Rick Scott Rushed Away By Staff After 'Stand Your Ground' Question

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RICK SCOTT AIDES RUSH
Florida Gov. Rick Scott (right) refuses to budge despite calls to repeal his state's controversial "Stand Your Ground" law. (AP Photo, File) | AP
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Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) was whisked away by his aides on Thursday after a reporter asked him a question about the state's controversial "Stand Your Ground" law.

According to Central Florida News 13, Scott was in Tampa to meet with representatives from the entertainment industry when a journalist queried him on the Stand Your Ground law during a media availability.

"Scott responded that he did not support getting rid of the law, but before he could elaborate, he was rushed out by his media relations team," the station reported. "No follow-up questions were allowed."

The governor was also in Bradenton to meet with business leaders. The Sarasota Herald-Tribune's Jeremy Wallace tweeted on Thursday afternoon that the latter event was likewise cut short.

Meanwhile, protesters have been staging a sit-in at Scott's office in Tallahassee, trying to pressure him to call a special legislative session to repeal Stand Your Ground. "The governor has to come back. We have to take another look at this," said Tallahassee NAACP President Dale Landry.

The Florida law allows individuals to stand their ground and use deadly force in self-defense, with no obligation to attempt a retreat from a dangerous situation. It lay at the heart of the trial of George Zimmerman, who was found not guilty last Saturday in the killing of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

The NAACP has asked Scott to visit the Tallahassee protesters, who have been demonstrating since Tuesday, but the governor has not yet responded. The demonstrators have said they won't leave until he grants their demand for a special session.

Scott has also insisted that the Zimmerman case had nothing to do with Stand Your Ground.

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