A woman in China's Anhui province has been rescued after spending a night stuck between two walls.

According to the Independent, she'd taken a narrow path between two buildings, believing it to be a shortcut on her way home, then become lodged, unable to move, for seven hours.

Unfortunately for both the woman and the owners of the buildings she was pancaked against, her calls for help were believed to be the cries of a ghost. As such, they were ignored (as much as the incessant cries of a ghost can be) until the next morning, when passersby raised the alarm, CNN notes.

Once firefighters arrived, she was rescued in less than half an hour.

Shanghaiist reports the woman didn't suffer any major injuries and has recovered.

Earlier this year, firefighters in Portland, Ore., rescued a woman after she also became stuck between two buildings for more than four hours. The woman in that incident had fallen into the opening, though it isn't clear how she'd done so.

WATCH the CCTV report below (in Mandarin):

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  • Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong, left, and Francois Pinault, right, art collector and founder of the Kering business group and patriarch of the Pinault family that donated the bronze animal heads, attend a ceremony to unveil a pair of Qing dynasty bronzes that were looted from a Beijing palace more than 150 years ago and returned this year at China's National Museum in Beijing, Friday, June 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Christopher Bodeen)

  • Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong claps during a ceremony to unveil a pair of Qing dynasty bronzes that were looted from a Beijing palace more than 150 years ago and returned this year by the family that runs French luxury-goods conglomerate Kering at China's National Museum in Beijing, Friday, June 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Christopher Bodeen)

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  • A woman (R) navigates around the historic Jesuit designed Huánghuazhèn maze (10,000-flower maze) at the Old Summer Palace in Beijing on January 6, 2013. (MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A woman (C) poses for photos at the ruins of the historic Jesuit designed Yuanying Guan (Immense Ocean Observatory) at the Old Summer Palace in Beijing on January 6, 2013. (MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A woman (R) navigates the historic Jesuit designed Huánghuazhèn maze (10,000-flower maze) at the Old Summer Palace in Beijing on January 6, 2013. (MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • In this Monday, July 9, 2012 photo, a girl wearing Qing Dynasty royal style headset plays outside China's National Museum on the east of the Tiananmen Square in Beijing. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)