBS News' "Face The Nation" on Sunday.

Map by Anna Almendrala for The Huffington Post.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article inaccurately stated that the San Francisco crash was the first deadly commercial airplane crash since 2005. This statement did not account for Continental Flight 3407 in 2009, which killed 51 people in New York.

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