TEHRAN, Iran — Iranian state television says the country has opened its own domestically made national email service.

The report aired Sunday quoted Information and Communication Technology Minister Mohammad Hasan Nami as saying local experts created the service's software. The report said each Iranian will be assigned an email address.

The country's postal service will manage the email service.

Iran has discussed for years having its own domestic email service as the government occasionally has blocked access to foreign email providers like Gmail and Yahoo. The country also has blocked and made illegal virtual private networks that allow Iranians to freely use the Internet and access banned websites like those for opposition groups.

Official statistics suggest Iran, home to 75 million people, has some 32 million Internet users.

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  • Iranian youth play at a game net arcade which is decorated with carpets of the portraits of Iran's late founder of Islamic Republic, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (L), supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei (R) and an Islamic religious portrait, in the city of Qom, some 130 kilometres south of the capital, on June 9, 2013. AFP PHOTO/BEHROUZ MEHRI (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Iranians use internet at a cybercafe in the center of the Iranian capital Tehran on May 14, 2013. Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Iranians use internet at a cybercafe in the center of the Iranian capital Tehran on May 14, 2013. Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Iranian uses a computer at a cybercafe in the center of the Iranian capital Tehran on May 14, 2013. Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Iranians use computers at a cybercafe in the center of the Iranian capital Tehran on May 14, 2013. Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Iranian man surfs the internet at a cafe in centeral of Tehran on January 24, 2011, a day after Iran officially launched its cyber police unit to confront Internet crimes and counter social networks that spread 'espionage and riots,' police chief Esmaeil Ahmadi Moghaddam said. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Iranian man surfs the internet at a cafe in centeral of Tehran on January 24, 2011, a day after Iran officially launched its cyber police unit to confront Internet crimes and counter social networks that spread 'espionage and riots,' police chief Esmaeil Ahmadi Moghaddam said. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Iranian woman surfs the internet at a cafe in centeral of Tehran on January 24, 2011, a day after Iran officially launched its cyber police unit to confront Internet crimes and counter social networks that spread 'espionage and riots,' police chief Esmaeil Ahmadi Moghaddam said. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Iranian youth browses a political blog at an internet cafe in the city of Hamadan, 360 kms southwest of Tehran, on May 27, 2009. Reformists in Iran have taken to the Internet in a bid to mobilise their supporters and circumvent their lack of access to state-controlled media ahead of next month's presidential election. AFP PHOTO/NIMA DAYMARI (Photo credit should read NIMA DAYMARI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A picture taken of the screen of a laptop shows a webpage that appears when an Iranian user tries to visit websites which are blocked by the government, on May 13, 2013 in the Iranian capital Tehran. The top line reads in Farsi 'Year of political and economical epoch,' referring to supreme leader, Ali Khamenei who has named the new Iranian year and the bottom line reads in Farsi 'We honour world Labour Day'. Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say. AFP PHOTO/BEHROUZ MEHRI (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A picture taken of the screen of a tablet shows a webpage that appears when an Iranian user tries to visit websites which are blocked by the government, on May 13, 2013 in the Iranian capital Tehran. The top line reads in Farsi 'Year of political and economical epoch,' referring to supreme leader, Ali Khamenei who has named the new Iranian year and the bottom line reads in Farsi 'Congratulation for the birthday of Fatima, Prophet Muhammed's daughter, Happy Mother's Day and Women's Day.' Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say. AFP PHOTO/BEHROUZ MEHRI (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A picture taken of the screen of a tablet shows a webpage that appears when an Iranian user tries to visit websites which are blocked by the government, on May 13, 2013 in the Iranian capital Tehran. The top line reads in Farsi 'Access to the intended webpage is not possible.' Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say. AFP PHOTO/BEHROUZ MEHRI (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)