An Ivy League professor made headlines after penning a blog post saying the George Zimmerman verdict helps support the notion that the "American god" is a "white racist god."

On Saturday, July 13 a jury of six women -- five of whom were white -- found Zimmerman not guilty on all charges relating to the 2012 shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. The following day Anthea Butler, an associate professor of Religious Studies and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania with a Ph.D. in religion from Vanderbilt and a Masters in Theology from Fuller Theological Seminary, took to online magazine Religion Dispatches to discuss Zimmerman's acquittal.

She opened her piece referencing a book she first encountered as a seminary student: Is God a White Racist? by Rev. Dr. William R. Jones. Paralleling the ideas proposed in this book with the Martin case, she says she now understands the meaning behind Jones' message.

From her post on Religion Dispatches:

God ain’t good all of the time. In fact, sometimes, God is not for us. As a black woman in a nation that has taken too many pains to remind me that I am not a white man, and am not capable of taking care of my reproductive rights, or my voting rights, I know that this American god ain’t my god. As a matter of fact, I think he’s a white racist god with a problem. More importantly, he is carrying a gun and stalking young black men.

Butler went on to state how Zimmerman himself said the shooting of Martin was part of "God's plan" for him. She noted how other conservative Christians in America might use such ideology as a defense, which could lead to the subjugation of others.

"When the laws were never made for people who were considered, constitutionally, to be three-fifths of a person, I have to ask: Is this just?" she wrote. "Is it right? Is God the old white male racist looking down from white heaven, ready to bless me if I just believe the white men like Rick Perry who say the Zimmerman case has nothing to do with race?"

The post received vehement criticism from conservative bloggers and Internet trolls alike. Josiah Ryan, editor-in-chief of Campus Reform, the first site to report on Butler's post, dubbed her remarks "hateful" and "designed to hurt" while speaking with Fox News.

Butler argues, however, that her piece has been misinterpreted. Her message was not a blanket one. She was referring to two very distinct entities when she wrote "god" and "God."

"First of all they don't understand it's between small 'g' god and big 'G' God," Butler said of her critics during a phone conversation with The Huffington Post about the backlash. "Big 'G' God is the deity. Little 'g' is different kinds of gods. Anyone who reads Religion Dispatches knows this. ... But this was especially touchy for [conservative Christians] because I hit on some things that are kind of true."

This isn't the first time she has faced venom from detractors. Back in December, she received hate mail regarding comments about gun control and racism after the massacre in Newtown, Conn. She has been called the B-word and the N-word; people have demanded UPenn fire her, despite her tenured status.

She even has a Tumblr called "The Things People Say," which catalogues a handful of hateful comments hurled her way.

"The fact that I even continue to write is my way of saying, 'I'm going to engage the public whether you people like it or disagree or not,'" she said. "It is a calling for me. I went to seminary. I got a Ph.D. Some people decide to minister and go to church and preach. My calling is to engage the public and the public's understanding of religion. That is what I do. That is who I am. It's to talk about these hard things, like race and religion."

Butler believes all of the hate she has received further proves her point.

"[It's] foreign to people who think they know how American behavior should be," she said. "People say we are post-racial, but we are anything but post-racial. We are in Jim Crow Part II. And that is what's going on. It's tiring, but I am resolute."

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  • MLK in Hoodie

  • Congregants arrive at Middle Collegiate Church in New York, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Rev. Tony Lee

  • Rev. Raphael Warnock

    Rev. Raphael Warnock wears a hoodie during his morning sermon at the Ebenezer Baptist Church on Sunday, March 25, 2012, in Atlanta. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Vino Wong) MARIETTA DAILY OUT; GWINNETT DAILY POST OUT

  • Rev. Tony Lee and Trayvon Martin

  • Congregants wear hoodies during a service at Middle Collegiate Church in New York, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

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  • Congregants wear hoodies during a morning sermon at the Ebenezer Baptist Church on Sunday, March 25, 2012, in Atlanta. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Vino Wong) MARIETTA DAILY OUT; GWINNETT DAILY POST OUT

  • Rev. Raphael Warnock

    Rev. Raphael Warnock wears a hoodie during his morning sermon at the Ebenezer Baptist Church on Sunday, March 25, 2012, in Atlanta. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Vino Wong) MARIETTA DAILY OUT; GWINNETT DAILY POST OUT

  • Congregants wearing hoodies participate in a service at Middle Collegiate Church in New York, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Jacqueline Lewis

    Senior Minister Jacqueline Lewis, right, prays with other congregants during a service at Middle Collegiate Church in New York, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Kia Sears

    Kia Sears, of Washington, right, with her dog Dash, attends a rally for Trayvon Martin at Freedom Plaza in Washington, Saturday, March 24, 2012. Sears picked up a hoodie for her dog that morning special for the rally, where many people wore hooded sweatshirts in support of Martin. Martin, an unarmed young black teen, was fatally shot by a volunteer neighborhood watchman. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

  • A man wears a hoodie before the start of a service at Middle Collegiate Church in New York, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch captain in Florida. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Lester G. Jackson, Emanuel Jones

    Sen. Lester G. Jackson, III, D-Savannah, right, puts his hoodie on as he leaves the Georgia Senate floor with Sen. Emanuel Jones, D-Decatur, left, to join a rally outside the statehouse in memory of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed 17-year-old who was killed by a Florida neighborhood watch captain, Monday, March 26, 2012, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  • Jonathan Winder

    Jonathan Winder wears a hoodie with a bag of Skittles attached while participating in a candlelight vigil held in memory of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed 17-year-old who was killed by a Florida neighborhood watch captain while returning from a convenience store, Monday, March 26, 2012, at LOVE park in Philadelphia.(AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek)

  • Demonstrators march in support of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year old black youth shot and killed on the night of Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla. by a neighborhood watchman, in downtown Cincinnati Monday March 26 , 2012. The march, led from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County to Fountain Square was billed as Occupy the Hood Cincinnati, in reference to the hoodie Martin was wearing when he was killed. (AP Photo/The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gary Landers) MANDATORY CREDIT; NO SALES

  • Monsanna Torbert, 3, of Westwood, carries a sign reading "Do I Look Suspect?" during a march in support of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year old black youth shot and killed on the night of Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla. by a neighborhood watchman, in downtown Cincinnati Monday March 26 , 2012. The march, led from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County to Fountain Square was billed as Occupy the Hood Cincinnati, in reference to the hoodie Martin was wearing when he was killed. (AP Photo/The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gary Landers) MANDATORY CREDIT; NO SALES

  • Makayla Lane, 9, of East Walnut Hills, joins demonstrators during a march in support of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year old black youth shot and killed on the night of Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla. by a neighborhood watchman, in downtown Cincinnati Monday March 26 , 2012. The march, led from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County to Fountain Square was billed as Occupy the Hood Cincinnati, in reference to the hoodie Martin was wearing when he was killed. (AP Photo/The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gary Landers) MANDATORY CREDIT; NO SALES

  • Bobby Rush

    This handout frame grab from video, provided by House Television shows Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., wearing a a hoodie, speaking on the floor of the House on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 28, 2012. Rush donned a hoodie during a speech on the House floor deploring the killing of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin, receiving a reprimand for violating rules on wearing hats in the House chamber. (AP Photo/House Television)

  • Bobby Rush

    This series of handout frame grabs from video, provided by House Television shows Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., taking off his jacket to wear a a hoodie and sunglasses as he speaks on the floor of the House on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 28, 2012. Rush donned a hoodie during the speech on the House floor deploring the killing of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin, receiving a reprimand for violating rules on wearing hats in the House chamber. (AP Photo/House Television)

  • Leland Yee, Holly Mitchell, Curren Price

    Assemblywoman Holly Mitchell, D-Los Angeles, touches the hood of her sweat shirt as she talks of the shooting of Trayvon Martin during a news conference at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, March 29, 2012. More than a dozen Senators and Assembly members wore hooded sweat shirts on the floor of each chamber and ended the day's session in memory of the 17-year-old who was shot to death Feb. 26 by a neighborhood watch volunteer in a gated community in Sanford, Fla . Also seen are state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, left, and Sen. Curren Price, D-Los Angeles, right.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

  • People gather during a "One Thousand Hoodies March for Trayvon Martin" event Thursday, March 29, 2012 at the University of Minnesota campus in Minneapolis. Martin, a Florida teenager, was wearing a hoodie when he was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Renee Jones Schneider) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT

  • A man wears a hoodie and a scarf with the likeness of Trayvon Martin during a "One Thousand Hoodies March for Trayvon Martin" event Thursday, March 29, 2012 at the University of Minnesota campus in Minneapolis. Martin, a Florida teenager, was wearing a hoodie when he was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Renee Jones Schneider) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT

  • Fabian Washington, center, chants during a "One Thousand Hoodies March for Trayvon Martin" event Thursday, March 29, 2012 at the University of Minnesota campus in Minneapolis. Martin, a Florida teenager, was wearing a hoodie when he was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer. AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Renee Jones Schneider) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT

  • Antonio Kelly, 6, stands with his mother, Sha'Ron Webb, during a "One Thousand Hoodies March for Trayvon Martin" event Thursday, March 29, 2012 at the University of Minnesota campus in Minneapolis. Martin, a Florida teenager, was wearing a hoodie when he was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Renee Jones Schneider) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, March 28, 2012 file photo, Jordan Rodgers, 9, wears a hoodie as he participates in a protest calling for justice in the killing of Trayvon Martin, an African-American teenager shot and killed by a neighborhood watch guard, George Zimmerman, in Florida. The gathering at Westlake Park in Seattle drew hundreds of people. (AP Photo/seattlepi.com, Joshua Trujillo)

  • FILE - In this Sunday, March 25, 2012 file photo, Patrick Mulchay, center, joins other congregants in song during a service at Middle Collegiate Church in New York. Church-goers were invited to wear hoodies to services to show their support for justice in the case of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was wearing a hoodie on the night he was killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • FILE - In this March 22, 2012 , file photo, wearing a hoodie and holding a rose, James Gilchrist of Orlando, Fla., attends a rally for slain teenager Trayvon Martin, in Sanford, Fla. The jury in the trial of neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman began deliberating his fate, Friday, July 12, 2013, on charges in the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon. (AP Photo/Roberto Gonzalez, File)

  • Tracy Martin, Sybrina Fulton

    FILE - In this March 21, 2012, file photo, demonstrators pray during the Million Hoodie March for slain teenager Trayvon Martin in Union Square in New York. The jury in the trial of neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman began deliberating his fate, Friday, July 12, 2013, on charges in the 2012 shooting death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

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