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Mitch McConnell To John McCain And Chuck Schumer: 'When Are You All Getting Married?'

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) took a jab at the relationship between Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) in an interview with National Review published Monday.

"We don’t have any rules that you don’t talk to any Democrats," he told the conservative magazine of McCain's work with the Obama administration. "That's McCain being McCain."

"You know, I was kidding [New York Democrat Chuck Schumer] and McCain the other day, and asked, ‘When are you all getting married? It’s getting almost embarrassing," McConnell told the National Review.

Though McConnell was clearly joking with the remark, the sentiment is indicative of a dismissive attitude towards bipartisanship. The Kentucky senator is facing a primary challenge against tea party-backed Matthew Bevin in a deeply Republican state. McConnell and McCain's relationship is also said to be getting rocky after McCain's role in brokering a deal to avoid the so-called nuclear option to allow votes on President Barack Obama's nominees.

McCain and Schumer, meanwhile, crafted a bipartisan immigration bill that passed the Senate but faces an uncertain future in the House. McCain and Schumer speak on the phone five to six times a day, according to a recent Politico article that described them as two sides of a "power triangle."

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